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Problem with Intel Desktop Board


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#1 FlashofBlue

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 01:38 PM

Hi everybody!

I have been having a problem getting a computer to boot. It has a D865PERL Intel Desktop Board with an Intel Pentium 4. :thumbsup:

I disconnecting everything from the Power Supply, including the "12 V processor core voltage connector" and it turns on, but as soon as I connect the "12 V processor core voltage connector" it shuts down (Fans turn off).

Any ideas or can anyone point me in the right direction?


Sound like a CPU problem?


Thank you in advance for any help.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 02:11 PM

Not sure I follow your logic...but I would guess that the CPU is one of the least frequent hardware items to go, while the PSU is probably one of the more frequent.

Just guessing (again) :thumbsup:.

Louis

#3 FlashofBlue

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 02:27 PM

Hi Louis,
thanks for taking the time to respond. Sorry if I wasn't clear. I'll try again.

I was having a problem getting my computer to boot. So I did replace the Power supply, and then I started to plug things in, one at a time, to make sure nothing else was causing a problem.

First, I plugged in the main Motherboard power cable. Got a green light on the Motherboard and the fans activated.

Next i plugged in the "12 V processor core voltage connector" to the mother board. When I turned the power on, the fans came on for about 3 seconds, then it shut down. This is the same problem that I had prior to replacing the Power Supply. So, I am back to square one.


Does this problem sound familiar to anyone?

Anybody have any suggestions?


Thanks for any help.



Not sure I follow your logic...but I would guess that the CPU is one of the least frequent hardware items to go, while the PSU is probably one of the more frequent.

Just guessing (again) :thumbsup:.

Louis


Edited by FlashofBlue, 05 December 2008 - 02:28 PM.


#4 hamluis

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 03:06 PM

Hmm...thanks for the clarification :thumbsup:.

I think I experienced the same/a similar thing when I bent my CPU pins while shifting back and forth between motherboards (I was trying to see if they would work). But...I can't be sure, since it has only occurred once and I certainly wasn't calm enough to detect the bent pins or even consider the CPU area.

I suggest you wait for more opinions from better qualified persons of more experience.

Louis

#5 FlashofBlue

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 03:08 PM

Louis - thanks for taking a look anyway :thumbsup:



Hmm...thanks for the clarification :flowers:.

I think I experienced the same/a similar thing when I bent my CPU pins while shifting back and forth between motherboards (I was trying to see if they would work). But...I can't be sure, since it has only occurred once and I certainly wasn't calm enough to detect the bent pins or even consider the CPU area.

I suggest you wait for more opinions from better qualified persons of more experience.

Louis



#6 Platypus

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 06:48 PM

Intel offer a boot issue faultfinding checklist:

http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/...b/CS-010254.htm

At first I was concerned you may have been plugging in the CPU 12V connector while the PSU was powered up, but then you clarified: "When I turned the power on" so I guess not.

If you're sure the second PSU is working normally, I'd suggest first trying the CMOS memory clearing procedure just to be sure, as per the section "Settings were changed in BIOS", basically remove the CMOS backup battery for an hour, then replace it & try again. If this causes the system to boot up normally, the original PSU may then work fine.

If this makes no difference, then it looks like excessive power draw on the 12V CPU rail is shutting the PSU down. I agree with hamluis, CPU failure is possible, but rare. More likely is a failure in the switching regulators that convert the 12V to the CPU core voltage. These incorporate Mosfet transistors and flatpack diodes (rectifiers) which can fail. In the image link below, they are the devices with two silver legs and a silver tab on the opposite side soldered flat onto the board between the CPU and the I/O connector blocks.

http://img283.imageshack.us/img283/3185/in...straightps5.jpg

If any of these look or smell burned, melted or discolored, then the board is faulty. They can also fail and appear quite normal, so in that case only a technician would be able to correctly diagnose the fault.

Rapid shutdown can also be caused by overheating, if the CPU cooler has become dislodged from making correct contact with the CPU. But 3 seconds would be a very short thermal response, and I doubt if a P4 would provoke shutdown this soon, as they incorporate thermal throttling, and keep running but slow way down to reduce heat output. But it's still something to check.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#7 FlashofBlue

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 07:15 PM

Platypus,
thank you very much for taking the time to help.

You have given me a lot to look at. I will go back at it tomorrow, then post what I find.

Thanks again.

#8 dpunisher

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 08:30 PM

Also check you CPU cooler retention. I had one act up in a similar fashion and the problem was a loose heatsink due to a cracked bracket.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#9 FlashofBlue

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 10:27 PM

Thanks punisher,

will do. :thumbsup:

#10 FlashofBlue

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 03:56 PM

Today, I disconnected everything and took the Motherboard out of the case.

I checked the Motherboard for any obvious damage and found none.

Then I took off the CPU heatsink and made sure that the CPU was seated completely. I cleaned up the heatsink and the top of the CPU, added some thermal grease and reinstalled the heatsink.

Cleaned everything up again, left one RAM DIMM in, installed the video card and hooked up the monitor. I connected the main motherboard power and turned it on... green light on the board and the fans started.

Turned off power and then connected the 12 volt main CPU power. (This is where I had trouble before.) Turned on the power and everything ran correctly.

I disconnected the video card and monitor and reinstalled the Motherboard into the case, added power.. again everything good.

I then started to add sound, NIC, and made my connections, but checked by adding power after each change. Everything worked perfectly.

The computer is all buttoned up and working great.

Thanks everyone for your help! :thumbsup:

#11 Platypus

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 04:11 PM

Glad to hear you got a good result. Here's hoping it stays good.

Did you use a good quality thermal paste, not just a generic "white goo"?

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#12 hamluis

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 07:19 PM

Nice job, happy computing :thumbsup:.

Louis




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