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upgrade from pentium 4 2.4 to 3.0


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#1 monkeydog

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 12:29 PM

I have a gateway E4000 with an intel pentium 4 2.4 GHz and 512 MB RAM. (the case says its a 500s, but system info and belarc both identify it as an E4000) I'd like to replace the cpu with at least a pentium 4 3.0 or higher and of course add memory and perhaps a new hard drive.

I've been looking all over the web, and I find all kinds of info on adding memory, but having no luck finding out about upgrading the cpu. So I'm wondering, on this machine is it possible to upgrade the cpu to at least a 3.0 ? Also, does anyone know of any good resources that will help me with making sure I'm doing this right- such as will I need a new power supply, cooling system, motherboard, etc. I hate to purchase something and then find that it won't work unless I replace something else first, you know what I mean?

Sure appreciate any ideas,

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 04:18 PM

I would suggest that a motherboard/CPU replacement is a better investment.

Pentium processors are old hat, they are not going to be coming back. Rather than patch (which is what I think putting a P4 processor in would be), why not try to upgrade and get more value for the dollars you are going to spend?

I don't mean to sound as if I am disparaging Pentiums...they still work. But the newer processors offer/provide much more in terms of capabilities and the prices of a reasonable upgrade are not outrageous, IMO. A lot has changed in 6 years.

I'm not trying to encourage you to buy a quad-core upgrade to do mundane things...I'm just saying that P4s are the past and...if I were to advise anyone how to spend their money, I would never even think of telling them to buy a P4 processor today or tomorrow.

FWIW: Intel 845 chipset, Socket 478 processor.

Newegg reflects a grand total of 478-pin CPU, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819116027

Tiger Direct reflects a total of zero of such.

Buying one via eBay is an option that I would not take, easier to just move up.

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#3 DJBPace07

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 04:45 PM

I say get rid of the Pentium 4 and get a new motherboard, CPU, and RAM. Even the lower end Core 2's, Phenoms, and Athlons will beat the performance of a Pentium 4. I was going to do a similar upgrade on a PC. The processor was going to be a Phenom, 8GB of RAM, and a new motherboard. The upgrades would have cost about $300. I decided to hold off until about mid Jan.

Edited by DJBPace07, 27 December 2008 - 04:46 PM.

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#4 monkeydog

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 08:54 PM

Thanks for the ideas. Something I don't understand though- I've read some reviews comparing the pentium 4 3.4GHZ with the AMD64 3200 and unless I'm misunderstanding something, they are saying that the two are quite close in comparison. However, is'nt the AMD64 3200 just in the 2-3GHz range?

If that is so...are the AMD's just that much faster even though less amount of GHz? What cpu would you recomend that would deliver the same or better performance than the 3.4 ghz pentium 4 at a similar cost? I also understand that the 3.4 GHz pentiums run very hot, If I go with a comparable AMD, will I need to be concerned with a new cooling system?

Thanks again for your help and for your patience if my questions seem sophomoric!

#5 dpunisher

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 09:54 PM

Something to bear in mind, the P4 is a fairly inefficient processor. That's one reason Intel dropped them. The others were the horrible thermal performance and power demands. P4s were the whole reason the PR/performance rating was introduced by AMD (although they won't admit it directly). AMD processors were more efficient, and did the same amount of work at a lower clockspeed. THe P4 was designed for high clocks. and its pipelines and other chip architecture were designed for that purpose, to the exclusion of almost everything else. Enhancements like "SSE" were implemented to overcome the limitations of the chip. Intel marketing figured (rightly so) that people buy MHz, not actual performance. To be fair, certain programs (Photoshop for one) were heavily optimized for SSE insruction sets and always did well with P4s, but it was hit or miss with other programs.

Comparing another brand/series to a P4 is apples to oranges. The AMD processors (Athlon/Athlon 64 family) are more efficient, and the Intel Core2 processors are more efficient than the AMDs. Aint competition great?

