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Correct Firewall setting for wireless networking


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#1 Shoban Sen

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 08:04 PM

I have a home wireless network set up between my desktop and laptop computers. It was set up 2-3 years ago and I seldom use it. Today I tried to use it and it was not working. I could not see/reach a folder that I have on my laptop from my desktop. But I know and can see it is a shared folder. I also could not print anything from my laptop using the remote printer physically connected to my desktop with a cable.

After trying many things and going through Windows help documents, I suddenly remembered when the network was set up, the Tech Help person asked me to turn off my firewall in both machines. I tried that, and everything worked fine. I could open my folder in the laptop from my desktop and could print from my laptop using the printer connected to the desktop.

But the problem is as soon as I turn off my firewall, Norton Internet Security warns me that my computer is in DANGER and I know that. Just to find out if my previously established home wireless network works, I turned the firewall off in both computers for a few minutes, then put them back on for safety. My question is: How can I configure my firewalls so that wireless networking is possible between my two computers WITHOUT too much of undue RISK. Can somebody walk me through the steps?

Both my computers run Windows XP with Service Pack2 and Norton Internet Secuity 2007. In both my computers, Windows firewall has been disabled so that it does not clash with Norton Internet Security.

Any help from any knowledgeable person will be highly appreciated. I want to be able to use the wireless home network WITHOUT TOO MUCH OF RISK.
~Shoban Sen~
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#2 Lloyd T

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 07:57 PM

Do steps 1 to 12 on the desktop first:

1. Open Norton Internet Security.
2. Click on the Norton Internet Security tab.
3. Click on Settings.
4. Scroll down to Internet Security and Firewall Options and click on it.
5. Click on Trust Control.
6. Click on the Trusted tab.
7. Click on the Add... button.
8. Enter the LAN IP of the laptop (e.g. 192.168.0.3*)**
9. Click on OK.
11. Click on the OK button in the main window.
12. Click on the X to exit.
13. Do steps 1 to 12 on the laptop but type the desktop's LAN IP instead on the Trusted tab.

* This is not the actual IP, yours might vary.
** Make sure that the other computer's LAN IP is static (doesn't change) so that you don't have to change the settings every time the IP changes.

Feel free to ask any questions.

Edited by Lloyd T, 06 December 2008 - 07:59 PM.


#3 Mr-Bee19

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 10:57 PM

Yep you have to configure your firewall. A good test to see right off the bat whether its your firewall is by trying to ping the other computer. If you cannot ping it, more than likely it is your firewall.

And if you are really concerned about security and risks, then I HIGHLY recommend you upgrade to Service Pack 3. Sounds like you haven't kept up too date with your Windows Updates. I would do that first right after you fix your firewall problem. And as for the Windows Firewall, you should keep it on. Windows Firewall does not clash with any other Firewalls (ie. Norton, McAfee, Kaspersky). When was the last time you even saw Windows Firewall come up and detect anything? I would keep it on. Two firewalls is better than one. It isn't like you have Norton and McAfee running at the same time.

#4 Shoban Sen

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 01:45 PM

To: Lloyd T

Hi:

Thanks. This is what I was looking for. Only you have to tell me how to find out the LAN IP (Static) of each computer.

I actually have SP3, I forgot. I wrote SP2 because when I purchased the computers they came with SP2. But my computers are set for Windows automatic updates. So SP3 has been downloaded and installed in each machine.

I thought when I installed NIS, it instructed me to turn off Windows firewall; that is why I have turned it off. I must have read somewhere about that. I didn't do it myself. But if you say, there won't be any clash I can turn Windows firewall back on. But then would it interfere with my home wireless network like NIS is doing? Please clarify this point. Sounds like in that case I have to tell Windows somehow (I am sure you can guide me on that too) to allow wireless networking between my laptop and desktop?

A side question: I had posted this question in another forum because I was not getting a quick answer in Bleeping Computer forum. Two people in that forum replied immediately and almost identically. Basically they said, "If you have a router on your internet connection and if your wireless network is WEP/WPA (password protected) you really are not in any danger at all." Yes, I have a router (Netgear) and my wireless network is password protected (not sure if it is called WEP/WPA). I know the hardware also provides firewall protection, but as you said, two firewalls are better than one. That is why we use software protection too. Now if I turn on Windows firewall, that will be three firewalls. Right?
~Shoban Sen~
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#5 Shoban Sen

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 01:52 PM

To: Mr-Bee 19

Hi:

Thanks for your reply. I am not sure what is PING and how to do it.

Regarding the second part of your reply, I confused it with Lloyd T's reply and answered it in my reply to Lloyd T. above. Please see my reply to Lloyd T. Thanks.
~Shoban Sen~
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#6 Shoban Sen

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 01:58 PM

To: Lloyd T.

The second part of my reply to you (regarding Service Pack 3) was meant for Mr-Bee 19. Sorry.
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

#7 Lloyd T

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 02:04 PM

Hello again.

Only you have to tell me how to find out the LAN IP (Static) of each computer.


What is the model of your router?

I thought when I installed NIS, it instructed me to turn off Windows firewall; that is why I have turned it off. I must have read somewhere about that. I didn't do it myself. But if you say, there won't be any clash I can turn Windows firewall back on. But then would it interfere with my home wireless network like NIS is doing? Please clarify this point.


When I installed NIS on my other computer, it disabled Windows Firewall.

It's up to you if you want both firewalls running but you'll have to configure both firewalls separately to make your network work. Plus, you'll have to configure both firewalls if a program can't connect to the Internet.

Basically they said, "If you have a router on your internet connection and if your wireless network is WEP/WPA (password protected) you really are not in any danger at all." Yes, I have a router (Netgear) and my wireless network is password protected (not sure if it is called WEP/WPA). I know the hardware also provides firewall protection, but as you said, two firewalls are better than one. That is why we use software protection too. Now if I turn on Windows firewall, that will be three firewalls. Right?


