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Help with RDP and Understanding Networking


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#1 jtphenom

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 09:30 PM

I'm really confused about a few things, and maybe some of you fine folks can help me out.

First of all, no matter what I do, I can't access my Remote Desktop, from inside my network or outside my network. I have XP Media Center (so Pro), and I'm in a basement getting a connection from a Netgear WGR614v7 router connected to my f-in-law's computer. I've set up port forwarding for 3389 and have the firewall on there set the right way, have allowed it on my computer as well, etc. I don't know what else to do.

Here are some things I'm confused about:

1. Since we're already using the same router, shouldn't the comp upstairs and my comp already have automatically formed a network?

2. If so, then why don't I see his computer on my network? And, again, is there any difference beteen the network that was formed just by hooking everything up to the router and a network that would be formed if I clicked on the "Set up a wireless network for a home or small office" button?

3. To use the OTHER button that says "Set up a home or small office network," would I have to be connected through Ethernet cables or something instead of wirelessly? Or would either of those buttons work to set up a wirless network (the one I'm not even sure would be different than the network I'm on just by using the router signal)?

That's all for now. As you can see, I'm just having a very difficult time understanding how it all works.

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#2 jtphenom

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 09:26 PM

Can nobody here answer my questions? I guess I'm not as dumb as I thought I was. HA! :thumbsup:

#3 E-Mu

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 05:29 AM

Hi,

Sorry for the wait.

First of all i will do this as two seperate post to try and avoid confusion.

Network Set-up
If it's just a simple network between two computers to share files and printers etc then use the "Set up a home or small office network" option you mentioned. The set-up will make all the adjustments and then you just save the set-up to a USB Drive or CD and insert this into the 2nd computer and run the set-up file. Bob's your uncle thats it.

Your systems do not have to be connected to the router via the Ethernet cable, my laptop run's wireless and is able to access files without any problems. (and thats to a Vista machine aswell :thumbsup:)
~ E-Mu ~

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"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#4 E-Mu

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 05:31 AM

Remote Desktop Connection

To set up the Remote Desktop, start with the host computer, which in this example is your work computer.

1.Verify that you are signed in as the administrator.

2.Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance.

3.Click System.

4.Click the Remote tab, select the Allow users to connect remotely to this computer check box, and then click OK.


Next, make sure you have Windows Firewall set up to allow exceptions.

1.In the Control Panel, click Security Center.

2.Under Manage security settings for, click Windows Firewall.

3.Make sure the Don't allow exceptions check box is not selected.

4.Click the Exceptions tab, and verify that the Remote Desktop check box is selected.

5.Click OK, and then close the Windows Security Center window.

Your host computer is now set up to allow remote access.


You will need the name of the host computer.

6.In Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click System, and then click the Computer Name tab.

7.Write down the full computer name, and then click OK.

8.Close Control Panel.

9.Leave this computer running, locked, and connected to the network with Internet access.


Connect your remote computer to the host computer

To connect your home computer, which is the client (or remote) computer to your work (or host) computer, follow these steps:

1.On your home computer, click Start, point to All Programs, and then point to Accessories.

2.In the Accessories menu, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

3.In the Computer box, type the computer name of your host computer, which you wrote down earlier.

4.Click Connect.

5.When the Log On to Windows dialog box appears, type your user name, password, and domain (if required), and then click OK.


The Remote Desktop window opens, and you see the desktop settings, files, and programs that are on your host computer, which in this example is your work computer. Your host computer remains locked, and nobody can access it without a password. In addition, no one will be able to see the work you are doing remotely.

~ E-Mu ~

"Emu, You Moo, We All Moo for Emu!" <-- Thanks to Animal

"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#5 jtphenom

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 09:56 AM

Hi,

Sorry for the wait.

No problem! :flowers:

Network Set-up
If it's just a simple network between two computers to share files and printers etc then use the "Set up a home or small office network" option you mentioned.

But if it's wireless, would I use the wireless version of that same wizard, or no?

The set-up will make all the adjustments and then you just save the set-up to a USB Drive or CD and insert this into the 2nd computer and run the set-up file. Bob's your uncle thats it.

What's "Bob's your uncle" mean? And can you please explain why I need the USB or CD? Why can't I just use the same wizard on both computers and set the same exact settings? What does the USB or CD do?

Your systems do not have to be connected to the router via the Ethernet cable, my laptop run's wireless and is able to access files without any problems. (and thats to a Vista machine aswell :thumbsup:)

I knew this part. Thanks!

