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Plugging any HD power plug into HD kills cpu/all else... .


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#1 lexrexus

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 06:44 PM

Plugging any HD power plug into a HD kills cpu/all else... .

Plugging power-plug of any of 4 hard-drives kills computer; whether ribbons are plugged in or not. Power-plugs don't kill when put in cd drive.

Power supply?? If so, how confirm - I have simple ohm/voltage tester - ?
Is there anything can be done w/power supply? Over a year old - but seldom used. Was an expensive one.

Is there a way to check for something else's causing that circuit in power supply to blow or be really weak? All HDs power-plug-pins ohms read comparably - may not mean anything but all I could think of to try/test.

Is it possibly something else??


Holding my breath - - Tnx!!!

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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 06:49 PM

So you have 4 HDD (Hard disk Drives) installed in this computer. With only the DVD/Rom drive connected, connecting any of the 4 HDD causes the computer to shut down?

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#3 lexrexus

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 03:34 PM

So you have 4 HDD (Hard disk Drives) installed in this computer. With only the DVD/Rom drive connected, connecting any of the 4 HDD causes the computer to shut down?


Exactly. :thumbsup:

??

#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 06:14 PM

The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.
At this point you can use a DC Voltmeter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail Voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC


To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 13 January 2009 - 06:15 PM.

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#5 lexrexus

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 01:35 AM

The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.


... .
Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.
At this point you can use a DC Voltmeter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the [color=red]Red
(+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail Voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC


... .



Thank you for your reply!
Pin 14 has gray wire on mine: with jumper to a black power-and-cpu-fans run.
black to yellow +12/blue >-11/4 red >+5/white -4.75/1 orange 5v/1 lavender +5/3 pins have purple +3.5

Besides extra colors orange doesn't match your voltage - maybe color wrong & pin v. ok? - pin 8 = +5v.
Purples are pins 11, 1, and 2. [+3.5v]
Lavender is pin 19. [+5v]

Does your info break voltages down re. pins, or just colors?


Thanks again!

#6 Goldwyn

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 01:44 AM

I might be off. However. I've gotten a friend of mine that had the same problem. Come to find out his power supply got so weak of years of use. It just couldn't supply the amps needed by his system. Needless to say. We both agreed to replace his power supply with a good 500watt unit. He did have 250 before. That one lasted him 6 years hope for at least 6 more years out of his new one
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#7 lexrexus

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:28 AM

I might be off. However. I've gotten a friend of mine that had the same problem. Come to find out his power supply got so weak of years of use. It just couldn't supply the amps needed by his system. Needless to say. We both agreed to replace his power supply with a good 500watt unit. He did have 250 before. That one lasted him 6 years hope for at least 6 more years out of his new one

[Mine is 450 watts and used maybe over a year but very little. What could have fried it?? How test HDs for problems? Mobo?]

#8 Goldwyn

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:44 AM

Well. As we all know. The power coming into the house isn't always clean. Sometimes Electrical noise can cause the circuits to inside to lose its ability to produce the correct amps needed to power the system. What I would do. Try another power supply if you happen to have one laying around. If you have 2 desktop computers. even better. just borrow the one from that machine and jump the green wire with any black wire to see if you can load the power box. Or you can fully plug everything in and power it on. If it starts up and runs. Problem solved. Sadly Power supplies have no user serviceable parts inside. You may have to replace the Power supply

Things to consider to cooking a healthy power supply

Wind storms that make the power lines sway causing noise in the lines

Power spikes.. This can be caused by a fridge shutting off or a washer or dryer. Hell even the toaster turning off causes spikes in the electrical system

Power sags. This can be caused by a device in the home that draw a lot of power that will drag down the normal voltage of power.

Don't forget that even lightning strikes the power lines can cause this problem.

To protect yourself. I Highly recommend a UPS battery backup system with a spike suppressor Most modern UPS have them built in as a standard feature
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#9 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:57 AM

The yellow, blue, red, white, orange are the colors of the five rail voltages of a PSU. Generally if the voltages meter out correctly the PSU usually is good. If you wish to see a complete color code for all 23 sockets you can look here.

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#10 Goldwyn

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:06 AM

Not true DC3. That old power supply that did go bad on me without a load would give perfect voltage. Soon as you put a load on it. Pop. It would just cut right out. It will run with a lesser load or no load. Soon as you give it a full workout. that's it. The lights go out I've gone to college to study hardware. Mostly for electrical devices. AC to DC conversion is pretty simple. Coil packs sometimes just burn out.. Think of it as a electrical Motor in a fan. They get over worked. they pop. Again electrical Noise with spikes and lags can cause the circuits to become weak.
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#11 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:26 AM

You do have to have a test load in order to properly read the rail voltages, and if you are using the method suggested in this topic the 5V and 12V rails have loads from the devices that the molex connectors are plugged into.

By the way, most PSU fail because the electrolytic capacitors break down.

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#12 Goldwyn

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:47 AM

You do have to have a test load in order to properly read the rail voltages, and if you are using the method suggested in this topic the 5V and 12V rails have loads from the devices that the molex connectors are plugged into.

By the way, most PSU fail because the electrolytic capacitors break down.


Agreed. They need to make them solid capacitors like the new boards have. Might last a little longer :flowers: I don't know about anyone else. I wouldn't mind paying a premium price for a good solid power supply. You can usually tell by how heavy the power supply is. Good FAT power coils and some thick Heat sinks. :thumbsup:
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#13 lexrexus

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 09:27 PM

... . You may have to replace the Power supply

Things to consider to cooking a healthy power supply:

... .

To protect yourself. I Highly recommend a UPS battery backup system with a spike suppressor Most modern UPS have them built in as a standard feature



Thanks 4 reply!! :flowers:

All the negatives you listed apply here. Have battery backup and surge suppressors, though.
Any way to rule out bad HD without frying another PSU? :thumbsup:

#14 dc3

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 02:12 AM

One of the the things that occurs to me is that if it is only when you plug in the hdds that this happens then you may have a short. Try powering up the hdds on at a time and see what happens. I would also physically inspect the hdds to be sure that that there isn't any contact between the circuit bond on the bottom of the hdd and the case where it is installed.

If you have another computer try plugging the hdds into a molex connector one at a time to see if they are powering up. Don't connect the data cable unless you have the jumper and cable connection configured as a slave.

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#15 garmanma

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 09:08 AM

Out in left field, but I've seen it do funny things--Have you recently rewired any outlets? Is the polarity correct for the circuit to the computer?
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