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Power Surge


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#1 DSTM

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:19 AM

Hi Guys,The PC I was on, just suffered a Power Surge. Any clues what to look at,as the Tower is dead?
Thanks in advance.















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#2 E-Mu

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:31 AM

Hi,

Do you have anything coming on at all, lights or fans etc?

You may be lucky and just have a dead power supply and hopefully it'll not be a fried motherboard or chip.
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#3 DSTM

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:46 AM

Thanks for the quick reply,Emu 1616. There were no storms at the time.I have an expensive Surge Protector fitted.
The Tower is dead,no lights, fans anything on. Best take it to a Shop,you think,because I have no idea how to check the Parts that may be damaged? Thanks.

EDIT.Definately a power surge because all the lights in the house went off and on twice.

Edited by DSTM, 30 October 2008 - 10:51 AM.















#4 E-Mu

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 11:23 AM

I have an expensive Surge Protector fitted.

Are you sure the problems are caused by the power surge, this surge protector should have protected.

If you not sure about opening your PC and testing the parts to see if there dead then i'd advise to take it in and have a professional look at it for you.
~ E-Mu ~

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#5 DSTM

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 11:39 AM

I'm sure, as both PC'S went off, at the same time, as the power surge happened.This one started again and said, start in last known good configuration,which I did.
I will take the Tower and get a quote,and thanks so much for your time, Emu1616.Much appreciated. :thumbsup:















#6 dc3

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 11:46 AM

Is there any power coming out of the surge protector?

What makes you think it was a surge rather than just an outage?

If it was a surge there is a chance that the fuse in the PSU was blown. If you have a multimeter you can use the Ohms scale to check the continuity of the fuse. These are usually pc mounted and would required removing by unsoldering the fuse, cleaning out the hole, and soldering in the new one. You should be aware of the fact that the capacitors inside the PSU will hold a line voltage for a very long time which can give you a very nasty shock. These are pc mounted as well, in this picture you can see the electrolytic capacitors in the forefront right side, the two black cylinders. Yours may not be black but should be proportionate to those. Be careful to avoid touching the two potentials on the soldered side of the board and, and only touch the board with one hand while keeping the other away from any grounded surface.

To determine if the problem is with the motherboard or the PSU, you can use the following technique.


The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

At this point you can use a DC Voltmeter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent plus or minus of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC


To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

Edited by dc3, 30 October 2008 - 12:11 PM.

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#7 DSTM

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 11:56 AM

I have an OHMS meter, and an array of small soldering irons,and Flux,so I will have a look at it later today.4AM now.
The Surge protector has no light on.Just written,240V, 50HZ,10AMP.
I can follow those instructions, you posted DC3 quite easily. Thanks for that. :thumbsup:
Will update when I know more.















#8 usasma

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 02:02 PM

Just FYI - my wife's office was hit by lightning twice in the span of 10 minutes last summer.
The first strike was protected by the surge protectors - but when they turned everything back on (and the second strike hit), the surge protectors didn't protect anything.

Lesson learned - we bought new surge protectors that will reset - and we have layered surge protection on the criticial systems.
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#9 DSTM

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 02:24 AM

UPDATE.
I couldn't get any readings so I took the Tower to the Shop, for testing.
I recently bought a pc off them so hoped they wouldn't shaft me.
The power supply was kapoot.
Tested, installed a 500W to replace the 400W. All for $38 AUD. So I am more than happy.
USASMA, The best Surge Protector backup, they have is an Office Pro UPS, for $105 AUD.Don't know how good they are.
All working again,so thanks Guys, for steering me in the right direction, :thumbsup:















#10 E-Mu

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 04:03 AM

Thank god it was only the power supply and nothing more serious or expensive.

Glad you got it sorted mate.
~ E-Mu ~

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