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Computer speakers problem


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#1 Alchemist

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 09:50 PM

I've got one annoying problem with an otherwise perfectly good set of external speakers with sub-woofer. One of the tweeter connectors (a standard jack like you see on the back of a stereo) doesn't grip properly and the sound frequently goes out on that channel when the connection is lost. Twisting it around can restore the connection, but having to sit there & hold the wire at an angle against the jack is not exactly the way you expect to operate speakers. And its rather inconvenient when you want to be playing a game with those speakers. Having opened the case (the tweeters plug into the back of the sub-woofer box) I can report that the jacks are integrated into the circuit board and not easily replaceable. Is there any way to make the male connector fit tighter in the connector? (Is this asking for jokes about Viagra for stereo plugs?) Maybe some sort of adapter?

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#2 Alchemist

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 11:31 PM

What? No one has any suggestions for making a simple stereo plug fit tighter?

#3 Boneshaker

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:17 AM

Years ago my brother had a similar problem with his stereo headphone jack ... he got someone to apply a couple of layers of gold leaf to the plug and they worked fine. Only problem was that the gold leaf wore off and had to be re-applied every so often.
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#4 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:11 AM

If you know how to use a soldering iron, go to Radio Shack and purchase a plug and replace the bad one. Take the bad plug with you so that you get the right one. The wire is coaxial, the outer wire is the ground, the center wire is the positive.

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#5 garmanma

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:05 PM

Combining the 2 suggestions
Using a soldering iron, carefully add a layer of solder to the male prong. More durable than gold leaf
Sand or scrape off the excess
or
Wrap some tape around the plug to another plug to put tension on it and hold it in position.
or
Buy a sound card

Edited by garmanma, 15 January 2009 - 12:10 PM.

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#6 Alchemist

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 10:32 PM

How about if I put some fine wire down inside the socket before putting the plug in? I thought of trying to 'wrap' it around the plug, but the clearance is too small. But maybe if I coil the wire around the plug to make it spiral in shape, then stick it inside the socket before inserting the male plug it will make better contact with the sides?

#7 dc3

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 11:10 PM

If this is the 1/8 inch plug that most all computer use there are two parts to it, a positive section and ground section. If you put wire inside the socket you will short it out. Are you sure that your problem is the plug and not the socket. Try switching the plug with another channel and see if the problem moves to that channel, if it doesn't then the problem is the socket, in which case it is time for a new sound card. Replacing the plug is still the best solution for the problem, if it is the plug. Adding solder and making it uniform over both the positive and ground sections of the plug is going to be extremely difficult.

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#8 Alchemist

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 02:12 PM

It's not the sound card, it's the speakers themselves. The sub-woofer cabinet is also the central connection for the tweeters, and the sockets are a custom job mounted to the circuit board, so replacing those is not possible. May as well buy new speakers as go to all that hassle.

I did notice two separate 'fins' inside the socket but the male plug is a solid piece of metal. No 'sections' to it, so I didn't think there was more than one connection involved there.




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