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Can't boot into Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Ubuntu


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#1 Awjvail

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 10:52 PM

I've been told to repost this in the linux section since it boots primary through Grub first.
Original post:
----

Okay so yeah. I've got a little issue.

I'm having trouble booting into any OS. I've got Vista, W7 and Ubuntu installed, and I can't boot into any of them.

I can get the Grub menu up, the Windows bootloader menu up, but it won't boot into any of them.

When I try to boot into Ubuntu: the orange bar under the Ubuntu logo goes back and forth, and then it stops and goes to some strange screen saying it's doing error checking etc. It does this forever and doesn't do anything.

When I try to boot into Windows Vista, it just sits on the Windows loading screen with " Microsoft Corporation" at the bottom and the green bar going across the screen. Does that forever, then the screen goes blank. Does nothing more.

When I try to boot into Windows 7, it first asks me to do the Windows boot repair thingy, so I do that. It sits there, does that forever, doesn't do anything. When I bypass the boot repair and go directly to boot, it does the exact same thing as Vista.

Right now I can only boot into the Ubuntu Live CD. For a time I could access my NTFS partitions on the Live CD, but now it says it can't mount them due to an unclean shut down... I can access my Ubuntu partition though.

What would be the problem? How can I fix it?

Seems to be strange that all 3 of the operating systems decide to just die at once... it worked one minute, I go to work, come back, can't boot. :'(
---
More info - I've tried booting gparted to see if I can just clear the entire disk and start over... but it won't even recognize it. I've tried the one included in the Ubuntu live CD and teh stand alone ISO I burned. Both just sit there on "Scanning hardware" forever. Nothing else happens. Also, I've tried putting in Windows XP disks because I know they allow you to format the entire disk.. but it won't even load.. it's just a black screen with a cursor on it.

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#2 Trio3b

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 11:45 PM

Has anything in your BIOS changed?
Hard drive recognized?
Changed any hdwr?
Reseat RAM?
I guess the fact that you can boot LiveCD means optical drive working OK

Common denominator to all OS's is the BIOS, hdwr, boot sector and GRUB.

Edited by Trio3b, 02 January 2009 - 11:49 PM.


#3 Awjvail

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 12:56 AM

Well.. when I go to select the boot order to select that it boot from the CD, my hard drive is still there and visible, and in the Bios it is still telling me what model drive I've got so I'm guessing the harddrive is being recognized...

I can also see all of the partitions just fine in Ubuntu.. I just can't mount the NTFS ones because of an unclean shutdown (but I could never access them without going through trouble, even when everything else was working fine), but I can access the Ubuntu partition just fine... which leads me to believe that the hard drive is working just fine as well.

I'd reseat the RAM but is it really worth the trouble considering that I can use it, and it is recognized completely by Ubuntu?

Nothing in the BIOS has changed since it stopped working or before it stopped working. I've not touched any hardware. When I went to work, my laptop was working fine, when I came home (after working a 14 hour shift, I might add), it wouldn't boot.

Edited by Awjvail, 03 January 2009 - 01:01 AM.


#4 Trio3b

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 01:18 AM

Yes access to the Ubuntu partition would indicate hd and RAM are OK. Difficulty in accessing NTFS partitions may have just been permissions issue.

Well if BIOS, HD and RAM OK then maybe something in GRUB got changed somehow. Has this setup been working fine for a while or is this triple boot relatively new?

Also, not an Ubuntu user but try booting into single user mode....when grub starts, press Esc and type e (for edit), then go to the line with the boot options and add "single" at the end. This should boot up in text mode and may tell you what it is doing or not doing to cause your no boot problem.

Edited by Trio3b, 03 January 2009 - 01:19 AM.


#5 Awjvail

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 01:44 AM

Yes this setup has been working just fine for the last few months.

I tried your single boot thingy method... didn't do anything spectacular.

#6 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 02:02 AM

I would recommend that you update your BIOS. Whom is the original manufacturer of your computer?

Dell?
HP?
Sony?
other?


If you let me know, then I can help you get a BIOS update, or you can go to the support section of your manufacturer's website and search for the update there. Most manufacturers keep bios updates on file for all systems they manufacture.

The BIOS tells you different information about your computer such as processor type, memory, hard drive, BIOS date, and display.

When you get new hardware, you should always search for a BIOS update from your manufacturer, depending if the computer is new or not, that is. When the BIOS is out-of-date in relation to new hardware, it will cause errors or malfunctions in the computer OS itself.

