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Virus protection


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6 replies to this topic

#1 turtletary

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 11:56 PM

I thought AVG and Microsoft 'security' would do the trick.. but Dell assures me I need something "better"??? After hours of 'tech-support' diagnostics.. they tell me I need to re-install XP Home again - the 'factory' hard drive was clean when it left Dell. I'm not looking forward to this.

What is a good "security system" that will protect my computer?

Thanks...

Terry
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#2 lowtek_otc

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:16 AM

That is entirely opinion based.

I actually prefer the norton 2009 products, however defender and AVG are plenty for some.

The best way to protect yourself is to be smart about the internet and as I always say... "click safely"
For the most part viruses are user error in my opinion.

#3 Queen-Evie

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:22 AM

There is no one size fits all when it comes to computer security. We can recommend products to you-but a persons recommendation is what works for him/her. What works for one person may not work for someone else. Example: I tried McAfee antivirus many years ago. It made my computer run slower than a turtle. Since then, I have stayed away from McAfee. I ditched Norton because it also caused issues that Symantec could not solve.
Do you want to use free programs or a purchased program? There are plenty of both types that are good. The best thing you can do is research your options. Try a few. Evaluate the program. Is it simple to use and understand? Is the interface user-friendly? Does it have a negative impact on your system? It won't take you long to get a feel for it.

For free program suggestions, there is a list here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic3616.html

If you are thinking about purchasing a program, see if that program has a free trial offer. If it does, install it and evaluate it.
This gives you the opportunity to see if the program plays nice with your system.

What issues were/are you having that led to Dell saying you needed to reinstall the OS?

#4 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:41 AM

The general consensus at this time is that you should have a active anti virus and firewall. Most people have that and will run scans with a good spyware and malware application. Most of us here use free applications that work just fine. I'm currently using Avast anti virus, Ashampoo firewall, and run scans with SUPERAntiSpyware and Malwarebytes. If you keep all of you application definitions up to date and run scan on a regular basis you are doing about all you can to protect yourself. The other side of this is knowing what you are opening in your email, and what is a legitimate warning that should be acted upon. There are pop-ups that will tell you that you are infected and that you need to run their scan which usually will plant something in your computer, you have to just know what to trust.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 hamluis

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 08:19 AM

I will just add that...IMO, the "security system" for anything belonging to a human...starts with the human.

If we are talking computer security, the owner has to take the responsibility for smart computing practices. Included among these practices are varied things (various programs that can help), but the real key is the user's dedication to fulfillment of her/his security responsibilities.

When I was in the Army, there were certain principles they taught about physical security. The most basic of those were:

a. No matter how many safeguards are devised or utilized...they can all be overcome by one human being who chooses not follow the procedures inherent in using those safeguards.

b. There is no such thing as a perfect defense against everything...if someone wants to get in, they will get in...if they have a sufficient amount of time to do so.

I think we, as users of computers, can relate to those principles.

I also noted that I did not see any mention of critical updates as the most basic implementation by a human of a computer defense posture.

Louis

#6 Deegem

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 08:43 AM

Traditional blacklist AV/AS scanners are useless against a zero day attack.

Windows updates are useless against zero day attacks as the authors of a zero day make sure that they can be bypassed before releasing as such into the wild.

System virtualization and application/browser Sandboxing is the way to go along with a decent backup such as ghost/true images.

Sandboxie and Returnil are a couple of decent apps you could have a look at.

#7 cb2

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 11:15 AM

Traditional blacklist AV/AS scanners are useless against a zero day attack.
Windows updates are useless against zero day attacks as the authors of a zero day make sure that they can be bypassed before releasing as such into the wild.
System virtualization and application/browser Sandboxing is the way to go along with a decent backup such as ghost/true images.
Sandboxie and Returnil are a couple of decent apps you could have a look at.

:thumbsup: Totally sold on Sandboxie. Wouldn't dream of opening my browser or testing out downloaded programs without it.




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