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How many wireless devices on a wireless router?


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#1 chimo79

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Posted 26 November 2008 - 07:29 PM

I have a wireless router in which I use some wired connections but I have reached the point where I am about to exceed the four available ports. The router is a Linksys WRT150N wireless N, four port router. I have connected to the wired ports, my desktop PC and a pair of drives in a NAS enclosure. I have connect wireless my wife's laptop and her Wii Fit game console. The cable modem has its own port beyond the four.

I want to add (shortly) a wireless network printer and a Windows Media Center Extender and a wireless video camera (security camera). How many devices can I route wireless over this 4 port router. Clearly, I am limited to 4 wired devices but I could expand this with a wired switch. But, can I have all four wired ports occupied and still connect several wireless devices. Is there a limit to the number of wireless devices (beyond the bandwidth problem) or is the 4 port router limited to 4 devices in total regardless of how they are connected.

Regardless of the answer to the above, how do I expand my wireless network to more (wireless) capacity. With a media Center Extender transmitting HD video, there is not a lot of surplus bandwidth. Can I add (for example) an additional wireless switch/hub/router or whatever in a daisy-chained configuration similar to what I would do in a wired network?

I am rapidly getting beyond my rather basic understanding of wireless networking.

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#2 sreez

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Posted 27 November 2008 - 08:47 AM

Hi Chimo79,

You should enable wireless on your linksys first. Then you can add upto 254 devices to it . As four already connected to it already you can use the rest 250 wireless. But the bandwidth is issue. Anyways I dont think that you add those many devices.

Once you enable wireless on you router you can attach all the devices wireless. To do this get the router home via browser
192.168.1.1(default). usename: (blank) password:admin

Enable the setting there for wireless.

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#3 chimo79

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Posted 27 November 2008 - 03:03 PM

Thanks so much sreez. I was uncertain if the router had a limitation on the number of wireless devices that meant four devices total (wired and wireless). If I understand you, I can connect four wired devices and any one of those could be a daisy-chain to additional ports through a hub. In addition, I can also have up to 256 wireless devices on the router.

Actually, I think that may be much more limited since the IP address range of the DHCP server in the router is confined to a range of 50 IPs if I remember correctly. In either case, that is more than enough for my purposes. I will just keep adding until I start to see bandwidth problems. My greatest worry is the Media Center Extender which may eat bandwidth with HD video.

#4 Paul Beesley

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Posted 29 November 2008 - 06:16 PM

So long as the signal is strong, you should be able to stream HD video alright over 11n. Since the bandwidth is shared between devices, a large load might cause problems but the MCE should use 5mbps max when streaming HD.




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