Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Question : Hard Drive


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Delta16

Delta16

  • Members
  • 417 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 02 December 2008 - 04:03 PM

I know that the hard drive is suppose to be placed the sticker with white background with black words upwards, like picture a below.

Picture A ( Not mine :thumbsup: )
Posted Image


Can i flip the hard disk position, so now the sticker with white background and black words on it will be facing down. Does this position makes the hard drive to damage it self?

Thanks

Edited by Deadly Elegance, 02 December 2008 - 04:05 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:00 PM

Posted 02 December 2008 - 04:53 PM

You can flip the disk over, in many PC's the disks are upside down. In my case, the hard drives are on their sides.

3939.png

 


#3 Delta16

Delta16
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 417 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 03 December 2008 - 07:19 AM

Thanks for the reply. I asked you this question cause im going to buy a hard drive cooler and noticed that the heat is spreading from the other side of the sticker. At least it doesnt damage it self.

Thanks for the reply

Edited by Deadly Elegance, 03 December 2008 - 07:21 AM.


#4 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,085 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 03 December 2008 - 02:43 PM

Well...the heat comes from the underside because that's the quickest way out to open air. Even though it comes from beneath, it will rise to the warmer parts of the system interior (I don't remember much, but I remember that heat rises through lower temps.

So I don't think how it's placed really matters, as long as there is an escape route for the heat (which is why air flow is a consideration in where things are placed in a system).

I would not place a hard drive on a flat surface with the open side down for long periods of use.

Louis

#5 Delta16

Delta16
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 417 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 04 December 2008 - 09:44 AM

I am going to flip it upside down, so the open face will have a hard drive extractor ( it will extract heat from the open face) and i would like to see the cooler for better appearance.

And heat goes up while cold goes down :D thats why the power supply fan and the rear fan are at the top of the case. :thumbsup:

Thanks for helping

#6 skiplc

skiplc

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:00 PM

Posted 04 December 2008 - 12:56 PM

Check with the hdd manufacturer for orientation limitations...for example Western Digital says;

"WD drives will function normally whether they are mounted sideways or upside down..."

#7 Delta16

Delta16
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 417 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 04 December 2008 - 02:46 PM

Check with the hdd manufacturer for orientation limitations...for example Western Digital says;

"WD drives will function normally whether they are mounted sideways or upside down..."


Do you know the maxtor orientations cause i cant find any on their site.

Thanks

Edited by Deadly Elegance, 04 December 2008 - 02:52 PM.


#8 skiplc

skiplc

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:00 PM

Posted 04 December 2008 - 06:50 PM

I can only find the remark to "install horizontally or verticlly" (words to that effect); a couple of users report the hdd runs cooler upside down or that they ran quieter. I'd take those remarks with a grain of salt.

I think you'll be OK. I often turn drives upside down when bench testing or burning in systems and haven't noticed any problems.

#9 Delta16

Delta16
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 417 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 05 December 2008 - 12:27 PM

Got an answer for my question.
The disk goes round in vacuum, so if you flip it, the disk wont cause any damage cause its locked when it is turning.

Thanks all for helping me.

#10 skiplc

skiplc

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:00 PM

Posted 05 December 2008 - 04:29 PM

Unless something has changed, this is the information I have.

"A mistaken belief of most users is that a hard drive has a vacuum. Actually, the system of the hard drive relies on air pressure inside the structure to support the heads during “flight” or reading-writing tasks. Users also assume that hard drives are totally sealed, but hard drives to work correctly needs a range of air pressure. If too low, it will not exert force on the heads or keep them at the proper height.

Hard drives have permeable filters located between the inside of the drive and the top cover. This allows moisture in the air outside to enter the drive. These filters can be seen as breather holes and usually has stickers to warn the user not to cover them."

http://www.hotfact.com/mechanics-of-a-hard-drive.html

http://www.storagereview.com/guide2000/ref...op/packAir.html

#11 Delta16

Delta16
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 417 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malta
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 06 December 2008 - 02:43 AM

Thanks for the great info.
I learned from it. Thanks again




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users