Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Blue Screens plague new computer


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 forcedlogic

forcedlogic

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 11:18 PM

I just bought a new computer a little over a month ago. Recently I started receiving blue screen errors. The errors are 0x7A and 0xF4.

After doing some researching online I did standard checks of viruses and spyware. Completely clean. So I moved on to RAM and HARDDRIVE. I checked the ram and it passed at 100%. So I checked the hard drive assuming that the hard drive could be going back 100% pass.

After doing more research I found that a common problem is that the hard drive is not set to Master and during sleep mode it causes these errors. So I went and checked my Bios for more information on my computer and found the following:

IDE Channel 0: Master: CDDVD
IDE CHannel 0: Slave: None
IDE Channel 1: Master: Hard Drive
IDE Channel 1: Slave: None

Now I am not a genius but generally when I have built computers in the past the hard drive is set as the master and cd rom as slave? Could this be causing my blue screen's? Further more does it matter if the hard drive is set to channel 0 or 1?

Thanks in advanced.
Patrick

PS

Windows XP Pro Sp3
Dual Core 3.0
2 gigs of Ram
Samsung Hard drive 500gig
ATI 3850

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 07:48 AM

Hi :thumbsup:.

<<Now I am not a genius but generally when I have built computers in the past the hard drive is set as the master and cd rom as slave?>>

It all depends on how many cables we are talking about...and the type of cables.

Yes, you are correct in assuming that the boot drive (or only hard drive) should be configured as the master when looking at BIOS and such...but the optical drive should also be configured as master, on a different cable. That's for the old PATA/IDE setups common to all motherboards.

But...it's no longer that simple :flowers:.

Newer motherboards which have only 1 IDE connection ...provide the opportunity for users to only connect 2 IDE devices (hard drives and optical drives), whereas older motherboards historically have provided at least 2 connections affording the opportunity to connect a total of 4 devices (2 on each cable, 1 as master with the other as slave). The newest motherboards may not even have any PATA connectors, providing nothing but SATA connectors.

So the old proverbial wisdom about not connecting the hard drive and the optical drive on the same cable...applies only to some motherboards, motherboards which have nothing but PATA connectors.

To add more confusion...SATA connectors have their own pattern in the BIOS. Since each connector can only support 1 device, users don't have to worry about master/slave jumper settings...but they still need to look in the BIOS and see which connector/connection is depicted as master. The boot SATA drive should be connected to the connector reflected in the BIOS as master, IMO...although I'm not sure if this is the only connection pattern that will work.

We need to know what type of connectors each drive has. It's possible for you to have 2 or more PATA...1 PATA and 2 or more SATA...or all SATA.

If you tell us the manufacturer and model of the system you bought...or the motherboard manufacturer and model if you had it custom built, someone can tell you how your connections should go.

Is that a SATA optical drive or the traditional PATA optical drive? Same question for the hard drive.

Wiki has a decent article which gives a view of the SATA motherboard connectors (1st pic) and the SATA cables (2d pic). Some SATA cables have the right angle connector pictured, some are straight...but the end on the two looks as pictured.

Thanks :trumpet:.

FWIW: BSODs can be caused by many things, let's wait for info for you and then we'll try to get the connections to what should work smoothly...and go from there.

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 06 January 2009 - 07:50 AM.


#3 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 08:49 AM

Louis,

Here is the information: Used Everest Home Edition

Motherboard:
CPU type Intel Pentium III Xeon Mhz (9x333)

Intel Core duo Cpu E8400 @ 3.00 Ghz

Now here is what worries me in Everest it doesn't name the motherboard but when I open it up it says Gigabyte. The only information it shows is:

7/25/08 G31-1CH7-6A99O-G0BC-00

When I looked on the at the box they sent me:
Gigbyte EG31M-S2 S-Series

The computer was custom built from cyberpowerpc.com.

