Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

screen/monitor issues


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 shell5

shell5

  • Members
  • 78 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:00 AM

Posted 28 December 2008 - 03:22 AM

My screen has suddenly started to get slowly larger moving outwards then suddenly flicks off and starts the process again. Is this my monitor telling me it is dusty/dirty/hot or old and in need of replacing or is it some form of virus.
When this happens I shut down the monitor and leave for awhile and all works well for about 15 minutes or so. When all is working there appears to be no other problems with computer.

thanks in advance :thumbsup:

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:08:00 PM

Posted 28 December 2008 - 04:11 AM

Am I right in guessing this is a CRT (Picture Tube) type monitor, not an LCD?

If it is, sounds like you're describing a fault called "blooming", which is caused by either the High Tension voltage to the CRT falling, or the monitor's PSU voltage rail rising, either way the monitor's protection is triggered by the faulty operation. You can confirm that the fault is internal to the monitor by running it on another computer system and checking that the condition still occurs.

If this is the fault you're experiencing, then the monitor will sooner or later fail completely. It may be worth repairing (now, not if it fails completely) depending on the age and quality of the unit, but more likely it could cost more than can be justified, considering the modest cost of reasonable LCD monitors these days.

Edited by Platypus, 28 December 2008 - 04:14 AM.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#3 shell5

shell5
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 78 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:00 AM

Posted 28 December 2008 - 05:00 AM

Yes it is an old version monitor, at least 6 years old so ancient in computer terms, looks like a shopping trip for a nice fancy flat screen new monitor, what a shame!

Thanks for the speedy reply

#4 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:08:00 PM

Posted 28 December 2008 - 05:06 AM

You're welcome.

Is the computer system of similar age? If so, I suggest checking if the video card fitted has limitations to the video resolutions it can support in comparison with likely native resolutions of LCD monitors. For example some folk have found an older video card may not have 1440x900 available to match some widescreen LCDs.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users