Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Trojan Horse Generic_c.TSW detected


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Llanlad

Llanlad

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:37 PM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 10:47 AM

Hi all

It seems i have a virus and i have no real idea what to do ... so im asking for help !

Ive just scanned the computer and here is the log details.

Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware 1.32
Database version: 1617
Windows 5.1.2600 Service Pack 2

01/05/2009 3:36:08 PM
mbam-log-2009-01-05 (15-36-08).txt

Scan type: Quick Scan
Objects scanned: 60034
Time elapsed: 3 minute(s), 40 second(s)

Memory Processes Infected: 0
Memory Modules Infected: 0
Registry Keys Infected: 2
Registry Values Infected: 0
Registry Data Items Infected: 0
Folders Infected: 0
Files Infected: 8

Memory Processes Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Memory Modules Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Keys Infected:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\prunnet (Malware.Trace) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\xpreapp (Malware.Trace) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.

Registry Values Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Data Items Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Folders Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Files Infected:
C:\Documents and Settings\Owner\Local Settings\Temp\prun.tmp (Trojan.Downloader) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\senekabpjcqdrv.dll (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\senekaeaootkpu.dll (Trojan.Agent) -> Delete on reboot.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\senekadf.dat (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\seneka.dat (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\senekalog.dat (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\seneka.sys (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\senekawnuxqcwj.sys (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.

Ive also downloaded HijackThis is you need any details from this then please ask ..

Any help would really be appreciated ...

Thanks in advance

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,471 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:02:37 PM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 02:34 PM

Now rescan again with MBAM but this time perform a Full Scan in normal mode and check all items found for removal. Don't forgot to check for updates through the program's interface (preferable way) before scanning and to reboot afterwards. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware. When done, click the Logs tab and copy/paste the contents of the new report in your next reply.

IMPORTANT NOTE: One or more of the identified infections was related to a rootkit component. Rootkits and backdoor Trojans are very dangerous because they use advanced techniques (backdoors) as a means of accessing a computer system that bypasses security mechanisms and steal sensitive information which they send back to the hacker. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. Remote attackers use backdoor Trojans and rootkits as part of an exploit to gain unauthorized access to a computer and take control of it without your knowledge.

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, all passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed by using a different computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. If using a router, you need to reset it with a strong logon/password so the malware cannot gain control again. and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach. Because your computer was compromised please read How Do I Handle Possible Identify Theft, Internet Fraud and CC Fraud?

Although the rootkit was identified and removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume that because this malware has been removed the computer is now secure. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. The malware may leave so many remnants behind that security tools cannot find them. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to wipe the drive clean, reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read:

• "When should I re-format? How should I reinstall?"
• "Help: I Got Hacked. Now What Do I Do?"
• "Where to draw the line? When to recommend a format and reinstall?"
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#3 Llanlad

Llanlad
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:37 PM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 05:03 PM

Hi quietman

Really appreciate the reply ..

Just did a full scan as requested.

Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware 1.32
Database version: 1619
Windows 5.1.2600 Service Pack 2

01/05/2009 9:41:50 PM
mbam-log-2009-01-05 (21-41-50).txt

Scan type: Full Scan (C:\|D:\|E:\|)
Objects scanned: 178806
Time elapsed: 34 minute(s), 45 second(s)

Memory Processes Infected: 0
Memory Modules Infected: 0
Registry Keys Infected: 0
Registry Values Infected: 0
Registry Data Items Infected: 0
Folders Infected: 0
Files Infected: 0

Memory Processes Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Memory Modules Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Keys Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Values Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Data Items Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Folders Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Files Infected:
(No malicious items detected)


Can we just clarify a couple of things please, as ive never really had anything like this before:

1. I use online banking etc, but ive not used anything like that after i got the virus warnings, does that mean im ok or should i use another computer and change all passwords on all sites like my poker sites etc even though ive not accessed them since the virus ?

2. I thinking i should just reformat my computer to be safe, but what about my external hard drive, i have documents on that like spreadsheets, music etc that id rather not wipe, does this type of virus attach itself to my external hardrive or am i safe to continue using after formatting my computer ?

3. Please note . this is the second scan on the spin thats found nothing, although when i scanned with Ad-Aware i got this : Malware Fake Alert C:\system volume information \ _restore ( load of numbers etc )

Again . .many thanks for your help

Edited by Llanlad, 05 January 2009 - 05:04 PM.


#4 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,471 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:02:37 PM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 09:58 PM

Your decision as to what action to take should be made by reading and asking yourself the questions presented in the "When should I re-format?" and What Do I Do? links I previously provided. As I already said, in some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. Wiping your drive, reformatting, and performing a clean install of the OS or doing a factory restore removes everything and is the safest action but I cannot make that decision for you.

Reformatting a hard disk deletes all data. If you decide to reformat, you can back up all your important documents, data files and photos. The safest practice is not to backup any autorun.ini or .exe files because they may be infected. Some types of malware may disguise itself by adding and hiding its extension to the existing extension of files so be sure you take a close look at the full name. After reformatting, as a precaution, make sure you scan these files with your anti-virus prior to copying them back to your hard drive. If you use your external drive only for data files, photos, etc like I do, then you should be ok but I still recommend a thorough scanning when hooking it back up.

The infected RP***\A00*****.exe/.dll file(s) identified by your scan are in the System Volume Information Folder (SVI) which is a part of System Restore. This is the feature that allows you to set points in time to roll back your computer to a clean working state. The SVI folder is protected by permissions that only allow the system to have access and is hidden by default unless you have reconfigured Windows to show it.

System Restore will back up the good as well as the bad files so when malware is present on the system it gets included in any restore points as an A00***** file. When you scan your system with anti-virus or anti-malware tools, they may detect and place these files in quarantine. When a security program quarantines a file, that file is essentially disabled and prevented from causing any harm to your system. The quarantined file is safely held there and no longer a threat. Thereafter, you can then delete it at any time.

If the anti-virus or anti-malware tool cannot move the files to quarantine, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. To remove these file(s), the easiest thing to do is Create a New Restore Point to enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state and use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recent restore point.

If the anti-virus or anti-malware tool was able to move the files, I still recommend creating a new restore point and using disk cleanup as the last step after removing malware from an infected computer.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users