Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Win 7 Will Lets MS Track Your Every Move


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 siljaline

siljaline

    Security Expert


  • Members
  • 141 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:23 AM

Posted 01 January 2009 - 10:28 AM

A good third-party point-of-view, not mine, Here
siljaline

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 MilesAhead

MilesAhead

  • Members
  • 197 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:23 PM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 12:54 AM

A good third-party point-of-view, not mine, Here


They already bought Hotmail so the game was over a long time ago. :huh:

"I don't want to belong to any club that would have me as a member."
- Groucho Marx


#3 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 January 2009 - 03:12 AM

I seriously doubt that tracking the every move is possible, but I do know they monitor your operating system. This can be easily recognized back when Windows XP came out.

#4 siljaline

siljaline

    Security Expert

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 141 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male

Posted 05 January 2009 - 09:59 AM

I seriously doubt that tracking the every move is possible, but I do know they monitor your operating system. This can be easily recognized back when Windows XP came out.

Agreed, it was and continues to be a serious "phone home" issue. When I was running Kerio Firewall v2.15 in-the-day, you wouldn't have believed the rule-set that I had to create and tend to minimize my OS from phoning Microsoft at every turn.
siljaline

#5 Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 January 2009 - 10:28 AM

Gee, and I thought I was being paranoid about Google Earth. It keeps installing on my IE7, although I keep disabling it and resetting my preferences on the Google updater. I originally eliminated it because it's a resource hog, but it comes with 2 other features that I definitely don't want for other reasons.

I think it has more to do with governmental security concerns and also with software companies spying on commercial rivals and on potential rivals. Incidentally, I have had more problems with Google updater since enrolling with a pre-paid credit card company (GreenDot). If you access through the listed internet address, you get "TalkGold", which is based in Nigeria! The bank listed as handling the card is Columbus Bank and Trust in the U.S., and that is the bank listed on all the legitimate e-mails. To get the information you need, it is vital to keep the e-mail updates to use the link there.

I went to college in the early '70's. I remember watching some of the Nixon Watergate hearings. The science fiction writers have been raising these concerns for many years. And, no, I don't keep up with the authors who specialize in conspiracy theories; Phillip K. Dick was scary enough. PBS Masterpiece contemporary recently aired an excellent 5-part thriller on government tracking of individuals via computer apps, The Final Enemy. Not all the U.K. government's intentions were benign in that story, which takes place in the very near future. There was also a massive cover-up involving contaminated vaccines in Afghanistan, an international aid agency, murders of numerous microbiologists, and dna targeted microbial agents. The government tracking program, which used id chips in cards, turned out to be much more pervasive and sinister than most in the government and all of the public realize.

#6 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 January 2009 - 01:54 PM

I seriously doubt that tracking the every move is possible, but I do know they monitor your operating system. This can be easily recognized back when Windows XP came out.

Agreed, it was and continues to be a serious "phone home" issue. When I was running Kerio Firewall v2.15 in-the-day, you wouldn't have believed the rule-set that I had to create and tend to minimize my OS from phoning Microsoft at every turn.


:huh:

Yes! I thought my privacy was violated with Windows Vista User Account Control. I just had to get rid of UAC. I requested a solution from Microsoft immediately to help turn it off because it kept terminating programs, due to a bad-coding for UAC by applications.

#7 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,250 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:11:23 AM

Posted 05 January 2009 - 01:57 PM

Vista is full of tracking software and home-phoneing. something like 17 programs were built into Vista that phoned home regularly for various purposes. XP was prone to download "updates" even when told not to, leading sometimes to undesireable results like breaking your computer. WGA, for example, was a bad idea that got foisted onto unwitting users.

#8 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 January 2009 - 02:23 PM

Vista is full of tracking software and home-phoneing. something like 17 programs were built into Vista that phoned home regularly for various purposes. XP was prone to download "updates" even when told not to, leading sometimes to undesireable results like breaking your computer. WGA, for example, was a bad idea that got foisted onto unwitting users.




The video above shows a typical Windows Vista error that made Windows Vista one of the worst creations in computer software, IF the UAC and Windows Firewall was still enabled. Oh and Yes, Windows Firewall caused problems as well.