I opened the computer and the cddvd drive is IDE? old flat wide cable and the hard drive is SATA if I am not mistaken short yellow cable that connects to the motherboard.

The cddvd is the primary master and the hard drive is the secondary master.

Thanks for your help!

#4 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 08:55 AM

Oh I also forgot the mention both the hard drive and cddvd drive are on different cables.

#5 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 09:17 AM

Thanks :thumbsup:.

Looks like you have 1 IDE connector (2 devices possible) and 4 SATA connectors, with the optical on the end connector of the IDE cable and the SATA drive on it's own cable.

Do the following with the system shut down/off.

If you look at your motherboard, each SATA connector should be assigned a number (0, 1, 2, 3). Make sure that your SATA drive is connected to the connector marked designated 0.

That's the one that is away to the left of the other 3 connectors, bottom of the MB, as you look at your motherboard with the case upright.

When you reboot the system, go directly into the BIOS. Look at the main screen (should reflect the two drives).

Go to the boot priority section of your BIOS and set the SATA drive (hard drive 0) as the 1st boot, with your optical drive as the 2d option. Save (hit F10).

Let us know if all seems OK.

Louis

#6 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 10:29 AM

Louis,

Remember seeing the hard drive plugged in to SATA 1 I am not sure the reason that they put it there. I will do as follows a post back this afternoon. Hope this works. Any ideas on why they set the hard drive the way they did? Seems odd to me.

Thanks,
Patrick

#7 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 10:44 AM

I'm not even sure it makes a difference...but I know that the SATA 0 slot is the first one that will appear in my BIOS (I have 2 motherboards, 1 has 1 PATA and 4 SATA slots, the other has 1 PATA and 4 SATA connectors).

Typically when recognizing drives, XP starts with 0 then 1, etc. I guess that I see no reason to start anywhere but at the beginning :thumbsup:.

Louis

#8 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 10:45 AM

I should also mention for some odd reason my hard drive is under letter I: instead of C: this has caused problems. Also I just wanted to make sure when I go into my bio the boot settings looks like this:

IDE Channel 0: Master: CDDVD
IDE CHannel 0: Slave: None
IDE Channel 1: Master: Hard Drive
IDE Channel 1: Slave: None

but what it should look like is this?

IDE Channel 0: Master: Hard drive
IDE CHannel 0: Slave: None
IDE Channel 1: Master: CDDVD
IDE Channel 1: Slave: None

#9 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 11:23 AM

The hard drive letter assignment I cannot explain...you'll have to ask whomever installed it.

I do know that the letter assigned should be C: and that it should have changed automatically when XP was booted. Perhaps it didn't change because XP was not selected as boot drive in BIOS...I don't know, have never run into such before.

Brief explanations:

If I clone a copy of my current hard drive...to another drive, a drive letter will be assigned (anything but C:, since the XP install I'm creating the clone within is the C: partition. If I then switch drives (remove the old, insert the new), when XP boots it will come up as C:, regardless of the letter previously assigned when it was not the boot partition/drive.

If I install XP via a disk image and then boot it, the same thing will happen...whatever letter had been previously assigned will become C:.

I have no explanation for drive letter I being assigned, but I know of a way to correct that (safely)...repair install of XP with only the two drives connected (no flash drives, no other drives). Let's leave that alone, for the time being.

With Windows open, go Start/Run...type diskmgmt.msc and hit Enter or OK. Post all of the data reflected in the lower portion of the screen, starting with Disk 0.

Thanks :thumbsup:.

Louis

Yes, your boot options in the BIOS should reflect the hard drive as IDE 0, with the optical drive as IDE 1...both described as Master.

Edited by hamluis, 06 January 2009 - 11:43 AM.


#10 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 11:41 AM

Louis,

Ha. One step ahead of you. When I started having problems with flash I had to research this. When I open diskmanagement. The hard drive is I:, CD rom is F: and then I have a card reader which is an 7 in 1 flash card reader. Apparently one of those removable drives is C:. When I try to change Hard drive from I: to C: it tells me boot information is on the drive and I am not allowed to change it.

