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CPU socket? Motherboard/Case fitting?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 2zzgtte

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 05:58 PM

Hey, I am building my own computer which I partly did a long time ago. This was when "socket A" was the only socket..... Now I have no idea where the rest of these numbers come in. I am looking for an AMD core duo. I am looking at AMD core duo 6400+. Is there a certain socket that goes with all core duo's? If yes, then I'm on the right track. If no, then I'm totally lost.


Next question.

I am looking around for cases and will any motherboard fit in any case? like screw-wise? will all the screw holes line up? Or is there a certain case for a certain motherboard?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!


Oh, and any recommendations for motherboard for this processor? Or should I go for a different processor?

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#2 Sterling14

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 10:27 PM

Welcome to bleepingcomputer!

With current AMD X2 processor's, they all use the AMD socket referred as AM2. Some of the newer motherboards have socket AM2+ which is for the newer quad-core Phenom processor's. These are pretty much the same from the physical stand point, meaning they fit the same processor's. The only difference is that the AM2+ speed's up the quad-core's, but doesn't give a boost to dual-cores (it doesn't slow the dual-core's down though). Since you're getting a dual-core it doesn't really matter if you go with socket AM2 or AM2+. Just make sure the processor you're looking at uses socket AM2 or AM2+, and then find a motherboard that uses AM2 or AM2+ (like I mentioned before, they're interchangeable both ways, but you may be better off just going with an AM2+ motherboard).

The standard size for cases and motherboards is referred as ATX. There are some variations though, such as micro-ATX. This is a little smaller than regular ATX. A micro-ATX motherboard will fit in a regular ATX case, but a regular sized ATX motherboard won't fit in a micro-ATX board.

I don't know of a specific motherboard to get, but some of the better companies are Asus, Gigabyte, and MSI. There's others, but these are probably the best three. You may want to look into getting a motherboard with an AMD 780 or 790 chipset. They usually have good feature's and the best integrated graphics.

I hope this helps, and if you need anymore help, let us know! :thumbsup:
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#3 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 04:43 AM

Most motherboards follow the ATX standard, meaning they should fit into ATX cases. There are mid and full tower cases, the full tower cases are roomier and allow for more components, but are often large, heavy, and more expensive. For the current generation of AMD processors, you need a Socket AM2+ to use the processor.

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#4 2zzgtte

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 01:13 PM

That is perfect! It has been bothering me for like 2 weeks. I had no idea what was going on. If you guys say those 3 brand names were pretty good, then what about this motherboard/processor combo:

http://www.partspc.com/ProductDetails.asp?...p;ProdID=13684#


Or do you think I could find a better deal somewhere else? or a better combo at that?



1 more question. Why is the "EVGA" graphics cards so much more than all the rest? I have a PNY i just recently bought, and is there that big a difference then the EVGA brand?

#5 hamluis

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 02:53 PM

In general (not always)...you should check www.newegg.com and www.tigerdirect.com for price comparisons on parts before deciding to purchase elsewhere.

From what I see, TD is more likely to offer a motherboard bundle that includes processors/boards which are not "this month's news", while Newegg will have a smaller quantity of older components but attune itself to those more interested in more recent components.

In any case, it's wise to check each website before making any decision (IMO).

The 3d site I would recommend is www.pricewatch.com, but you need to take your time to survey all the choices.

Louis

PS: Always look for free shipping, if possible.

Edited by hamluis, 21 November 2008 - 02:54 PM.


#6 garmanma

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 02:57 PM

Whenever I buy parts from someone for the first time, I check them out at:
http://www.resellerratings.com/
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#7 2zzgtte

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 04:09 PM

Does Nvidia make good motherboards?


And whats with the "PC-####" and the "PC2-####" for ram?

Sorry so many questions. I have been out of the loop for a while.

#8 smurfgod

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 04:33 PM

Nvidia really doesnt make the boards. People use their chipsets in their boards. Pretty sure someone mentioned it up there, but Gigabyte Asus and BFG make good boards.
The main thing with RAM is to match up the type first off. DDR, DDR2, DDR3 they are NOT interchangeable. with that board you linked up there you want to buy DDR2 preferably at 1066 MHz to get the optimum value from it. you can buy at lower speeds like 800 MHz or even 533, but you'll be bottlenecking yourself when you really don't need to with as cheap as RAM is. You can also buy a higher speed RAM if you choose, but the board will underclock it to 1066 anyhow so you're kinda wasting your money. Crucial is a good RAM manufacturer. There are other good ones too, but you really don't want to put in bargain basement RAM into your machine.

Edited by smurfgod, 21 November 2008 - 04:36 PM.


#9 hamluis

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 04:46 PM

Learn to use Google, particularly when reviewing specs. It's easy, there's a wealth of info...and it will probably keep you from making a mistake when it comes to assembling/buying your components.

Louis




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