#9 Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 January 2009 - 06:06 PM

I have been having download problems since mid-October and tried several restores, Secunia recommendations, etc. Still having problems. And I have noticed many people posting here wondering whether their Windows installers might be infected. Is this often the result of Microsoft carelessness or incompetence, and not infection? there seem to be more and more problems cropping up, which I read about at BC and have some of them myself, which look and act like infections, but which may not be? Could much of this just be the result of poor programming, coupled with a desire to know what MS/IE users are doing and where they are going? Like trying to develop weak viruses, not for innoculation purposes, but to maintain a low level infection--which ends up cr*pping everything up royally. Maybe the windows security systems would read these as permissible, but us unpredictable users insist on buying or downloading all this security software from other companies and organizations.

I am way over my head in this discussion with you guys. I have been trying to figure out what's going on with my computer so I can get a log submitted without it taking the tech an inordinate amount of time to assist me, and this topic caught my eye. My all-seeing eye--MWAHH-HA-HA!

#10 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 05 January 2009 - 07:42 PM

I will admit, not having UAC on has improved the performance of my laptop up 32%.

What I like about the new ReadyBoost system is the availability to run larger amounts of RAM and using non-volatile flash memory to run the system at better performance. What very many users did not know, is that you can run memory with different bus speeds. This means that if you want a 4 GB system, but want it to perform well but not too fast, you can place in one 2 GB 667MHz and one 2 GB 800MHz.

#11 Erik365

Erik365

  • Members
  • 33 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:rochester, ny

Posted 07 January 2009 - 08:40 PM

Just for those of you who think is not possible to track "every" move it is there are single programs that track everything. One of the is called spector and it is a computer killer and a person killer any thing that is done on that computer is logged. It makes a video of every thing you do. It records everything from keystrokes to websites visited

#12 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 07 January 2009 - 11:03 PM

AND THIS MY FRIEND...

Just for those of you who think is not possible to track "every" move it is there are single programs that track everything. One of the is called spector and it is a computer killer and a person killer any thing that is done on that computer is logged. It makes a video of every thing you do. It records everything from keystrokes to websites visited


IS MALICIOUS SOFTWARE!

--------------------------------------------------

Read this privacy statement for Windows Defender. As you see it, Microsoft only collects some data. http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/...vacypolicy.mspx

Edited by Jay-P VIP, 07 January 2009 - 11:03 PM.


#13 Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 08 January 2009 - 12:34 AM

I don't think Google or MS are tracking every move and every click, but I do think they are being intrusive in trying to gather way too much information, for whatever reasons. The Final Enemy is a cautionary thriller, not reality, although the U.K. does have many, many more surveillance cameras in place than does the U.S. There are movements in some U.S. locales to install more surveillance cameras in at least some neighborhoods, because of despair at high crime rates and fear of being possible terrorist targets.

Search engines and other private user applications have been used in China to keep a close eye on dissidents. Who's to say that in the free countries, individual's internet and phone records are not being flagged because of inadvertent or innocent contacts with suspect countries? There should be something equivalent to the Freedom of Information Act, which can be applied much more quickly, to see what the status of one's files are. Remember all the poor Americans who happen to share names which were assumed by suspected terrorists, and have been repeatedly pulled aside for questioning at airports? One fellow was a boy about 6 or 8 years old, a little anglo-american boy. The airport security suspected terrorist list keeps growing like mushrooms, and no one has made a serious attempt to cut them back.

Paranoia is not in order, but a wary eye certainly is.

Of course, this doesn't have a lot to do with the topic in this thread of how this new application works, and how it can eat up a lot of resources. At least, I think that's the topic--I'm not tech-informed enough to understand it

#14 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 08 January 2009 - 05:39 AM

You are right, especially so they can improve their products.

Paranoia is not in order, but a wary eye certainly is.

- Very nice observation, by the way!

#15 Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

Guest_fuzzywuzzy6_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 08 January 2009 - 12:08 PM

From a commercial standpoint, it is not just so they can improve their products, but to benefit those companies they have found cooperation with beneficial in the past, and those they expect to profit from in the future. The software companies are probably selling/sharing information with other corporations in ways they don't want the consumers to know about. Cookies aren't just about giving permissions (both ways), they're about building profiles and lists, that can then be sold.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users