TASK: UPDATE BIOS

Edited by Jay-P VIP, 03 January 2009 - 02:03 AM.


#7 Awjvail

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 02:14 AM

I've got a Toshiba Satellite A200-AH7.

I'm 99.99999% sure that the BIOS are up to date as I checked a few months ago but feel free to see if you can dig up something more recent :thumbsup:

#8 Trio3b

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 02:25 AM

Yes this setup has been working just fine for the last few months.

I tried your single boot thingy method... didn't do anything spectacular.


So no text boot? No error messages?

If you are able to access the ext3 partitions via LiveCD are there any messages in /var/log/message ( or wherever Ubuntu keeps them).

The only thing I can think of that would cause a sudden change is an unattended or unintentional update that has altered your boot loader.

Edited by Trio3b, 03 January 2009 - 02:37 AM.


#9 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 05:53 AM

You have a corrupted boot loader most likely caused by a bootstrapper virus.

It looks like a boot sector infection caused by a computer virus. It is common for this to happen if the virus has been on your system for a long period of time, or the virus launched from a file on a pirated/bootleg software disk.

If I am thinking correctly, this one may have changed your volume label which explains why you cannot boot in to Vista. The bad part about multi-partitioned computers is that when a boot sector infection occurs, it hurts all of the OS's on the computer. The first sector and MBR (hard-drive area) are the one's that are infected if this is the case.

This is a rather lengthy repair.

On a clean computer please download the following and burn it on to a CD. This is Dr. Web LiveCD. Make sure your computer can boot from CD drive, then after this is burned and ready, you may go ahead with the scan. LiveCD Page

#10 Andrew

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 04:31 PM

I tend to disagree with the suggestion of a boot-sector virus. All the OS's start to load and GRUB seems to be unaffected. My theory is that an unclean shutdown or incomplete startup of one of the Windows systems has caused some sort of internal inconsistency on one or more NTFS partitions (they are marked as being 'dirty'). It has been my experience that severe inconsistencies in an NTFS partition can cause Ubuntu to fail to boot in normal mode if those partitions are automounted via fstab.

Most Linux distributions which support read/write access to NTFS partitions do so using the NTFS-3G/FUSE driver. NTFS-3G supports only partial journaling (a key component for maintaining filesystem integrity) and therefore will not mount drives marked as being potentially dirty, for data safety reasons. The only way of fixing this is to use Windows' chkdsk utility to correct filesystem errors.

In your case, booting into Windows normally is not an option. Some things to try:

1. Booting Windows in Safe Mode then running chkdsk on all NTFS drives.
2. Booting from your Windows CD/DVD and using the Recovery Console to run chkdsk (I am unsure as to whether the Vista or Windows 7 DVD's have the recovery console on them. Does anyone know?)
3. Booting a third-party boot disk which contains chkdsk. (For example, UBCD4Win.)

You may also try booting Ubuntu in single-user mode (you tried and were successful once already, I believe) and then editing the fstab file so that the NTFS partitions are not automounted. This won't fix the problem with loading Windows but should allow you to boot Ubuntu normally. If you want to do this, please say so and we'll walk you through the steps of navigating the single-user shell to edit the fstab file.

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 03 January 2009 - 04:33 PM.


#11 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 08:43 PM

If this is the case Amazing Andrew:

I can also see all of the partitions just fine in Ubuntu.. I just can't mount the NTFS ones because of an unclean shutdown (but I could never access them without going through trouble, even when everything else was working fine), but I can access the Ubuntu partition just fine... which leads me to believe that the hard drive is working just fine as well.


Then his entire file system is corrupted due to how dirty it had become. The reason I state this is because if you see above in the quote from an earlier post of Awjvail, it shows that the boot got harmed from an unclean shutdown. Awjvail, I am only going out on a limb here, but I would venture to say that your File system has been dirty for a long period of time.

Awjvail, this leads Amazing Andrew and I (Jay-P VIP) to believe that your file system is corrupted and needs to be checked for errors. Although it may not exactly be the virus case, I do believe that Amazing Andrew's compromise will work better.

Awjvail, Are you able/Do you know how to run CHKDSK?


(EDIT: Few name changes/misspellings)

Edited by Jay-P VIP, 03 January 2009 - 08:45 PM.


#12 Awjvail

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 11:23 PM

If this is the case Amazing Andrew:

I can also see all of the partitions just fine in Ubuntu.. I just can't mount the NTFS ones because of an unclean shutdown (but I could never access them without going through trouble, even when everything else was working fine), but I can access the Ubuntu partition just fine... which leads me to believe that the hard drive is working just fine as well.