Edited by dpunisher, 27 December 2008 - 09:56 PM.

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#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 03:22 AM

As dpunisher pointed out in the previous post, clock speed is not an indicator of actual performance. Almost any modern processor will be more efficient and powerful than a Pentium 4. Intel processors are generally faster, for now, than AMD's but you will be paying a higher cost. Replacing the CPU, RAM, and motherboard will be necessary if you choose to go to another processor. Below are some possible upgrade suggestions.

AMD Phenom Quad Core

CPU: AMD Phenom 9850 BLACK EDITION 2.5GHz - This is the Black Edition which has unlocked multipliers making overclocking easier.
Motherboard: ASUS M3A78 AM2+/AM2 AMD 770 ATX AMD Motherboard - This is a good, inexpensive motherboard. It has only one PCIe x16 slot making SLI or Crossfire impossible.
RAM: G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066 (PC2 8500) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory - Get two of these for 8GB of RAM. Note, that if you have 4GB or more of RAM, you will need a 64-bit operating system to use it all. If you don't have, or don't want to purchase and install, a 64-bit operating system, purchase one RAM kit instead of two of these. If you purchase only one, you save $50. The total cost for all systems in this posting is for two RAM kits.
Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - This is used to bond the heatsink to the CPU. Many already have it applied, but I'm not sure if the heatsink coming with the Phenom has it.

Total Cost $343

AMD Dual Core

CPU: AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ 3.1GHz 1MB L2 Cache Socket AM2 89W Dual-Core Processor - This is essentially a four-core Phenom with two cores disabled. This processor costs half what the Phenom above does.
Other Components: Keep the rest of the items from the quad-core setup above, they are compatible with this processor.

Total Cost $280

Intel Quad Core


CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q9300 Yorkfield 2.5GHz 6MB L2 Cache LGA 775 95W Quad-Core Processor - A good processor using the latest 45nm technology.
RAM: Use the same RAM that the AMD Quad Core setup above uses.
Motherboard: ASUS P5QL PRO LGA 775 Intel P43 ATX Intel Motherboard - A solid, and inexpensive, motherboard. This only has one PCIexpress x16 slot making SLI or Crossfire impossible.

Total Cost $446

Intel Dual Core

CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Wolfdale 3.0GHz 6MB L2 Cache LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor - Solid dual core processor.
Other Components: Use the same RAM and motherboard from the Intel Quad Core setup above.

Total Cost $356

Edited by DJBPace07, 28 December 2008 - 05:32 PM.

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#7 monkeydog

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 05:19 PM

Thanks alot folks, I'm beginning to get a better understanding now. Realizing also that I will probably be much happier moving away from the pentiums. Now I'm going to spend some time looking at the combos you suggested and weighing my options, looking to do this around the end of January.

You note that the motherboards listed in your post come with only one pciE slot. I ask because I just purchased a video card last week which I installed on my current setup- a geforce 8400 pci. I realize regular pci cards probably will be gone soon, but it's what I needed. If I got a cpu and ram like one of the options you listed above, will I be able to find a good compatible motherboard with pci and pci express slots, or am I also going to have to get a new express video card?

Thanks again for y'alls help, it really is making this whole thing easier!

#8 DJBPace07

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 05:26 PM

All of the motherboards listed above have three standard PCI slots. They all also have a single PCIexpress x16 slot, for modern graphics cards. They also have PCIexpress x1 slots for smaller, less demanding cards. If you take a look at pictures of motherboard, you will see all the slots I mentioned. I chose not to list the full number of expansion slots each board has, which is six, since it is a given that almost all motherboards come with a combination of slots. Since they have only a single PCIexpress x16 slot, they cannot combine two or more graphics cards together in SLI or Crossfire.

Edited by DJBPace07, 28 December 2008 - 05:31 PM.

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#9 monkeydog

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 05:20 AM

Once again, thanks for your explanations and help. Now I shall begin seriously looking at different combinations and figuring out what to get!




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