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New to programming


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#1 miansc

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 07:57 PM

Hello BleepingComputer members :flowers: I've just started getting into programming. I'm currently learning VB 2008. I'm using a great ebooks called Microsoft Visual Basic 2008 Step by Step. It is great because it includes practise files. Is VB a good first language to learn? After I get good at it, what should I move on to? Also, how do you write in C? I only see visual C++? Sorry for being a bit of an idiot, but I'm very new :thumbsup:

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#2 Dennis the Menace

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 12:00 AM

miansc
Since you started I would say to stay with VB until you get a grip. Just fyi here is a sample of a C program that is the first that many of us had to write ...

1 #include <stdio.h>
2 main()
3 {
4 printf("Hello World!!\n"); /* this is a comment */
5 }

1. tells the compiler to include the standard input ourput library header file
2. tells the compiler that this is the start of the program and the () states that nothing will be passed in
as arguments
3. start of code block
4. invoke function call to the print statement to print on standard output (i.e. the VTD -video display terminal)
the text in quotes is what will be printed ... and just because we want it to look neat we also send a new line
the \n character ... and of course the comment ... K&R standard C sets off comments between /* ... and ... */
The semicolon says that this is the end of the statement
5. The close brace tells the compiler that we are all done.

By the way, I believe that the bible for C is still the little white and blue book by Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie with collaboration of other friends at Bell Labs.

This is about as simple as it gets. C has many rules, variable types, structures, pointers etc but I think you will do
yourself proud by becoming efficient in VB to start with. Then the jump to C won't be too hard as you will have a
handle on the pinnings. There are probably many in these forums willing to assist but remember, you must do the work. Please learn to wright neat, tight code, don't be sloppy and for heaven's sake don't be verbose as if you were being paid by the character or per line of code. Coding can be somewhat similar to the old TV game show "I can name that tune in ?? so many ?? notes. Keep that philosophy when coding and you will be your own master. The first system I programmed had four registers and 16 kilobytes of memory.....either you wrote tight code or it would not fit and could not run. And what have we to play with today ... an 8-gigabyte thumb drive.

Have a great Holiday -- Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!! Remember there are only 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don't.

#3 miansc

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 02:24 AM

Wow, thanks for the detailed reply! But, like, do you write C as a text document or is there a program? Thats what I'm confused about because I see a program called visual c++ but that's made by microsoft. SO, if you get what I mean :thumbsup:

#4 miansc

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 06:57 AM

Also, how are Xbox 360 games made? C++??

#5 groovicus

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 09:26 AM

All practical languages are written as plain text.

Visual C++ is a development environment, or an IDE. There are free version that can do essentially the same thing, such as Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition. On that same page there is a link to the Game Creator's Development Kit, an online C++ Beginner's Guide, and a Video to get you started using the development environment.

XBox games are made in C, C++, and C#. There is also some information available from Microsoft that you might find interesting: XBox 360 Programming

#6 Steve_Irwin

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 10:35 AM

You can compile C using a C++ compiler that supports C.
C is the first language of the "C" programming language, it goes like this
C -> C++ -> C#
Most people use C++/C# nowadays because of the newer things. C is still used for all of your drivers because it's the fastest of the three. I'd recommend C++ first, then learn C or C#. Because of C++'s popularity, you can find many tutorials, and ebooks. A lot of games are made in C++ (And maybe Java too I'm not really sure lol. One famous game for a fact is Sims)


If you are a anti-Microsoft, you can learn Java, which is slow, but a good beginner language. Most programming classes starts with C++ or Java
I suggest trying Alice if you want to learn Java programming.
Hope that helps! good luck.

#7 groovicus

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 11:34 AM

If you are a anti-Microsoft, you can learn Java, which is slow,

Typical FUD. It is no slower than C++. :thumbsup: It has nothing to do with the language, and everything to do with how the code is written and compiled. Anyway, you are comparing apples to oranges. They were designed with different purposes in mind, so it is like saying a Corvette is faster than a 4-wheel drive. Sure, it may be fast on the highway, but throw it in a bog, and the Corvette will go nowhere. Java uses Just-In-Time compilers to compile the code on the fly, which means it can optimize on the fly. It works so well that C# does the same thing.

Anyway, not to turn this into a 'which language is better' thread, because frankly I won't waste my time. I don't care for incorrect information being spread on our forums though.

#8 miansc

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 02:52 AM

But, what I don't get it. Every language has their way of writing it. C++ you use Visual C++, VB U use ..... etc so, sorry for being a idiot, but where do you write the C code. Like is there a program or do you you Microsoft visual studio C++?

#9 groovicus

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 08:36 AM

You could use notepad if you wanted. A program is just a plain text file. If you want to create programs in C, then you could use Dev C++.

An IDE is simply a development environment that makes it a little easier to catch syntax errors and compile progams, but you don't need one at all. All you need is notepad.

#10 reece

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 08:53 AM

this helped me as well thanks

#11 groovicus

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 09:48 AM

I need to add a clarification to this. The initial progam is just a plain text file. Once it is compiled, a completely new file is created that then becomes the executable, dll, class file, etc.

#12 miansc

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 11:04 PM

Beautiful! Now I got yah :thumbsup:

I'd prefer a IDE, thats me though, hence being a beginner.

#13 miansc

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 07:53 AM

Wait so everything in a Xbox 360 game is made though c / c++? Even animation? you can draw in c++? :S

#14 groovicus

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 09:56 AM

Animations are simply pictures, and I am not sure that is what you mean. For instance, this is an animation: :thumbsup:

All bigger game production 'companies' develop tools and game engines that free them from having to recreate code every single time they make a game. The underlying code can be anything. The tools that are used to create 3d models can be written in any language.

Wait so everything in a Xbox 360 game is made though c / c++?

You forgot C# also.

#15 miansc

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Posted 31 December 2008 - 10:35 AM

groovicus, do you mind if I ask a few more questions about programming?

What's PS made in?
What can you do with python, perl, ruby?

Also for ruby python and perl, can you show some pics or something to what thy can make?


Oh, and what can you make with JAVA? You usa a javac compiler to write and compiler java right? If I remember correctly.

Edited by miansc, 31 December 2008 - 10:39 AM.





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