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RS232C (DB9) Cable


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5 replies to this topic

#1 urbanninja

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 11:15 AM

There is a 9-pin slot on my Rear-Projection T.V. and on the back of my computer. They are the only 2 compatible slots I see.
Is this cable able to show video and audio if I connect my T.V. and my computer with it?

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#2 SLIX

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 11:26 AM

No

An RS232 port is a serial port. They were used mainly on PCs to connect serial devices such as Joy Sticks, Dialup Modems etc before USB became the norm. Most modern PCs don't have an RS232 port anymore.
I'm not sure why your TV has an RS232 port on it, but I do know that you won't be able to connect it to your PC and expect to get Video and Audio on it. Its the wrong type of interface for that. What you would need on the TV would be a VGA interface

Edited by SLIX, 20 December 2008 - 11:29 AM.

Steve

#3 urbanninja

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 12:07 PM

Okay well, here is the back of my tv. it also has S-Video, but it only has 4/5 pin-holes while my computer has 7.
I have a cable that has 4/5 pins in it and i can make it fit in the one with seven, do you know if it will show video and audio or do i need an adapter?

Edited by urbanninja, 20 December 2008 - 12:36 PM.


#4 SLIX

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 02:22 PM

Hi

I think you will need an adapter like this one here. http://www.computercasesandcables.com/ccc/CV-25120.html
Please note that this adapter may not work with all video cards so there is no guarantee it will meet your needs.
You will also need an adapter for the audio like this one here. http://www.astarsolutions.co.uk/products/?pc=1054
Steve

#5 Platypus

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 04:50 PM

The RS232 port on the back of televisions/projectors is for service access, typically for applying any firmware update that may be issued for the unit.

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#6 Dennis the Menace

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 06:49 PM

It is quite posible that you have what you have guessed in the order of ports but someone in their infinite wisdon removed the pictures so I am able to just attempt to set you in the correct direction.

1. Normally the DB-9 ports on the computer were male (i.e. you could see the pins). Sometimes you can note these in the BIOS but the best test is to drop the data at 0040:0 to see if the computer has a serial port or RS-232 interface.
If you are familiar with the debug utility under dos here is what I would recommend:
a. click start and then run ... at the prompt type "cmd" without the quotes and hit the enter key.
b. at the command prompt type "debug" without the quotes and hit enter.
c. the debug prompt will be a dash; at the prompt type "d <space> 40:0" again without the quotes and hit enter.

The display will readout a bunch of hex digits at address 0040:0000 you might see F803, this is the address for com1, the first serial port, it is byte inverted so the real address is 03F8. The next pair is for com2, then com3 then com4. This
is followed by a dash and the port address of the first parallel port normally the same space as that used by the monochrome monitor in days of old BC 03 really 03bc ... these are followed by additional parallel ports if present.

TO EXIT FROM THE DEBUG PROMPT TYPE "Q" again without the quotes.

2. Next is the possibility that the port configuration is female insead of male. This could be for an old EGA or RGB connector in case you wanted to use the system in terminal mode or perhaps even an X-10 home automation video feed. Be extremely careful, whomever explained that Joy-sticks were hooked up to dee-bee-nine connectors is misinformed ... a joystick (and some still do exist on sound-blaster cards are 15-pin connectors ) perhaps he was thinking of mice --- there used to be lots of them.

a. if it is in-fact a joystick connector then it is a DB-15 connector (male on the joystick side and female on the computer side). The difference is the configuration **** this 15 pin connector has two rows eight (8) in one row and seven (7) in the other row.

I hope I have not overburdened you with info ... will re-read the entire posting again to see if I can aim you closer to a solution. JVC, SONY and CANON use 4-pin S-video connections ... the connector on the camera is usually female and the cable normally has both male end connectors. They are keyed to fit with two pins on each side of the key (i.e. two pins left of key and 2 pins right of key).

Good luch and have a great Christmas and holiday season.




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