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Get Rid of Unwanted Cookies


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5 replies to this topic

#1 carsonite

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 11:21 PM

It seems like that at every new Web page I visit, I get hit with ten or so tracking cookies. These include tribalvision, euroclick, yieldmanager, atdmt, questionmarket, zedo, advertising, fastclick, serving.svs, doubleclick, etc. Windows Defender is supposedly shielding my PC from these cookies, but what can I do to eliminate these annoyances?

I was attacked by cyberlog-x, zlob trojans, and AntiVirus 2009 this weekend. I've spent 36 hours trying to clean up the devastating effects of these aggravating side effects of Web surfing.

I don't know if the cookies mentioned above are remnants of the trojans or are just separate attacks.

I would appreciate help in restoring my Dell Latitude D820 to its prior state of usefulness.

Thanks,

Rusty

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#2 garmanma

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 08:43 AM

Please download Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and save it to your desktop.
  • Make sure you are connected to the Internet.
  • Double-click on mbam-setup.exe to install the application.
  • When the installation begins, follow the prompts and do not make any changes to default settings.
  • When installation has finished, make sure you leave both of these checked:
    • Update Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
    • Launch Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
  • Then click Finish.
  • MBAM will automatically start and you will be asked to update the program before performing a scan. If an update is found, the program will automatically update itself. Press the OK button to close that box and continue. If you encounter any problems while downloading the updates, manually download them from here and just double-click on mbam-rules.exe to install.
  • On the Scanner tab:
    • Make sure the "Perform Quick Scan" option is selected.
    • Then click on the Scan button.
  • If asked to select the drives to scan, leave all the drives selected and click on the Start Scan button.
  • The scan will begin and "Scan in progress" will show at the top. It may take some time to complete so please be patient.
  • When the scan is finished, a message box will say "The scan completed successfully. Click 'Show Results' to display all objects found".
  • Click OK to close the message box and continue with the removal process.
  • Back at the main Scanner screen, click on the Show Results button to see a list of any malware that was found.
  • Make sure that everything is checked, and click Remove Selected.
  • When removal is completed, a log report will open in Notepad.
  • The log is automatically saved and can be viewed by clicking the Logs tab in MBAM.
  • Copy and paste the contents of that report in your next reply and exit MBAM.
Note: If MBAM encounters a file that is difficult to remove, you may be asked to reboot your computer so it can proceed with the disinfection process. Regardless if prompted to restart the computer or not, please do so immediately. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware. MBAM may make changes to your registry as part of its disinfection routine. If you're using other security programs that detect registry changes, they may alert you after scanning with MBAM. Please permit the program to allow the changes.
Mark
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why won't my laptop work?

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#3 carsonite

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 01:57 AM

Following is a copy of the log report from my most recent scan:

Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware 1.31
Database version: 1563
Windows 5.1.2600 Service Pack 3

12/29/2008 10:50:04 PM
mbam-log-2008-12-29 (22-50-04).txt

Scan type: Quick Scan
Objects scanned: 60077
Time elapsed: 24 minute(s), 33 second(s)

Memory Processes Infected: 0
Memory Modules Infected: 0
Registry Keys Infected: 0
Registry Values Infected: 0
Registry Data Items Infected: 0
Folders Infected: 0
Files Infected: 1

Memory Processes Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Memory Modules Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Keys Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Values Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Data Items Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Folders Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Files Infected:
C:\Pass2.cmd (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.

Thanks for any assistance,

Rusty

#4 garmanma

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 11:20 AM

Not bad, try one more time to be sure



Open MBAM and click Update tab, select Check for Updates,when done
click Scanner tab,select FULL scan and scan.
After scan click Remove Selected, Post new scan log and Reboot.
Mark
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why won't my laptop work?

Having grandkids is God's way of giving you a 2nd chance because you were too busy working your butt off the 1st time around
Do not send me PMs with problems that should be posted in the forums. Keep it in the forums, so everyone benefits
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#5 carsonite

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 02:40 AM

Here are the results from my Full Scan. As you can see, this scan took 1 hour, 42 mins. Is this normal for 94,333 objects scanned, at 54 mbps?

Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware 1.31
Database version: 1580
Windows 5.1.2600 Service Pack 3

12/30/2008 11:31:28 PM
mbam-log-2008-12-30 (23-31-28).txt

Scan type: Full Scan (C:\|)
Objects scanned: 94333
Time elapsed: 1 hour(s), 42 minute(s), 16 second(s)

Memory Processes Infected: 0
Memory Modules Infected: 0
Registry Keys Infected: 0
Registry Values Infected: 0
Registry Data Items Infected: 0
Folders Infected: 0
Files Infected: 0

Memory Processes Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Memory Modules Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Keys Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Values Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Data Items Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Folders Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Files Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

I still keep getting several of the persistent tracking cookies pop up (Advertising, HitBox, Yieldmanager, ADRevolver, etc.). I set these sites to Block status in the tools, Internet Options, Privacy section of IE.

Thanks for your help,

Rusty

#6 quietman7

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 08:46 AM

The speed of an anti-virus or anti-malware scan depends on a variety of factors.
  • The program itself and how its scanning engine is designed to scan: using a signature database vs heuristic scanning for suspicious behavior or a combination of both.
  • Options to scan for spyware, adware, riskware and potentially unwanted or unsafe programs (PUPs).
  • Options to scan memory, boot sectors, registry and alternate data streams (ADS).
  • Type of scan performed: Deep, Quick or Custom scanning.
  • What action has to be performed when malware is detected.
  • A computer's hard drive size.
  • Disk used capacity (number of files to include temporary files) that have to be scanned.
  • Types of files (.exe, .dll, .sys, archives, email, etc) that are scanned.
  • Whether external drives are included in the scan.
  • Competition for and utilization of system resources by the scanner.
  • Other running processes and programs in the background.
  • Interference from malware.
  • Interference from the user.
Cookies are text string messages given to a Web browser by a Web server. Whenever you visit a web page or navigate different pages with your browser, the web site generates a unique ID number which your browser stores in a text (cookie) file that is sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from that server. Cookies allow third-party providers such as ad serving networks, spyware or adware providers to track personal information. The main purpose of cookies is to identify users and prepare customized Web pages for them.

The type of cookie that is a cause for some concern are "tracking cookies" because they can be considered a privacy risk. These types of cookies are used to track your Web browsing habits (your movement from site to site). Ad companies use them to record your activity on all sites where they have placed ads. They can keep count of how many times you visited a web page, store your username and password so you don't have to log in and retain your custom settings. When you visit one of these sites, a cookie is placed on your computer. Each time you visit another site that hosts one of their ads, that same cookie is read, and soon they have assembled a list of which of their sites you have visited and which of their ads that you have clicked on. They are used all over the Internet and advertisement companies often plant them whenever your browser loads one of their banners. Cookies are NOT a "threat". As text files they cannot be executed to cause any damage. Cookies do not cause any pop ups nor do they install malware.

As long as you surf the Internet, you are going to get cookies and some of your security programs will flag them for removal. However, you can minimize this by reading "Blocking & Managing Unwanted Cookies" and "Block Third-Party Cookies in IE7".

Edited by quietman7, 31 December 2008 - 08:47 AM.

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