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Using Paint


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Jove

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 08:39 PM

Hello Everyone !

When I am using my paint program, and I save the image, usually with a color background, immediately the image of the fonts seem to blur or bleed into the colored background,

I don't know the cause of this nor how to prevent it, does anyone know?

Edited by Jove, 21 December 2008 - 08:40 PM.

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#2 shame228

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 07:56 PM

Paint is a Bitmap '.bmp" program. Your text is blurry because of that. You need to do you text in a Vector program, such as Draw or what I use "illustrator". Vector runs off Mathematical paths and will not blur. Paint and photoshop are not made for text they are made for photo, design elements.. To make this short cause I could really elaborate on this topic. Lol... When you use text in a Bitmap program the text is mapped just like the photo, " you can see the map if you zoom in real close to an image" the Bitmap program will try to sharpen the text by using an effect called Anti-Alias... Anti-aliasing is a system whereby the edges of letters use shades between the color of the type and the color of the background. I will show you a example of how it is emulated.


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If you want Quality work you need to use multiple programs, or a suite like a Adobe suite or Corel Suite " I'm guessing that you are using Corel Paint? Corel has a Vector program called Corel Draw to do you text in. Then just import it, export it, Drag and drop it, into paint or draw vise a verse.. I use the Adobe CS4 Creative Suite for all my work, art, and projects, but I have used Corel when I worked at a prior Design Firm. Adobe is the best in my opinion. They are cutting edge in the industry of everything.. Google all the words that are underlined and there should be some sites that elaborate on this discussion. Hope this helps you out and if you have any more questions relating to Art, Design, IT, and or any advanced Computer problems feel free to ask!

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#3 Jove

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:01 AM

OK shame228,
Thanks a lot, It all looks very interesting, I was wondering what was happening, now I have an inkling.

I guess I'm a little behind times, but have been getting by creating Illustrations from a basic software, (line Drawings), but the thing is I need so much more, but that also includes language and is the reason for so much of my print going into it, it isn't English so I have to paste it.


I am using MS Paint V. 5.1 I'm not sure if that is Corel Paint, but I will check this out, thanks again!

Jove

Edited by Jove, 02 January 2009 - 08:08 AM.

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#4 Vaerli

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 06:46 PM

Isn't it more of the file type it was saved in? .jpgs and .bmps give lame text, by making artifacts? I try and always use the .png file format, because it is so much nicer in quality.

Once i took a 10x10 thing, made some black/grey dots and then saved it as a .jpg and a .png, and the png saved everything, but the jpg shifted everything so it was off. Its pretty interesting.

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#5 Platypus

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:09 PM

Yes, if the change occurs after the file is saved to disk, and the file is a lossy compressed format such as .JPG, the poor definition of text is at least partly due to the artifacts from compression. .BMP files should be OK, as they normally default to an uncompressed format, and also other uncompressed or lossless compression formats such as .TIF, .PNG and in limited circumstances, .GIF.

Jove, if you are working with an image, it should be saved in a lossless file format and if necessary converted to a lossy format like .JPG only as a final step when completed. It's still inevitable then that there will be some degradation of text quality, but it can be minimized by selecting the least amount of compression that will deliver an acceptable filesize.

The resolution of the image will also affect how "true" the representation of text can be, as it controls how many pixels form the characters. So if you are creating a bitmap image to print, make the image pixel dimensions as high a resolution as feasible. In contrast, if the image is for a screen viewing application, work at the required resolution from the start. If you need a 640x480 image for a webpage, don't start with a much larger canvas, then re-size it when completed, as the re-sampling will further degrade the edges of text. With a bitmap, there are only so many pixels to "draw" a given shape.

Simple work-arounds like these can help to get the best results from simple bitmap graphics programs like Paint. As shame228 comments, if you need to do more than Paint can manage, you'll need to move to more sophisticated software.

http://www.wfu.edu/~matthews/misc/graphics...ts/formats.html

Edited by Platypus, 02 January 2009 - 08:12 PM.

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