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Does this graphics card need a power supply?


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Tskales

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 05:25 AM

Hello,

I'm thinking of getting a new graphics card as my current integrated chipset is quite poor. I've been recommended the Radeon x1650pro AGP.

I've been told that this will simply be a case of plugging it in, installing it, and away we go. I've been reading about this card on other forums and most people say it's the best in this price range, they also report it needing a 400w power supply. The website for Sapphire who manufactured one of the makes of this card state that it needs a power supply of 350w.

The person who recommended me this card insists that when they were using it they didn't need additional power.

I can only just afford this card, so there's no way that i'd be able to buy a power supply aswell, or anything else i'm probably gonna need.

Can anybody help me out? Anyone ever use this particular card?

Thank you.

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#2 smurfgod

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 06:53 AM

no you don't need another power supply just for the card. You do need an adaquate one though. Also there are additional power plugs on most video cards, sometimes its just a standard 4 pin molex, sometimes a 6 pin PCIe, sometimes its an 8pin PCIe. You obviously also need the right slot on your motherboard, but I think you already covered that.

#3 Tskales

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 06:59 AM

I've been told that the card would be powered by the AGP slot and that the Radeon x1650Pro and Radeon 3650/3670 do not require a Power Connections. Is this simply not true?

#4 smurfgod

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 07:10 AM

If you buy the right kind then yes you are correct. it comes in AGP and PCIe. And the ones I saw did not have auxilliary power plugs. meaning that yes they draw all the power they need from the slot. Is your power supply rated high enough to handle it? That's what they meant by requiring 400w If you're not sure post the make/model of your computer and we'll try and figure it out without ya having to dig around looking for that sticker.

Edited by smurfgod, 13 October 2008 - 07:15 AM.


#5 Tskales

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 07:19 AM

This is roughly what it says on my PSU,

Delta Electronics

Model: DPS-300AB-19B

Input: 100-127v
47Hz-63Hz 200-240v

Output: +12v
Max Power +5v
300w -12v

#6 smurfgod

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 10:18 AM

You might be able to get by with that power supply, maybe. Probably not worth the risk though. Personally, I wouldn't take the chance. I'd get a new power supply. I'd go with something in the 450-500W range if I were you. If that meant I would have to wait on the graphics card then I'd just wait. Cuz really what good is a pretty new card if your system can't handle it?

#7 Goldwyn

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 02:27 PM

May I recommend this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817101033

I know I know. A bit overkill but just think. Not only do you run your computer. but the whole city block
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#8 smurfgod

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 03:38 PM

You'd be able to eat off it too. grab some marshmallows and toast em on the motherboard when that thing sets it on fire.

Do not take his suggestion seriously, it was a joke, i hope.

#9 Goldwyn

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 09:27 PM

Yeah No don't buy that. lol that is way overkill for any Personal Computer. 500 Watt psu is planty of power for an adverage PC

Edited by Goldwyn, 13 October 2008 - 09:28 PM.

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#10 dc3

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 11:25 PM

This card doesn't require an additional power connection, it does draw its power from the AGP bus.


System Requirements

* AGP based PC is required with one 8X lane graphics slot available on the motherboard
* 350-Watt power supply or greater (assumes fully loaded system)
* 512MB of system memory
* Installation software requires CD-ROM drive
* DVD playback requires DVD drive and decoder software (not included)



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#11 Tskales

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 04:14 AM

Sorry for the late reply...

I think it would be a good idea to wait until i have the money to afford these things. After christmas i will have enough for the card, a psu, and enough to get someone to install it all for me.

Thanks for all your help, i have a better understanding now of what i'm dealing with.

#12 Sterling14

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 06:46 PM

You may want to look into putting this all in yourself, especially if you're tight on money. Some computer place is going to rip you off for something that isn't that hard to do. A graphics card just pops into a slot (it really takes maybe a minutes or two to open your computer, and put in a new graphics card). Also, a power supply isn't that hard either. All you do is screw it into the case, and make sure everything is connected. All the connections only go to a certain thing, so you can't really plug the wrong thing in and ruin anything.

If you become interested doing it yourself, we can give you a more detailed explanation how to do it too :thumbsup: !
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#13 dc3

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 08:04 PM

Just to add to what Sterling14 has posted, the card and connectors from the power supply are all keyed, this means that they will only go together the proper way. To reduce some of the possible confusion you can take a piece of masking tape and number each connector from the PSU and the device that it was connected to. Another thing that I would suggest is that before you touch any of the components inside the case you should touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity that you may have generated, I would also suggest that you unplug the computer while you do this. The type of spark that you see when you shuffle across the carpet and then touch the doorknob is more than enough to kill components with integrated circuits, like your motherboard, graphics card, and your RAM. I would also suggest that you unplug the computer while you do this.

The hardest part of this will be trying to figure out how to get the case open. This really isn't that difficult, just new to you.

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#14 hamluis

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 08:10 PM

FWIW:

http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-3118_7-5023982-1.html

http://www.fonerbooks.com/r_power.htm

It takes about a minute to physically install a graphics card, 5 minutes or so to open the case, 5 minutes to close the case.

It takes a bit longer to disconnect the current power supply (only because of attachments) but it's pretty easy. A total of 4 screws must be removed to actually physically remove it from the case.

We are not talking anything life-threatening :thumbsup:.

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#15 garmanma

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 08:52 PM

5 minutes or so to open the case, 5 minutes to close the case.


The side has remained off of mine for about a year now :thumbsup:
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