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Can I use the WindowsXP disc I currently have?


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#1 Fishman0422

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 05:52 PM

My computer was purchased back in '01. The mother board that came with it can only handle up to a 2.0GHZ processor. While I have been able to find 2.0 pentium4 processors they have all been of the 478 socket type. It turns out I have the 423 socket, LUCKY ME! I cannot find it anywhere! I would prefer to upgrade my current computer rather than purchasing a new one. So far I have already replaced the hard drive (because I had to), increased my memory from 512MB to 1GIG, and purchased a new graphics card. Unfortunately I have already had problems with artifacting using that graphics card. I have tried without success to fix that problem without results....long story. Without purchasing a new motherboard I think I have taken this computer as far as It can go. The reason I have decided to upgrade is Spore. The only game I play on my computer is the Sims2, now I want Spore. One of Spore's system requirements is a 2.0GHz processor. I went to Tigerdirect.com and priced a motherboard, processor, 1GIG of memory, and a graphics card for about $245. I've been told a windows XP install comes on 1 disc. I DO have the operating system on one disc, other than 6 worksuite discs and one money disc but of course, they are not part of the OS. I have done quite a few searches and I cannot find, in definate terms, if I can use this disc. I was happy to have this disc because most people I know had gotten their computers in more recent years than I, and do not have an install disc. As I had mentioned, I had put in a new hard drive. The two of the three things I had read online that I would NOT be able to do is change my hard drive or my motherboard with a restore disc. If I had copied and transferred the info from the original hard drive it could then be done. I don't think this was the case. While I am definately not a computer whiz, I was even less of one back then. A friend of mine helped me with it. I am pretty darned sure we just pulled it out and put in the new one. I'm almost positive we had to reinstall windows, I was starting from scratch, I THINK. I cannot ask my friend because he no longer is one. I'm not positive THIS means anything, but I did do a repair install AND a clean install recently with that disc without any problems - something I read online I would need an actual install disc for. I didn't even bother with worksuite or money. I'm living paycheck to paycheck here. As it is, although $245 is a great price, I will have to charge it and I would hate to have to add an approximate $135 for another XP disc. As far as I'm concerned after the crap load of money I shelled out for the computer I have now I PAID FOR my genuine copy of WindowsXP!

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 06:26 PM

Reality is one thing, legality might be another.

The reality is that you can probably (key word there) install XP on the new system and use that license for activation.

Legally, that might not be what is expected by Microsoft, if one follows their EULA and strictly interprets/enforces it...and if you have an OEM version of XP.

My approach is: Try it and don't be surprised at which way it goes.

I have about 10 XP licenses and most of them are MS OEM versions...which are supposed to be glued to one motherboard/system. In reality, I have upgraded/replaced any number of things on systems with several of these licenses (motherboard, hard drives, RAM, etc.) and I've never been denied activation for any system.

I have done the telephonic activation several times (when the ethernet/auto activation detects a change of key components) but I have been successful every time.

My suspicion is that the Activation Police...have never acted as police at all. In fact, much of the telephonic thing is now entirely automated. I suspect that they (Microsoft or the agency representing them) do everything that they can to see to it that a user is not using an illegal or invalid license...and that a user is not using the same license/key on multiple machines (the way that many of us installed Windows 95 and 98 on miltiple systems with one valid license).

And they seem to bend over backward to help those with valid licenses, IMO.

I'd just like to clarify one point: You paid to use that one copy of "genuine Windows" in accordance with the terms of the EULA, not in accordance with your whim. Perhaps you ought to read that sometime, just to get the feel for what you seem not to understand.

Louis

#3 Fishman0422

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 09:28 PM

Legally, that might not be what is expected by Microsoft, if one follows their EULA and strictly interprets/enforces it...and if you have an OEM version of XP.
I'd just like to clarify one point: You paid to use that one copy of "genuine Windows" in accordance with the terms of the EULA, not in accordance with your whim. Perhaps you ought to read that sometime, just to get the feel for what you seem not to understand.