Then his entire file system is corrupted due to how dirty it had become. The reason I state this is because if you see above in the quote from an earlier post of Awjvail, it shows that the boot got harmed from an unclean shutdown. Awjvail, I am only going out on a limb here, but I would venture to say that your File system has been dirty for a long period of time.

Awjvail, this leads Amazing Andrew and I (Jay-P VIP) to believe that your file system is corrupted and needs to be checked for errors. Although it may not exactly be the virus case, I do believe that Amazing Andrew's compromise will work better.

Awjvail, Are you able/Do you know how to run CHKDSK?


(EDIT: Few name changes/misspellings)


Yes, I know how to run CHKDSK. It is just a matter of finding the disks.. I don't think the recent Windows disks have the recovery console on them... so I've got to dig out my old Windows 98 disks.... which are in a pile somewhere :thumbsup:

BTW whoever said that I was successful in booting into Ubuntu in Single User mode, this is not the case. It just did the same thing that it does when I boot regularly.... the orange bar goes from side to side, then stops before it starts to load and goes to a black screen.

I also can't boot into safe mode in windows.

Here is my /var/log/messages file. The interesting part is towards the bottom.. the log seems to stop on the day that it stopped working so I don't know how much useful information you will get from it.

Since I can't attach it, here it is: http://www.2shared.com/file/4576486/3e928eaa/messages.html

Edited by Awjvail, 03 January 2009 - 11:28 PM.


#13 BlackSpyder

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 12:02 AM

There was an error somewhere between when in worked and when it didnt work.

Ubuntu spotted the error and is trying to repair it using it's version of Checkdisk. It can and will take some time to do this (it usually takes me 30 min to do so).

Windows also noted this error and is attempting to do the same thing.

Note: Ubuntu does a Hard Drive check at random intervals or when an error is found. Stopping the Hard Drive Check can cause errors (to be repaired usually on the next bootup but can make Windows act funny if Windows is used in between)

Few things that would be helpful:

1) Last OS used before issue began
2) Hard Drive Setup (1 partitioned drive for all OS's or each OS on a seperate drive)

Finally, I trust you but I'm not downloading anything. Please Copy and Paste and use code tags

Edited by BlackSpyder, 04 January 2009 - 12:03 AM.

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#14 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 08:21 PM

Boot in to GRUB and press ESC, then enter the recovery console. Choose fsck and allow it to fully check everything.

The use this tutorial How to automatically repair Windows Vista using Startup Repair to help you out for Vista.

[EDIT: Tutorial title]

Edited by Jay-P VIP, 04 January 2009 - 08:22 PM.


#15 czhang

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 09:00 PM

I had the same thing happened to me not long ago. I had XP Pro on HD 1, Vista (Later Windows 7 Beta, both 64 bit) on Partition 1 of HD 2, and Ubuntu 8.10 on Partition 2 of HD 2. However, when I installed Vista (/7 Beta) and Ubuntu, the XP HD was also connected, and the installation changed the bootloader on HD 1 (i.e., the MBR in HD 1). For some time, I can boot into all three OSs. The nightmare began when I ran Windows Update in XP Pro. It somehow messed up the MBR on HD 1 (i.e., the GRUB program), and I cannot boot into any one of the OSs.

According to my experience, the easiest way perhaps is to reinstall Windows 7 Beta into its partition again. This will probably correct the bootloader problem, and you will be able to boot into both XP and 7. However, you will not be able to boot into Ubuntu. I have tried this twice: I used 7 Tools Partition Manager 2009 to make hard drive raw copy of my computer hard drive having XP Pro and 7 beta and Ubuntu, and the hard drive copy will not boot initially (probably because the original HD's MBR was messed up before and I somehow managed to correct part of the problem). Then I installed Windows 7 Beta into its old partition again, and Windows 7 Beta recognized the old XP Pro partition, and corrected the bootloader problem. Then I can boot into both XP Pro and 7 Beta, but not the Ubuntu partition.

By the way, I would definitely separate Windows OSs completely from Ubuntu when installing Ubuntu, i.e., install Ubuntu onto an isolated Hard drive. Only after the installation should one connect hard drives having Windows OSs or Ubuntu together to the motherboard. Then one can use the BIOS setup to choose which hard drive to boot. It seems that Windows love to mess with the MBR, esp. if GRUB is installed.

Edited by czhang, 30 January 2009 - 09:03 PM.





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