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Possible broken fan or drive motor


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#1 EdBee

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 05:37 PM

On an older machine (PIONEX{IBM Clone}) Pentium 2- I am having a problem.

When it boots up it turns itself off at varying stages of the process with no message. Sometimes it goes all of the way to showing the desktop (and I can access a folder before failure) and other times it doesnt make it to windows. The machine is making noises that I have never heard before as well.

I am assuming either a fan not working and than over heating or a bad drive motor
for the hard disk. I have had no experience with either situation with PCs.

I will be opening it up in the future to try to see what is up inside. Before I do that I could use some advise as how to perhaps isolate first. I was told to boot up with a floppy and see what is different. If it is a fan not working I am reluctant to keep booting up over and over again until a get overheating which will finish it off forever. Any advise on this will be appreciated :thumbsup: :flowers:

Edited by EdBee, 11 May 2005 - 05:38 PM.

EDBEE from NMUSA- RENOWNED MALWARE FIGHTER AND SWORN ENEMY OF ALL INTERNET HIJACKERS

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#2 Leurgy

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 06:03 PM

Hi EdBee

If you took the case off the noise should be fairly easy to isolate. Take a listen to Noises that indicate a defective drive. That might give you a hint as to whether its the hard drive.

Booting with a floppy will bypass using the hard drives unless you try to get to a C: prompt so that would be a sign a drive is failing too. The only other fans would be the CPU, Video card and power supply.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

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#3 EdBee

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 02:59 PM

Thanks much,
I will open up and try to find what the noise is coming from--are these fans easy enough to tell if they are working just by listening? Do PCs have temp sensors that cause the shutdown if the fan not working--Thanks again
EDBEE from NMUSA- RENOWNED MALWARE FIGHTER AND SWORN ENEMY OF ALL INTERNET HIJACKERS

#4 Leurgy

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 04:11 PM

are these fans easy enough to tell if they are working just by listening? 


I've always found that to be the case. You can also notice if they are spinning fast enough, or if they slow down in conjunction with the noise. When inside the computer do not touch anything unless you touch the bare metal frame of the case. Static electricity in your body can ruin a computer chip without you noticing anything happening.

Do PCs have temp sensors that cause the shutdown if the fan not working


This typically depends on the age of the computer. Normally the older machines won't have that feature. The higher end older ones and most of the newer ones do. The motherboard must have the neccessary sensors and they must be enabled.

When you turn on your computer you can press the Delete key to enter the Bios. On the page that opens look for something that says Hardware Monitor or the like and use the arrow keys to highlight that and press enter. That will give you an idea of what options (if any) are available on your computer. To exit the bios use the Esc key and the boot will continue.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

**** We use our powers for good, not evil ****

 Trying to remove your data from the web is like trying to remove pee from a swimming pool


#5 EdBee

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Posted 13 May 2005 - 02:14 PM

Luergy,

That's some real great info. I will not be messing with it until the next rainy day--too nice now outside. I once had a Packard Bell 386--i went inside and trashed the chip and whatever else promptly--Thanks again-- :thumbsup:
EDBEE from NMUSA- RENOWNED MALWARE FIGHTER AND SWORN ENEMY OF ALL INTERNET HIJACKERS

#6 Leurgy

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Posted 13 May 2005 - 02:30 PM

Your welcome. Please post back and let us know how you make out.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. Abraham Maslo

**** We use our powers for good, not evil ****

 Trying to remove your data from the web is like trying to remove pee from a swimming pool





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