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replacing an AGP Nvidia GeForce FX 5200 video card (128M)


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#1 Dostari

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 11:16 PM

Christmas night I started noticing my video going funky - garbled window edges, failure to repaint screen on moving, long delays in response, and monitor seeming to switch modes (click on and off momentarily) at times it shouldn't need to - and frequently. And within World of Warcraft, a lot of textures would randomly garble.

To test that it was the card, and not the monitor, or malware, etc, I removed my old Diamond Viper V770 Ultra PCI card from my 9-year old Micron and restarted the PC with that card in, and the AGP card removed, after having changed the BIOS video setting from "AGP" to "Auto" (with guidance from my friend, otherwise I would not have known to do that). The older PCI card is working fine and everything is "back to normal". But of course, it's a much less capable card, unable to support World of Warcraft, the main game I play on this PC.

(FYI, it looks like 2 of the 4 capacitors on this card have discharged, which I'm assuming is why it began to fail. On the advice of my friend, I haven't put the failing card back in since he said there's a small chance the capacitors could explode).

So I simply need to get a replacement AGP card so I can play Warcraft again on this PC, but here is my problem: I don't know where to look or what to look for. I need advice on what cards can effectively replace the failing card. It needs to work with my current Dell Dimension 8300, which is about 5 years old. I've done google searches and searches on amazon for AGP cards, but I don't know what I need to know to order one I know will work. I just need one as good as the nvidia, or possibly a little better - but all I really care about is that it works in my PC and runs WoW.

What information can I provide so someone can help guide me? From my research, video cards sometimes list a power supply requirement. I checked the sticker on the power supply and it looks like mine is 250W. Apart from that, I don't know what specs are important. I think my PC only supports AGP 4x, but I really don't know for sure, or how to check to be sure, or even what that means.

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 04:09 AM

Since you didn't tell us what card you had in the AGP slot, it will be difficult to choose a similar card. However, given the age of the PC, it shouldn't be too difficult to find a suitable card. Your limiting factor will be the power supply, many cards suggest higher than 250W. Most GeForce 7 cards require 400W, and GeForce 6 requires 300W. It doesn't get much better with ATI, their cards typically use more power than NVidia's cards, especially the HD 3000 line which uses 550W. Even ATI's x1000 cards require 300W or more. I suggest getting a more powerful power supply and graphics card.

Suggested power supply: Thermaltake Purepower W0100RU 500W ATX 12V 2.0 Power Supply - It will provide enough power. $59 (before a $30 mail-in rebate)

Suggested Graphics Cards (when paired with the suggested power supply)
POWERCOLOR HD2600XT 512M AGP Radeon HD 2600XT - Make sure you download the drivers from ATI's website before installing. $60
SAPPHIRE 100175L Radeon X1650PRO 512MB - A good card. $61
BFG Tech BFGE73512GT GeForce 7300GT 512MB - Another good card. I think this one would be best given the power requirements, noise, heat, and your gameplay choices. $74

Edited by DJBPace07, 28 December 2008 - 04:11 AM.

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#3 Dostari

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 04:15 AM

The name of the card I am trying to replace is in the thread title: 128M Nvidia GeForce FX 5200

So there's no way to replace this card without replacing the power supply? That sounds like a daunting task, and I'm a novice when it comes to hardware. How hard is that to replace? How easy is it to mess up? What are the risks?

#4 hamluis

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 10:03 AM

Take a look: http://www.bizrate.com/graphicscards/produ...d__sort--5.html

FWIW: Bizrate.com is a decent site for quickly getting comparative retail prices of components, in addition to www.newegg.com and www.tigerdirect.com, IMO.

Louis

#5 DJBPace07

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 05:19 PM

Replacing a power supply isn't too difficult. Just disconnect the power from the internal components, unscrew then pull out the old power supply, unscrew and remove the faceplate from the old unit, screw the faceplate onto the new unit and slide it into the PC, reconnect the power cables, and you're done. The first time I did it, it took about 15 minutes. Or, you can repurchase your old, old card again. There is a slightly better model of the GeForce FX 5xxx series. You can get the GeForce FX 5500, which has more memory and is slightly faster than your old card. Or, you can get your original FX 5200 again. Both of the cards cost almost the same at Amazon, so I suggest getting more for your money and purchasing the FX 5500.

Edited by DJBPace07, 28 December 2008 - 05:19 PM.

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#6 Dostari

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 04:15 PM

Thanks. I did a little research on-line about replacing the power supply - it did look pretty straightforward.

Still, I'd like to keep things as simple as possible. That 5500 sounds promising - would it work in my machine? I think my motherboard is a Dell 0M2035. Would it be compatible with that and the 250W psu be adequate? I reviewed the amazon info and nothing there is conclusive (to me at least). The fact that it's close to my card in time and capability is what gives me hope.

#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 07:32 PM

250 watts will be cutting it very close, even your old 5200 would be pushing the limit. I don't suggest overclocking the card, but the stock specifications should work. There is also an EVGA 256-P1-N399-LX GeForce 6200 256MB card that will work with your power requirements. Or, at least that's what is says on the box and at eVGA's website. It is a GeForce 6 card, the successor to the GeForce FX 5. It does, however, require PCI not AGP and since it has no fans (it is passively cooled) there should be plenty of airflow in the case. Your PC is getting old and will need to be upgraded or scrapped eventually. If you plan on keeping the PC for a while longer, it might be worth getting a new power supply.

FX 5500 Overclocking w/ 250PSU

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#8 Dostari

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 02:34 PM

Well the 5500 arrived today and I can't get it to work. When I boot up, the monitor stays dead. I swapped in the PCI I have been using and switched the BIOS setting to AGP thinking it was that, and that made no difference. The fan on the card runs. Any ideas what's wrong?

#9 DJBPace07

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 04:10 PM

Can you install any other AGP cards into your PC? If you have a friend that will let you, have them install the 5500 into their PC to see if the card works. It's possible that the AGP slot could be failing.

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#10 Dostari

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 10:39 PM

I took it to a local computer shop and they tried several things, including a 400W psu, other AGP cards in my machine (which they were unable to later identify when I asked), and my new 5500 in a different computer. They said the card did work, and they were able to get other AGP cards to work in my PC. So their conclusion was that the slot was OK, and the psu was OK, and the motherboard is incompatible with the new card. Unfortunately, when I asked them for details about what I should be looking for to make sure a new card is compatible, they didn't seem to have any details. So I'm back at square one.

#11 DJBPace07

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 12:53 AM

What a temperamental computer you have! You could always try standard PCI cards, but they are slower. Or, you can revert back to the 5200.

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