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Can viruses really steal ID information?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 jill8beans2

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 12:39 AM

I, like many other people, use my computer for everything including paying bills, gaming and plain old surfing. A friend told me about some viruses and trojans that you get, can actually find confidential personal ID information on you computer like SSN or credit card info, and send it to scammer who then can rip you off. Is this true?

What can be done about it?

I have and anti-virus program called Cyberdefender on my computer, is that enough protection?
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#2 CCRN396

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 08:51 AM

Hi,
I believe Cyberdefender falls under an antispyware program. You need 1 antivirus program , a firewall and at least 1 antispyware program (I like Superantispyware and Malwarebytes Anti-malware). All of these programs are free, but you will need to manually update them. I would run a scan on your computer at least weekly (I perform spyware scans daily, but that's me). Spyware Blaster is another program you should have.

You could try http://www.majorgeeks.com/page.php?id=20 which has a list of antivirus, firewall, and antispyware program downloads, most of which are free. Here are a couple of tutorials from BC that are helpful:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/understanding-spyware-browser-hijackers-and-dialers/

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/

Edited by CCRN396, 30 November 2008 - 08:53 AM.


#3 ruby1

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 10:20 AM

A friend told me about some viruses and trojans that you get, can actually find confidential personal ID information on you computer like SSN or credit card info, and send it to scammer who then can rip you off. Is this true?


Yes it is true and you can see instances of this when you browse any HJT forum and see what has happened to victims :thumbsup:

what part OF

http://www.cyberdefender.com/

do YOU have installed as it does come with an Antivirus part??

If cyberdefender is your only protection I would recommend you add at least the Malwarebytes and superantispyware programs which you will find in the links provided

If you are in doubt about the health of your computer you could run scans with both of those tools and let them be checked for you ?

#4 quietman7

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 02:38 PM

Tips to protect yourself against malware:
• "Simple and easy ways to keep your computer safe".
• "How did I get infected?, With steps so it does not happen again!".
• "Hardening Windows Security - Part 1 & Part 2".
• "IE Recommended Minimal Security Settings" - "How to Secure Your Web Browser".
• "Use Task Manager to close pop-up messages to safely exit malware attacks"

• Avoid gaming sites, underground web pages, pirated software, crack sites, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs. They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Many malicious worms and Trojans spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications. Read P2P Software User Advisories and Risks of File-Sharing Technology.
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#5 jill8beans2

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 11:43 PM

what part OF

http://www.cyberdefender.com/

do YOU have installed as it does come with an Antivirus part??

If cyberdefender is your only protection I would recommend you add at least the Malwarebytes and superantispyware programs which you will find in the links provided

If you are in doubt about the health of your computer you could run scans with both of those tools and let them be checked for you ?


That's a good question. It says I have anti-virus AND anti-spyware. I will have to check further to make sure we have enough protection.
I am going to run scans and check it out. You can never be too careful.
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#6 Michael-Anthony

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 08:24 AM

If you type any of your financial information, a keylogger could grab it and send it to whoever.

If you have your financial information saved by a program, any other program could look for and find the file that your info is saved in, and send it to whoever.(although unlikely, the virus would have to be programmed to search for a specific programs filestore)

#7 quietman7

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 09:30 AM

AutoComplete is a feature that allows your machine to remember and store your passwords and other information. Autocomplete will store words that you have previously put into search boxes and forms at Web sites such as search strings, names, email addresses, passwords and credit card numbers. As you type, AutoComplete tries to anticipate what you are typing so it can automatically fill in the necessary information when returning to websites you previously visited. This is intended to save time by not having to re-type the same information. The autocomplete feature can also save the list of programs you started from the Run dialog box and the search queries you performed offline while searching for documents on your computer.

Using the AutoComplete feature is a significant security risk. If someone else uses your machine with the same account, they may be able to get access to your username and password information. That would allow them to visit those websites which require a password for security purposes. If your machine becomes infected with a backdoor Trojan, a remote attacker could gain unauthorized access to the computer and steal sensitive information like passwords, personal and financial data. By the time you find out your passwords have been compromised, its probably too late. For maximum security and privacy its best to Disable AutoComplete. (instructions with screenshots)

Edited by quietman7, 02 December 2008 - 09:31 AM.

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#8 apocalypticgirl

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 01:55 PM

I got the free Cyberdefender anti-virus program first off their website (www.cyberdefender.com) which found a lot of stuff on my system and got rid of the spyware and Trojans. I guess I should have gotten the paid version, but since the free scanner didn’t find any viruses I didn’t buy the upgrade then. In the past, some of the software that I installed on my system I couldn’t get completely un-installed. As a test I un-installed Cyberdefender, and found that it was completely removed, no lingering pops or other stuff.

I re-installed Cyberdefender and ran it once a month or any time I got strange pop ups, just check so viruses, spyware or other bad stuff. About 2 weeks ago, a virus came along and Cyberdefender caught it, and so I bought the upgrade to get rid of the virus. I later ran Cyberdefender after the upgrade and it could not detect the virus. Since then, no problems. This is my experience with Cyberdefender - really good software and the 24/7 computer help is great. I also found Cybderdefenders how to remove spyware video on YouTube, which shows their really good interface:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qN_bwH1KIQE...feature=related


I do think disabling autocomplete is a good idea if you share a computer at all, or if you might be worried about anyone having a keylogger on the computer. Could save you some headaches there.




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