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Networking, Please help


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5 replies to this topic

#1 lmt_box

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 07:52 PM

Hi ,
I want to set up a wireless network for 2 computers.

1) What do I need, router, hub or switch? to have
- two computes can be on internet at the same time.
or either one is online and the other one is offline.

2) what bran name is less trouble :thumbsup:.

Thank You Very Much.

lmt_box

Edited by lmt_box, 18 November 2008 - 08:02 PM.


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#2 Daniel3679

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 08:08 PM

For this you will need a wireless router, i have always found d-link to be a good and hassle free brand.
Dan - If its not broken dont fix it

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#3 Joshuacat

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 08:14 PM

You need a wireless router. My preference for routers is Linksys or Dlink. With routers you get what you pay for. I would check out some of the online retailers and see what is the best fit for you. Most routers are either G or N, and that just refers to the speed of the router. If you not going to stream videos, or make this part of a bigger home network that shares gaming/media/ large network files than G is quite exceptable. Once you get the wireless router, whatever the make/model, make sure that you enable the security features. There will be a whole list of options, but WPA2/AES is the best setting for securing your router. Another thing you may want to consider is changing the default password of the router. This will help protect your network from unwanted guests. Good luck.
JC

#4 lmt_box

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 11:27 AM

Thanks all for the replies,
Joshuacat, that's great, If you help to chose one. :thumbsup:
I think I'll get wireless n, I took a look at Linksys' and D-link's
There're many models!!
I only do basic internet stuff surf researching.., small apartment.

Thanks again

lmt_box

#5 bama_fan

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 12:58 PM

i would make sure (if you haven't already) that your pc's have a wifi card compatible with N.....if they are laptops (unless you purchased them recently) will likely only support A,B,G.....you may be planning on buying all new equipment anyway....just thought i'd mention it....
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#6 chimo79

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 01:54 PM

I have a Linksys WRT150N but it is somewhat dated. Today, I would get a WRT310N which is somewhat more robust. Its features are:

Internet-sharing Router and 4-port Gigabit Switch, with a built in speed and range enhanced Wireless Access Point
MIMO technology uses multiple radios per band to create robust signals for maximum range and speed, with reduced dead spots
Much faster than Wireless-G, but also works great with Wireless-G and -B devices
Wireless signals are protected by industrial-strength encryption, and your network is protected from Internet attacks by a powerful SPI firewall


I am sure D-Link has a similar product. Linksys is a Cisco company - the de facto standard in network hardware.

It is important that any N router also be compatible with the G and B protocols. I recently added a Wii game console to my network and it is G only. It is also important that the router (actually a router/hub) also have hardwire ports (typically 4). It is desirable to connect to your LAN via a wired CAT5 cable. It is more reliable and very likely faster. Because the router will very likely be located in close proximity to one of your desktop machines and because most desktops do not have a wireless card (but always have a wired connection) it is easier/better/faster/cheaper to use a wired port in this case. The other machines where portability is important or where the location dictates, can use the wireless ports. There are only 4 ports. When one is used as wireless, it is not available as wired and vice versa. Four ports are not too many. Each PC uses one, a network printer uses one, a scanner might use one, a NAS drive enclosure uses one, a Wii console needs one and a guest pc would need one. Oh ya, I think any Media Center Extender would also need one so the 4 ports are quickly used up. The built in firewall is also important. It is a far more effective firewall than any software firewall you could implement.

Implementation was very easy and went very smoothly under Vista. The only device that did not add completely automatically was the idiot Wii console. Nintendo doesn't seem to be very dood at this business and their explanations leave much to trial and error. But, my wife now has her Wii Fit all set up. :thumbsup: Both my PCs, my laptop and my NAS drives all went without a hitch.

Edited by chimo79, 19 November 2008 - 01:58 PM.





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