Thanks,
Patrick

PS. In about 30 minutes I am going to go home and try changing everything via bios and reconnecting the hard drive to 0 to see what it does. Wish me luck.

#11 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 11:52 AM

If you remove the flash drives...remove everything except the optical drive and the hard drive...it may self correct.

If not, a repair install takes about 35 minutes and it will correct things.

Doing an XP install with flash drives attached...usually result in the wrong letter being assigned the boot/system partition/drive. Windows senses those capabilities and assigns a subsequent drive letter to the hard drive.

Louis

#12 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 12:36 PM

Louis,

I wanted to take a quick second to thank you. When I hooked the hard drive up to SATA 0 just WOW. The start-up is tons faster now. I guess going through SATA 1 slows it down because it hasn't booted that fast since I got it. I also changed the boot priories.

I wanted some minor clarification on the removable drives. Do I need to uninstall the drives and completely remove it/unconnect it from the power source or just uninstall the 7/1 the drivers so when I do the repair it won't see them.

Thanks again. I am testing it right now to see if the changes we've made so far will make a difference, I would still like to get the hard drive set to C:.

Thanks again for the help so far.

Patrick

Edited by forcedlogic, 06 January 2009 - 12:37 PM.


#13 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 01:44 PM

All credit to you...yes, remove them completely...otherwise the XP install routine will detect them and count them when assigning numbers.

I don't use flash drives (other than my .mp3 player) so I wouldn't take any chances. If a drivers CD came with the device, uninstall it via Device Manager. My .mp3 players are just plug-and-play, but I just make sure that I don't have any connected when I do an install.

When you do the repair, you will have to reinstall any critical updates which have transpired between the date the CD used came out and the current state of your system.

Since I have SP3 installed, I would have to be concerned about reinstalling all critical updates since the current SP level of whatever CD I use to do the repair. But, since I have slipstreamed a CD which contains everything up to SP3, I would probably have 20 or so critical updates to reinstall. But...if I used a CD that was only SP2-level, then I would have about 120 updates to install.

The easiest way to beat this reinstall of critical updates is:

a. Slipstream an XP CD which contains the SP level which is reflected on your system (I've done this).

nLite - Deployment Tool for Unattended Windows - Guide - http://www.nliteos.com/guide/index.html

IMO, using nLite is the easiest way for anyone to create an up-to-date XP install CD, but it's not the only way. Everyone should have one if using XP, since both a repair install and running sfc /scannow (a repair tool of great value) both require a current CD.

b. Just download now the missing SP that you may require. If you have SP1 already on the CD and want to get to SP3 level, just download the SP3 network install now and install same after your repair is finished. Then go to Windows Update. If you are content to stay at SP2 level (some persons are, for whatever reasons), then just download the SP2 network install. If the CD used doesn't have any of the SPs, then you will need 2 of the 3 available.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;displaylang=en

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;DisplayLang=en

If downloading either SP2 or SP3...ignore the bold print warning about "if you are updating a single computer", do not go to Windows Update as directed :thumbsup:.

Bear in mind...most of this stuff reads a lot harder than it really is :flowers:. If you have questions or problems, the forum is here for such.

Louis

#14 forcedlogic

forcedlogic
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 07:08 PM

Louis,

After reviewing the material listed I had one more question before I push forth. Doing a repair on the system and changing the drive letter to C: will that affect the registry or any of my programs. I realize the program listed above allows for all the current drivers on my system but I am worried that when I do the repair I might lose associates of the programs in the registry?

Thanks,
Patrick

#15 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,551 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:28 AM

Posted 06 January 2009 - 07:33 PM

Don't worry, it will all work as it should :thumbsup:.

The repair install replaces old system files and registry keys relating to those keys...and corrects path assignments.

The system knows that Windows is now where it was expected to be.

Louis




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users