#6 jtphenom

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 10:00 AM

Remote Desktop Connection

To set up the Remote Desktop, start with the host computer, which in this example is your work computer.

1.Verify that you are signed in as the administrator.

2.Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance.

3.Click System.

4.Click the Remote tab, select the Allow users to connect remotely to this computer check box, and then click OK.


Next, make sure you have Windows Firewall set up to allow exceptions.

1.In the Control Panel, click Security Center.

2.Under Manage security settings for, click Windows Firewall.

3.Make sure the Don't allow exceptions check box is not selected.

4.Click the Exceptions tab, and verify that the Remote Desktop check box is selected.

5.Click OK, and then close the Windows Security Center window.

Your host computer is now set up to allow remote access.


You will need the name of the host computer.

6.In Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click System, and then click the Computer Name tab.

7.Write down the full computer name, and then click OK.

8.Close Control Panel.

9.Leave this computer running, locked, and connected to the network with Internet access.


Connect your remote computer to the host computer

To connect your home computer, which is the client (or remote) computer to your work (or host) computer, follow these steps:

1.On your home computer, click Start, point to All Programs, and then point to Accessories.

2.In the Accessories menu, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

3.In the Computer box, type the computer name of your host computer, which you wrote down earlier.

4.Click Connect.

5.When the Log On to Windows dialog box appears, type your user name, password, and domain (if required), and then click OK.


The Remote Desktop window opens, and you see the desktop settings, files, and programs that are on your host computer, which in this example is your work computer. Your host computer remains locked, and nobody can access it without a password. In addition, no one will be able to see the work you are doing remotely.

1. Actually, my home computer is the one I'm trying to connect to from other computers.

2. All that is listed in the "Full computer name" section is the name I gave it when I bought the computer, which is "R2D2."

3. I've tried all of this stuff, and it doesn't work. I checked my firewall settings, forwarded my port 3389 on my router, set my computer to allow RDC, and I go to another computer and type my router's IP address in the "Computer Name" box, and it won't work. :thumbsup:

#7 E-Mu

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 10:31 AM

But if it's wireless, would I use the wireless version of that same wizard, or no?

Nope just the "Set up a home or small office network"

What's "Bob's your uncle" mean? And can you please explain why I need the USB or CD? Why can't I just use the same wizard on both computers and set the same exact settings? What does the USB or CD do?

Bob's your uncle is just an expression. I use a USB Flash Drive to transfer the settings from one computer to another, you can if you want write down the settings and use them on the other computer but it leaves more things to go wrong if they don't match, using a USB Flash Drive to transfer the settings rules out the possibilty of mistakes.

All that is listed in the "Full computer name" section is the name I gave it when I bought the computer, which is "R2D2."

R2D2 is your computer name, you can use this or the IP address to try and connect through RDC.


Try getting the network set-up 1st and then we can look at the RDC if this is still not working.

Have a look at some of the network guides here on BC.
~ E-Mu ~

"Emu, You Moo, We All Moo for Emu!" <-- Thanks to Animal

"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#8 jtphenom

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 10:44 AM

Bob's your uncle is just an expression.

I knew that much. I wanted to know what it meant. :thumbsup:

I use a USB Flash Drive to transfer the settings from one computer to another, you can if you want write down the settings and use them on the other computer but it leaves more things to go wrong if they don't match, using a USB Flash Drive to transfer the settings rules out the possibilty of mistakes.

Great point!

R2D2 is your computer name, you can use this or the IP address to try and connect through RDC.

If I connect from outside my network, you're saying I can just type R2D2 in the RDC Computer Name box and it will work? I wouldn't need a domain or something? Not that it matters, really, cause I usually try to do it by typing in my IP address (or my router's IP, rather).

Try getting the network set-up 1st and then we can look at the RDC if this is still not working.

Alright I'll try to set up the network when I get the chance. I would have already done this, but I figured I didn't need to since I'm already connected through the router upstairs, and so is the other computer.

Have a look at some of the network guides here on BC.

I actually read those already.

Edited by jtphenom, 24 November 2008 - 10:45 AM.


#9 E-Mu

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 11:25 AM

Not entirely sure what the expression means to be honest lol.

I also use my IP Address when connecting via RDC rather than name, but the name is suppose to work just as good(you might need the domain when connecting with the name tho i'm not sure)
Also you will need to be using you computers IP Address not the routers, if you are using the routers IP Address you aint going to get access to the computer. :thumbsup:
~ E-Mu ~

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"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#10 jtphenom

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 11:30 AM

Not entirely sure what the expression means to be honest lol.

