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Internet Explorer and Firefox are not openening


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Jkesler42

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 04:25 PM

When I click the icons on the desktop or in windows explorer they will not open up. I am using Windows XP SP3 and IE6. The processes appear in the task manager, but they just sit there.

I have tried disabling all startup programs and services and the browsers will then open up but without a connection. I can connect perfectly fine in safe mode. I just removed Antivirus Pro 2009 and was thinking it may have something to do with that. I do not currently have access to the PC in question but am able to contact someone that does. I feel that I am just missing something simple. Please help!

Thank you for your time.

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#2 xblindx

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 06:56 PM

Restart the computer, and before opening anything check task manager (ctr+alt+delete) for either firefox.exe or iexplore.exe. If either is present, you may have the Poison Ivy Rootkit.

May want to read the article here. It explains possible causes of your issue, and also how to determine if you have the Poison Ivy Rootkit.

#3 Jkesler42

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 07:03 PM

Neither are present before I attempt to open them.

#4 xblindx

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 07:06 PM

Still take a look at the article.

#5 Jkesler42

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 10:24 PM

Ok. Tried the solutions included and nothing. Thanks though.

#6 Jkesler42

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 12:51 PM

Problem Solved!!! Ran Superantispyware and it found a rootkit called KInject-A. Got rid of it and poof it works. Thanks for your help guys.

#7 xblindx

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 12:53 PM

My rootkit suggestion was correct then :thumbsup: You may still have infections, I would feel more comfortable if you posted in the Am I Infected? section. The reason being that you had a rootkit.

These items are part of a very nasty rootkit.

IMPORTANT NOTE: One or more of the identified infections was related to a rootkit component. Rootkits and backdoor Trojan are very dangerous because they use advanced techniques (backdoors) as a means of accessing a computer system that bypasses security mechanisms and steal sensitive information which they send back to the hacker. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. Remote attackers use backdoor Trojans and rootkits as part of an exploit to gain unauthorized access to a computer and take control of it without your knowledge.

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, all passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed by using a different computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach. Because your computer was compromised please read How Do I Handle Possible Identify Theft, Internet Fraud and CC Fraud?

Although the rootkit was identified and removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume that because the rootkit has been removed the computer is now secure. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. The malware may leave so many remnants behind that security tools cannot find them. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to wipe the drive clean, reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read:

? "When should I re-format? How should I reinstall?"
? "Help: I Got Hacked. Now What Do I Do?"
? "Where to draw the line? When to recommend a format and reinstall?"




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