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I'm trying Linus


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6 replies to this topic

#1 phawgg

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Posted 08 August 2004 - 06:59 PM

It hasn't been hours I've spent learning how to operate windows, not even days or weeks...more likely months if you add it all up. I still don't feel particularly safe on the internet. Despite everything I've learned about win xp pro, I feel those intent on ruining a good thing have, and always will, a sizeable head-start.

So, thinking even though it may not be the answer because of some of the apps I use, I'm jumping into learning Linux.

Devil-Linux, for starters. The download is 90MB's (3+ hours on my dial-up)

What is referred to as a "stable release", the 1.0.6-i486.tar.bz2. Hope I've picked the right one. :flowers: :trumpet: :thumbsup: :inlove: :cool: :)

(I tried to edit out Linus in favor of LINUX, but the topic line I guess can't be editted...maybe I should go to e-bay and buy a Charles Shultz book...and learn to quit carrying around a security blanket like win xp) lol

Edited by phawgg, 08 August 2004 - 07:11 PM.

patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

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#2 Grinler

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Posted 08 August 2004 - 11:13 PM

Many linux distributions are designed and worked on by groups of people at the same. One person may contribute to this part and another to another part. These distributions are then compiled at certain intervals and tested. Each time they are compiled and tested they are given a new release version.

At some point in a development cycle, when all goals for that particular cycle have been completed and the bugs have been worked out, they declare that particular release a stable release. it is a release that they feel is stable enough to be used for general consumption.

So to answer your questions :thumbsup: you picked the right one

#3 phawgg

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Posted 08 August 2004 - 11:49 PM

Excellant...the download just finished 5 minutes ago. I'm makin' good time with this new project already :thumbsup:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#4 T-man356

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 10:05 AM

If you need more in Linux, Ubuntu is probably THE BEST free distro available, and probably better than many of the paid versions. very easy to download and install. You can either install it over winXP or alongside it. This will let you choose which OS to use when you boot up.

#5 Guest_trizicus_*

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 11:11 PM

Umm... Let me give you some protips first...

You seem like a new computer user in general based on that post... If you think Linux is faster than Windows; that is generally true, but there are some differences...

Linux is harder to learn than windows, therefore you need a distro that is meant for newcomers; I recommend Ubuntu.

If you have never used the command line, don't start with Linux, start learning the command line in Windows so you at least have some idea of what you are getting yourself into.

#6 Trio3b

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 12:27 AM

Ouch!

Couldn't help overhearing (reading).

1. Windows required a learning curve. Linux requires a learning curve. Linux is not a BETTER Windows. It is Linux and has it's own feature set and foibles.

2. Linux is NOT Ubuntu. Ubuntu and its variants (known as *buntu) are merely versions based on Linux. There are other much more mature and newbie friendly and free distributions such as PCLinuxOS and Mandriva. Sorry, but having installed numerous versions of *buntu on close to 50 different desktops and laptops over the past 5 years, Ubuntu has been actually MORE inconsistent in it's installation, releases and general usability.

Case in point: Just loaded LinuxMint 9 Isadora( Ubuntu based) on a laptop. They failed to include the HPLIP printer package and the repositories don't even contain an older version. Not that they would work 9because they're outdated, but the fact that they were left out was a GIGANTIC boo boo. HPLIP provides drivers for hundreds of HP printers ..

Sorry Ubuntu users.

Also, Ubuntu has really pissed off some in the opensource community. Check out their homepage. Last time I checked there is no mention of Linux. Just like MS, Apple, Google and Android who use technology created by others and then conveniently fail to give credit where credit is due, so goes Ubuntu. That is not what community means.

3. Before you take the plunge, decide if you are running from Windows or towards Linux.

4. Test out Linux with LiveCD's. most distros have them.

5. Go to your local thrift shop and pickup a cheap PC. Most Linux will run on a P3 with 512mb RAM (yes Linux will run on 128 or even less but desktop environments will NOT be what the new user expects. Xfce, lxde, icewm and others are just too different for most newbs. KDE and GNOME really need 512mb)

6. Command line is available but almost never required any more. Modern Linux is mostly point n click. Command line is nothing to be scared of.

7. If you do heavy gaming, professional video or sound editing, or absolutely positively need to use AutoCad, Photoshop or QuickBooks then stick with a dual boot of Windows and Linux. (Sorry but Wine is iffy and not easy for newbs) There are alternatives for these programs listed, but if you are in an enterprise production environment, your employer will likely require you to use those commercial offerings.

Hope this helps

#7 Capn Easy

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 04:14 AM

Just a note that this is a really old thread, and the OP hasn't been around for a while.




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