I also use my IP Address when connecting via RDC rather than name, but the name is suppose to work just as good(you might need the domain when connecting with the name tho i'm not sure)
Also you will need to be using you computers IP Address not the routers, if you are using the routers IP Address you aint going to get access to the computer. :thumbsup:

OK now I'm really confused. I thought the whole point of port forwarding on the router was so that it would know that any requests it received for RDC should be forwarded to the computer that was specified in the port forward setting. I've been to a whole bunch of different websites saying this is what you're supposed to do. Besides, my IP and the router's IP, and the IP of the other computer connecting to the router all have the same IP.

ETA: In other words, they all have the same EXTERNAL IP. I set my port forward for 3389 to go to my internal IP of 192.168.1.xx. So when I type in my computers (and the router's) external IP from another computer in the RDC Computer Name box, it sends the request to my computer's internal IP of 192.168.1.xx.

This is the same thing they tell you to do on other sites, such as www.portforward.com.

Edited by jtphenom, 24 November 2008 - 11:33 AM.


#11 E-Mu

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 02:56 PM

OK now I'm really confused. I thought the whole point of port forwarding on the router was so that it would know that any requests it received for RDC should be forwarded to the computer that was specified in the port forward setting. I've been to a whole bunch of different websites saying this is what you're supposed to do. Besides, my IP and the router's IP, and the IP of the other computer connecting to the router all have the same IP.

ETA: In other words, they all have the same EXTERNAL IP. I set my port forward for 3389 to go to my internal IP of 192.168.1.xx. So when I type in my computers (and the router's) external IP from another computer in the RDC Computer Name box, it sends the request to my computer's internal IP of 192.168.1.xx.

This is the same thing they tell you to do on other sites, such as www.portforward.com.

Hmmmm im not 100% now, its been that long since i set my system up for RDC that i forgot what i did, i know it wasn't straight forward, plus i use a couple of 3rd party software's depending on where i am. Set it up as described on www.portforward.com and then when you try to access it you can try to see which IP works.

You say all the IP addresses are the same...... for your router you should have 192.168.1.1, then each computer should go up from there like 192.168.1.2 then 192.168.1.3 etc
~ E-Mu ~

"Emu, You Moo, We All Moo for Emu!" <-- Thanks to Animal

"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#12 jtphenom

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 03:43 PM

Hmmmm im not 100% now, its been that long since i set my system up for RDC that i forgot what i did, i know it wasn't straight forward, plus i use a couple of 3rd party software's depending on where i am. Set it up as described on www.portforward.com and then when you try to access it you can try to see which IP works.

Yes I tried doing everything portforward.com says to do. It still won't work.

You say all the IP addresses are the same...... for your router you should have 192.168.1.1, then each computer should go up from there like 192.168.1.2 then 192.168.1.3 etc

I mean that all of my external IP addresses are the same; they match the one assigned to the router - 76.100.xxx.xxx.

My INTERNAL IP addresses are as you said, although there are only three. The standard one for the router, with a 1 at the end, the one dynamically assigned to the computer that is hooked to the router has a 2 at the end, and mine is set up to use a static IP, which is outside of the range defined on the router. In other words, I have my router set to assign IP addresses from 2 to 10 or something, and mine has 15 at the end.

#13 E-Mu

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 04:03 PM

Have you got the network set up yet? If not do that first.

Can i also just ask are you only looking to use the RDC internally or are you going to be connecting in from another source outside of your home network (once up and running)
~ E-Mu ~

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"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"


#14 jtphenom

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Posted 26 November 2008 - 10:02 PM

OK I set the network up just the way the wizard said to do. But I still could not connect to my computer from the other one. How do I tell if the network is set up the way it's supposed to be?

Can i also just ask are you only looking to use the RDC internally or are you going to be connecting in from another source outside of your home network (once up and running)

I'd like to use it from outside of my network. But at this point, like I said, I can't get it to work from inside OR outside my network.

#15 E-Mu

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Posted 27 November 2008 - 04:56 AM

Try Pinging the IP Address of each computer from the other one, this will show if the networks set up correctly.

To ping go to Start > Run and type cmd, then hit enter key
The command prompt should open, type "ipconfig /a" (disregard the quotation)
You should see the ip address of the computer you're using
Go to the other computer and open up the command prompt
By typing ping + the ip address of the other computer (i.e. "ping 192.168.1.128") you should get a response of 4packets received.
~ E-Mu ~

"Emu, You Moo, We All Moo for Emu!" <-- Thanks to Animal

"If at first you don't succeed; call it version 1.0"





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