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Same Chipset - Different Motherboard


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Poll: Formatting HDD & Reinstalling Windows (2 member(s) have cast votes)

Based on the specified change, is it necessary to format and reinstall?

  1. Absolutely Necessary - Won't work without it (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  2. Extremely Recommended - Could potentially create problems (1 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

  3. No Need - Just reinstall the NVIDIA drivers (1 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

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#1 Typhoon859

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 09:41 PM

I currently have the EVGA 680i motherboard which contains the NVIDIA chipset. I want to upgrade my motherboard to most likely the 780i. I know that it's ALWAYS recommended to format and reinstall Windows (more specifically Vista in my case) unless it's just a replacement, but I don't see a need for it. If there is an actual reason, what are some examples/specific problems that can occur if I don't do this? Please answer by what you know, not by what you've heard.

-Thanks in advance.

Edited by Typhoon859, 22 November 2008 - 09:44 PM.

-The guy with all the rarest problems of the world-

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#2 rigacci

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 10:47 PM

I did this with a Dell machine. The chipset was the only common factor. The OS went through nsome reconfiguring and took an extra reboot but it came through.

I would first make a full backup of your existing system. (an 'image' would be good) That way, if anything went wrong, you have something to go back to.

You can also do the motherboard swap and then when you boot up with the OS disk you do a 'Repair' install.

Good luck.

DR

#3 Typhoon859

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 11:03 PM

I hate when somebody gives me a good answer and then I have to bug them for more but... I sorta understand what you're telling me to do but this is a very delicate process so can you try and extend the explanation of what to do a little bit? Also, I have an extra blank hard drive and I was wondering if you knew of any backing up program that pretty much can do what RAID 1 does, except, instead of mirroring every change right away, it just applies the changes during a specifc time that I could choose (like at shutdown).


Mod Edit: Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~tg

Edited by tg1911, 23 November 2008 - 02:21 AM.

-The guy with all the rarest problems of the world-

#4 dc3

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 12:13 AM

This may help you to understand.


When you take a hdd with a Windows OS installed on it that you have been using on one computer and then install it as a master in another computer you are asking for major problems. The excerpt below is from a Intel article which describes in detail what happens. The article also mentions a reference to an article by Microsoft, it can be seen here .

"Moving a hard drive with Windows* 2000 or Windows XP* already installed to a new motherboard without reinstalling the operating system is not recommended.

If a hard drive is moved to a new computer, the registry entries and drivers for the mass storage controller hardware on the new motherboard are not installed in Windows for the new computer and you may not be able to start Windows. This is documented in Microsoft's knowledge base article. This is true even if you move the hard drive to a motherboard with the same chipset, as different hardware revisions can cause this issue as well.

Additionally, moving a hard drive to a new motherboard may not exhibit any errors until you install new IDE drivers. This is because each chipset uses a different Plug-n-Play (PNP) ID to identify it. If you move your motherboard, your registry will have multiple PNP IDs (for the old hardware as well as the new hardware). If there are multiple entries in the registry, Windows cannot determine which hardware to initialize and therefore fails with a STOP error."


Alternatively, the method below can be tried, but I would back up all of your important files to removable media like CDs, DVDs, Flash drives, or a second hdd.

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/moving_xp.html

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#5 Typhoon859

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 01:27 AM

Thank you very much for the info. That does explain many things. One thing though is that I have Windows Vista and many of those things have been changed for the better. Plus, to solve these problems, wouldn't upgrading my operating system help? That's practically a clean installation of Windows while still keeping all the programs. It's pretty much a reinstallation without formatting. To a smaller degree, how about repairing Windows?


Mod Edit: Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~tg

Edited by tg1911, 23 November 2008 - 02:20 AM.

-The guy with all the rarest problems of the world-

#6 tg1911

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 02:20 AM

Typhoon859,
When replying to a post, don't use the QUOTE button under the post, unless there is something specifically in the post, that you want to quote.
Either use the button at the top of the page labeled Add Reply, or one of the 2 buttons at the bottom of the page, labeled Fast Reply, and Add Reply.
It keeps from cluttering up the board with unnecessary quotes. :thumbsup:
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#7 Typhoon859

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 02:25 AM

Alright. The reason I quote is so that they know that they received a response. Or.. t doesn't work that way?... Maybe I'm too used to YouTube.
-The guy with all the rarest problems of the world-

#8 tg1911

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 03:01 AM

That's not necessary.
If they are subscribed to this topic, they will be notified of any response posted.
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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#9 Typhoon859

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 03:11 AM

And if not, quoting them doesn't make a difference right?
-The guy with all the rarest problems of the world-

#10 tg1911

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 03:11 AM

Correct. :thumbsup:
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#11 rigacci

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 07:57 AM

That is all good stuff that dc3 gave you. :thumbsup:

For creating a pseudo-RAID1 can be done using ROBOCOPY. Read up on it and you will find it may be just what you are looking for.

Here are a couple of links to info about ROBOCOPY. :flowers:


http://photography-on-the.net/forum/archiv...p/t-154645.html


http://www.matthewjmiller.net/howtos/backu...using-robocopy/


Good luck. :trumpet:


DR

#12 hamluis

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 12:36 PM

I recommend such...for other persons :thumbsup:...but I myself would try moving the hard drive, removing drivers/installing drivers, doing a repair install of XP, etc.

I've done it successfully, paying no mind at all to the chipset...but I would not count on that occurring every time I attempted such.

Doing a clean install doesn't bother me when I screw up, but it does bother many.

Louis

#13 Typhoon859

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 10:16 PM

Well, I did it. I switched from the EVGA 680i motherboard to the 750i. Everything was fine. I just uninstalled all the NVIDIA Drivers from "Programs and Features" one by one (without restarting because of fear of not being able to boot up again), then I used Driver Sweeper to clear the remains, then I deleted the remaining files in the NVIDIA folders manually, and finally, I just installed the latest motherboard drivers from the site which I downloaded before-hand. I restarted and installed the rest of the drivers I needed and wanted. I have done MemTest and ran Prime95, 12 hours each, and my computer checked out. I haven't had a problem for three days already - not one. This was specifically with Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit so if you have the same operating system, I don't see why it shouldn't work for you and work for me.

Edited by Typhoon859, 04 December 2008 - 10:58 PM.

-The guy with all the rarest problems of the world-




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