Well, the hardware firewall will only protect you if it's turned on. You'll also have to configure it if one of your programs wants to connect to the Internet. It won't interfere with your network, though.

If your wireless network is password protected, it will only protect you from other people near you from connecting and getting free Internet. But it won't protect you from remote attacks.

#8 Shoban Sen

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 06:33 PM

To: Lloyd T.

Hello and thanks again. I'll do whatever you say. I'm not good at PING PONG (Just kidding). I really have minimal knowledge about Networking. So please treat me as real novice.

My router is Netgear 54 Mbps Wireless Router WGR614 v6. Does it make any sense? I have broadband cable connection. Please let me know if you need any other details to walk me through the process. Thanks.
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

#9 Lloyd T

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:32 PM

Please answer these questions:

1. Do you know the username and password needed to access the router with administrator rights (say yes or no, don't post them here or anywhere else)?

2. How many computers are there in your network?

#10 Mr-Bee19

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:33 PM

To find our your computers IP address, click on <START> then <RUN>. type in "cmd".

In the black box that opens up, type in "ipconfig" without the brackets.

You will see your IP Address, Subnet Mask, and Default Gateway. The IP address is the numbers you want to configure within your NIS

#11 Lloyd T

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 07:00 PM

You actually type in "ipconfig /all" (without quotes) in the Command Prompt.

Do this on all computers in the network:

1. Go to Start>All Programs>Accessories>Command Prompt. A black box will appear.
2. Type in "ipconfig /all" (without quotes, note the space between g and /). A bunch of info will appear.
3. Look for "IP Address" and write down the IP address.
4. Write down the IP address of all computers in the networkand post them back here like this:

Computer 1: 192.168.0.2
Computer 2: 192.168.0.3
Computer 3: 192.168.0.4

Edited by Lloyd T, 08 December 2008 - 07:36 PM.


#12 Shoban Sen

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:43 PM

To: Lloyd T

Hi:

Sorry for the delay in replying. I actually have to work for a living.

1. Yes, I know the user ID and password to access my router.

2. There are only two computers in my network (a desktop and a laptop).

As regards your latest reply asking me to post the IP addresses of all my computers in the forum, I am not sure why you asked me to do that. When I get the IP addresses of both my computers, can I not just configure the firewall settings in NIS using the method you described in details in your original (first) reply??
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

#13 Lloyd T

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:49 PM

Yes, you can just configure the firewall yourself. No need to post them here. Sorry about that.

You can configure NIS now that you have both computers' LAN IP.

Do you still want to check if the computers' LAN IP is dynamic or static? If the computers' IP address were dynamic, you'll have to do the steps (including the part where you check the IP address) everytime File and Printer Sharing doesn't work.

#14 Michael York

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 06:48 PM

Hi Shoban Sen,

This is Mike from the Norton Authorized Support Team.

I just wanted to clarify something for you regarding the use of Norton Internet Security and the Windows firewall. If you are using Norton Internet Security which contains the Norton Personal Firewall, than the Windows firewall must be disabled, or you will run in to conflicts. The rule of thumb is that you never want to have more than one firewall running at the same time.

Also, if your subscription to Norton Internet Security 2007 is still active, then you are eligible to a free update to Norton internet Security 20009, which is highly recommended. To update, make note of your current Activation Key and then, using Internet Explorer 5.5 or higher, visit the Norton Update Center.

Norton Update Center

Make sure that you have all of the Windows patches and service packs applied and then open Norton Internet Security 2009 and re-configure the "trusted" devices to allow for sharing.

I would also suggest that the first time that you launch the 2009 version that you manually run LiveUpdate and then complete a "Full System Scan" to make sure that there are no infections on your machine.


Thank you,
Mike
Michael York
Norton Authorized Support Team
Symantec Corporation
http://service.symantec.com/priority

#15 Shoban Sen

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 08:21 PM

To: Michael York AND Lloyd T:

So how do I find out the static IP address? It sounds like ipconfig or ipconfig /all is going to reveal to me my computer's dynamic IP address (I, of course, do NOT keep my computers on all the time - I disconnect from the Internet and re-connect again next time when I want go to the Internet). And configuring the firewall setting in NIS with the new IP address everytime is a big pain in the --- you know where.

I would expect Mr Michael York to guide me on this from beginning to end (please read my original posting #1 on this topic) since you are a member of Norton Authorized support team. Whatever you have said so far is NOT related to my problem/question. It is only a sales speech. By the way, I have signed up for automatic renwal with Symantec and my NIS has just been renewed automatically till Dec. 18, 2009. I am not going to upgrade again. I am using Norton Antivirus since 1998 and upgraded many times over the years. In fact, I am thinking of canceling Norton next year and switching to a competitive brand. Free Tech Help is very difficult/almost impossible to get from Norton for home users. If you try to refute, you have to FIRST tell me right here in this forum how to configure my firewall in NIS permanently so that I can use my wireless home network between my desktop and laptop without any trouble and I can use the printer connected to my desktop to print from my laptop wirelessly. AGAIN, BEFORE REPLYING PLEASE READ MY PROBLEM IN MY ORIGINAL POSTING FIRST AND GET MORE INFO FROM MY SUBSEQUENT REPLIES TO OTHER FORUM MEMBERS. I HAVE NO TIME TO REPEAT THE SAME THING AGAIN AND AGAIN. And let me tell you, Mr. York, I don't expect this forum to be a place for sales promotion. This forum is for helping each other on technical issues. Let me see if you can walk me through the entire process. If I am satisfied, I may reconsider and upgrade to NIS 2009. ;-)
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...




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