Louis


Louis, First thank you for your response! Second, I think I was a little misunderstood. Not that you don't know what I'm trying to do but rather what my intentions are, or what I was truly getting at. I was under the impression that Microsoft one day said "Hey wait a minute! People are going to use our programs over and over! If we prevent that we can make more money from all of the software we'll be able to sell again and again." I thought that was how the whole End License User Agreement and the OEM versions came about. I thought that those of us who were lucky enough to have one of the older computers with copies of XP on discs were nothing but fortunate. Rather than having only the option of system restoring to the exact condition our computers were in straight from the box, WE HAD THE SOFTWARE! You yourself mentioned IF I had a OEM version, I thought IF I didn't have the OEM version it was transferable. If I was able to transfer over information from hard drive to hard drive or motherboard to motherboard, Microsoft might not like it, but I didn't think it would be illegal. AND I certainly didn't think Microsoft would be lenient or bend over backwards for me. I just thought if I would be able to use the disc if it wasn't an OEM version and if it wasn't I wouldn't that's all. I thought for sure they would deny activation. Being that I didn't experience any problems installing the new hard drive and, other than mild confusion (I didn't need the product key or administative password or something), when I did the reinstall. I thought I could use the disc at my whimsy, but only because I could. Obviously there may be some things I don't understand about this topic but as for my comment "As far as I'm concerned after the crap load of money I shelled out for the computer I have now I PAID FOR my genuine copy of WindowsXP!" it is more my opinion than a misunderstanding. For example a fishing license is for a year, a driver's license for 4, any legal contract has a specific amount of time intended. You could buy a computer and it, or a vital part of it, could fail two years after your purchase it. Mine could go on for eight or nine years theoretically and yet about the same amount of money that you and I spent went to that software. I just don't think that's fair. It's not like that software isn't expensive and it's not a product I paid for. LOL If I bought a car I can keep on adding parts to it to keep it running. I can even remove a motor from a car, rebuild it, and put it in another. If I was to make copies of my disc and sell it, clearly that would be wrong. The ELUA? I get it, believe me I get it, I just don't think it's right. And I thought it possibly didn't apply in this case. Thanks again for your help. This stuff still confuses me a bit from time to time and you've given me hope.
-Bill

#4 Platypus

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 04:25 AM

I was under the impression that Microsoft one day said "Hey wait a minute! People are going to use our programs over and over! If we prevent that we can make more money from all of the software we'll be able to sell again and again." I thought that was how the whole End License User Agreement and the OEM versions came about....

No, OEM has always been a different license, less expensive to purchase but whoever builds the computer is responsible for supporting the system owner if they have problems, and the license doesn't have transfer rights to another system. The choice is between OEM and a boxed retail product. OEM may or may not also include a CD/DVD, but it's whether it's an OEM license that decides. The EULA that accompanies the specific product is to explain how the purchaser can legitimately use it.

I thought IF I didn't have the OEM version it was transferable.

Correct, if your copy of XP is not OEM, that is, it was a full retail copy you purchased, then that license is transferrable. With the retail version, you purchased to right to use the software on any single computer of your choice. Microsoft is not concerned how many times it is re-used and re-activated, as long as it is ever only installed on one computer at a time.

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#5 Fishman0422

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 07:51 PM

I was under the impression that Microsoft one day said "Hey wait a minute! People are going to use our programs over and over! If we prevent that we can make more money from all of the software we'll be able to sell again and again." I thought that was how the whole End License User Agreement and the OEM versions came about....

No, OEM has always been a different license, less expensive to purchase but whoever builds the computer is responsible for supporting the system owner if they have problems, and the license doesn't have transfer rights to another system. The choice is between OEM and a boxed retail product. OEM may or may not also include a CD/DVD, but it's whether it's an OEM license that decides. The EULA that accompanies the specific product is to explain how the purchaser can legitimately use it.

I thought IF I didn't have the OEM version it was transferable.

Correct, if your copy of XP is not OEM, that is, it was a full retail copy you purchased, then that license is transferrable. With the retail version, you purchased to right to use the software on any single computer of your choice. Microsoft is not concerned how many times it is re-used and re-activated, as long as it is ever only installed on one computer at a time.

Thanks Platypus! I think you've cleared things up for sure! I guess I will have to purchase my own copy and maybe I'll swap computers with my son and He can have mine. I'll just rebuild his.




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