Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Maximum Hard Drive Capacity


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 trumpetman51

trumpetman51

  • Members
  • 105 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, NY 13440
  • Local time:10:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 11:08 AM


Hello Bleeping Computer enthusiasts,

I have an old Micron Cn ClientPro PC. The motherboard is an Intel D815EEA which, of course, has the Intel 815 Chipset. the CPU is an Intel 900MHz Celeron. My BIOS is up to date as far as Intel is concerned as this MOBO is an older model. QUITE OLDER, I realize.

Anyway, my question is, what is the MAXIMUM size IDE Hard Drive I can install in my PC that the BIOS will recognize. I want to put in at least a 500GB HD but I am reasonably sure that the BIOS will NOT allow it or rather it will only show up as a much smaller Drive.

What can I do short of buying a new PC or MOBO??

Thanks,

trumpetman51
(John)
"The right direction's all that counts and there's no way for me to get there late!!"

trumpetman51 (John)

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,281 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:09:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 11:50 AM

It's not your BIOS that determines maximum hard drive size these days...it's the operating system.

As long as you have XP SP1 (or a later version) as the O/S you install...there is no size barrier to be considered.

Louis

#3 trumpetman51

trumpetman51
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 105 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, NY 13440
  • Local time:10:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 12:17 PM

"It's not your BIOS that determines maximum hard drive size these days...it's the operating system.

As long as you have XP SP1 (or a later version) as the O/S you install...there is no size barrier to be considered.

Louis"

Hi Louis, thanks for replying! I am a bit confused here. Not by what you said, but rather by the fact that when I tried to install a 320GB HD in another PC I had (which DID have an older Intel chipset and diffferent BIOS) after I installed the drive and started the PC it only "saw" the drive as 120GB...I think....the point I am trying to make is that the computer would NOT recognize the actual size of the Hard Drive. When I asked at a local computer repair shop they told me that I needed to add a PCI Board that provides it's own IDE connection and BIOS thereby allowing the installation of the larger Hard Drive. They didn't say anything about my OS!

Is it me??

Again, thanks for the reply!!

John
"The right direction's all that counts and there's no way for me to get there late!!"

trumpetman51 (John)

#4 dpunisher

dpunisher

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,234 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South TX
  • Local time:09:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 02:30 PM

http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/iaa/sb/cs-009299.htm

From what I can decipher, you should be good to go if you have XP SP1/WIN 2K SP4 or above with that chipset. Older chipsets did require a seperate IDE controller card or a BIOS overlay to work correctly.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#5 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,281 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:09:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 03:03 PM

LOL...who are you going to believe...us or your local computer repair shop? Dpunisher was quite correct.

We're not trying to sell you anything or charge you for our "services" :thumbsup:...and the fact that there are many more persons here with sufficient knowledge to guide in some computer circumstances, if not all...should be enough to convince you.

Then, of course, you could always Google and look it up...and apologize to us later :flowers:.

Here's a link: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=X...mp;aq=f&oq= No apology necessary :trumpet:.

It was a Windows barrier, not a native hardware barrier that had to be overcome.

SP1 was released Sep 2002...if you have hardware that predates that...I suppose old rules might still apply (but I doubt it, since LBA should have overcome all those).

Louis

#6 trumpetman51

trumpetman51
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 105 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, NY 13440
  • Local time:10:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 04:46 PM

Hey everyone,

I DO APOLOGIZE! I didn't mean to seem to doubt your knowledge or intentions. I only wondered because of what happened the last time I tried to install a large drive. But then again, that was a different PC with an old 440 chipset.

Again, I apologize. I hope there are no hard feelings. I wouldn't bring my question here if I didn't trust that I would get knowledgeable answers.

Thanks!

:thumbsup:
John
"The right direction's all that counts and there's no way for me to get there late!!"

trumpetman51 (John)

#7 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,281 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:09:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 04:59 PM

You're taking this too seriously, we make mistakes all the time here (because we are human).

Relax, we understand...we've all been there at some point (and will be again)...happy computing :thumbsup:.

Louis

#8 trumpetman51

trumpetman51
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 105 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rome, NY 13440
  • Local time:10:46 PM

Posted 18 October 2008 - 05:50 PM

Thanks man, that's good to hear. I've been kind of having a bad day and I think that "other" things are starting to get to me.

I really do appreciate your help, and the help of all the others on this forum that I have received in the past.

Glad to have "run into" you here!! :thumbsup:

John
"The right direction's all that counts and there's no way for me to get there late!!"

trumpetman51 (John)

#9 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,181 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:01:46 PM

Posted 19 October 2008 - 05:31 AM

Just a small caution if I may suggest it?

If 48bit LBA is implemented by the OS and not your hardware, correct access to the drive depends on the OS being active.

Keep in the back of your mind, if the board's BIOS doesn't implement 48bit LBA and that drive is accessed using a different operating environment, eg boot from a CD for drive imaging or data recovery, that environment must also provide the 48bit LBA access or you may experience data loss or drive corruption.

To give the computer store the benefit of the doubt, I suspect that's at least part of the reason for suggesting a controller card. Implementing 48bit LBA in hardware gives the best chance of it working properly in all circumstances.

Edited by Platypus, 19 October 2008 - 05:33 AM.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#10 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:10:46 PM

Posted 19 October 2008 - 02:17 PM

According to Maxtor/Segate it could be a bios issue which can be addressed by using jumpers. Or by partitioning the HDD into smaller partitions.
Limit drive capacity (or CLJ). Use this on computers manufactured before November 1998 when either you start up your computer and see the message, "Hard disc drive controller failure", your computer does not recognize your newly installed hard drive, or your system stops responding during the boot process after installing this new drive.

Seagate recommends the use of newer UltraATA cables to achieve the best performance from your new Seagate hard drive. These UltraATA cables have 3 colored connectors, each connector has a specific purpose. Be sure to plug the correct connector into the correct device.




References: Segate/Maxtor ,Pcguide
Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users