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How to protect my computer?


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#1 yellowdog5

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 11:39 AM

I have been using the commercial version of Bitdefender for the past 3 years. I also was using Spybot, but after they upgraded it I found it confusing and hard to understand, not to mention time consuming, so I removed it. So now the only thing I have is Bitdefender Antivirus 2009, and it expires tomorrow. I recently added 1 gb to my measly 127mb of memory, which I think will make spyware programs work more efficiently, but I don't know what I should use. Should I stick with Bitdefender? Or should I use a combination of the free programs? Can anyone recommend or suggest a combination of choices for spyware removers and antivirus programs? I have Windows XP professional, and I just now upgraded to SP3 after I installed the additional memory.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 11:42 AM

Choosing an anti-virus is a matter of personal preference, features offered, the amount of resources utilized, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular anti-virus that works well for one person may not work as well for another. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your use. Another factor to consider is whether you want to use a paid for product or free alternative.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.

See BC's Freeware Replacements For Common Commercial Apps and List of Virus & Malware Resources.
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#3 3xist_Comodo

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 10:50 PM

Try Comodo Internet Security Which has HIPS (Prevention) and AV (Detection). Since no AV Detects everything. :-)

Cheers,
Josh

Edited by 3xist_Comodo, 09 January 2009 - 10:52 PM.


#4 dopefish

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:06 AM

I have been using the commercial version of Bitdefender for the past 3 years. I also was using Spybot, but after they upgraded it I found it confusing and hard to understand, not to mention time consuming, so I removed it. So now the only thing I have is Bitdefender Antivirus 2009, and it expires tomorrow. I recently added 1 gb to my measly 127mb of memory, which I think will make spyware programs work more efficiently, but I don't know what I should use. Should I stick with Bitdefender? Or should I use a combination of the free programs? Can anyone recommend or suggest a combination of choices for spyware removers and antivirus programs? I have Windows XP professional, and I just now upgraded to SP3 after I installed the additional memory.


I'd still go with BitDefender if you're pleased and like quietman7 said you can use extra layers of protection depending on your needs. There is no anitvirus that offers full protection, but you can always try to keep protected by updates and additional on-demand scanning when in doubt.

Edited by dopefish, 09 February 2009 - 08:19 AM.


#5 quietman7

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 02:46 PM

Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:Avoid gaming sites, pirated software, cracking tools, keygens, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs. They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Many malicious worms and Trojans spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications. Read P2P Software User Advisories and Risks of File-Sharing Technology.

Keeping Autorun enabled on USB and other removable drives has become a significant security risk due to the increasing number of malware variants that can infect them and transfer the infection to your computer. To learn more about this risk, please read:
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