Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

'd' Drive?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Aussie Ness

Aussie Ness

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Crapsville,NSW,Australia
  • Local time:03:51 PM

Posted 03 October 2008 - 11:51 PM

Hi Everyone!
Recently my hard drive has come close to full so I have been deleting unused programs, files etc. and defragging. I have only gained a small amount of space although it's better than what it was. My decluttering has lead me to question the 'D' Drive. I've never really taken any notice of it before so thought I'd have a look at what it contains. I found some odd logs in there and alot of Incredimail data and other random files. Was quite surprised and can't imagine how they got in there. To be able to read or see these files I had to extract them to the 'C' drive and then open as usual there. I ended up deleting most of them as they were just funny emails etc. I tested it today and dropped an .avi file in there and was able to view it in there. So how the other files ended up there is really strange but leads me to ask....

Why do we have a 'D' drive? Since I'm running out of room on my 'C' drive how can I best utilise it?

Any thoughts or responses would be most appreciated.
Ness

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,802 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:51 PM

Posted 04 October 2008 - 12:10 AM

Is this a partition of the main hdd?

How large is it?

What is the make and model of your computer?

Some manufacturers will add a small partition with recovery information.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 Aussie Ness

Aussie Ness
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Crapsville,NSW,Australia
  • Local time:03:51 PM

Posted 04 October 2008 - 01:07 AM

Hi dc3.......Thank you for responding.

It's an AMD Athlon 64 Processor
3200+
2.01GHz,512 MB RAM

I grabbed this info from my System Tools/System Information/Components/Storage/Drives

Drive C:
Description Local Fixed Disk
Compressed No
File System NTFS
Size 37.27 GB (40,015,953,920 bytes)
Free Space 7.05 GB (7,571,238,912 bytes)
Volume Name
Volume Serial Number 088BD2AE

Drive D:
Description Local Fixed Disk
Compressed No
File System NTFS
Size 111.78 GB (120,023,281,664 bytes)
Free Space 111.67 GB (119,901,978,624 bytes)
Volume Name New Volume
Volume Serial Number C0A16357

and this from Discs

Description Disk drive
Manufacturer (Standard disk drives)
Model ST3160827AS
Bytes/Sector 512
Media Loaded Yes
Media Type Fixed	hard disk media
Partitions 2
SCSI Bus 0
SCSI Logical Unit 0
SCSI Port 2
SCSI Target ID 0
Sectors/Track 63
Size 149.05 GB (160,039,272,960 bytes)
Total Cylinders 19,457
Total Sectors 312,576,705
Total Tracks 4,961,535
Tracks/Cylinder 255
Partition Disk #0, Partition #0
Partition Size 37.27 GB (40,015,954,944 bytes)
Partition Starting Offset 32,256 bytes
Partition Disk #0, Partition #1
Partition Size 111.78 GB (120,023,285,760 bytes)
Partition Starting Offset 40,015,987,200 bytes

and this from the summary....

OS Name Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Version 5.1.2600 Service Pack 3 Build 2600
OS Manufacturer Microsoft Corporation
System Name OFFICEPC
System Manufacturer NVIDIA
System Model AWRDACPI
System Type X86-based PC
Processor x86 Family 15 Model 47 Stepping 0 AuthenticAMD ~2010 Mhz
BIOS Version/Date Award Software International, Inc. F4, 2/05/2005
SMBIOS Version 2.3
Windows Directory C:\WINDOWS
System Directory C:\WINDOWS\system32
Boot Device \Device\HarddiskVolume1
Locale Australia
Hardware Abstraction Layer Version = "5.1.2600.5512 (xpsp.080413-2111)"
User Name OFFICEPC\Ness
Time Zone AUS Eastern Standard Time
Total Physical Memory 1,024.00 MB
Available Physical Memory 56.54 MB
Total Virtual Memory 2.00 GB
Available Virtual Memory 1.96 GB
Page File Space 1.22 GB
Page File C:\pagefile.sys

I'm not sure if its a partition or not. I'm not really familiar with whats under the bonnet..so to speak!
Ness

#4 Guest_Abacus 7_*

Guest_Abacus 7_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 04 October 2008 - 01:24 AM

It is a Partitioned Drive, Mate.

Whoever set it up was using it to store Data on, it is NOT a Recovery Drive and if you don't need the Data there it would be just a Safety to leave it, in case Programs have been installed there to run on C: Drive. Be quit Free to transfer Data there as a Back up to your C: Drive that has reached critical shortage of free Space and I doubt if Defrag would work on C: Drive now.

After you Move Data onto D: from C: do a Defrag to Both Drives? That will make it run a lot better

:thumbsup:

#5 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,802 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.

Posted 04 October 2008 - 01:34 AM

It is becoming a common practice to make two partitions on the hdd now days, a small one for the operating system, and the second for files and application. The advantage of this is that if you need to reinstall the operating system you can do so without having to worry about losing all of your file and downloaded applications.

I would move all of your non-Windows files to the larger partition and leave the small one alone for updates.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 Guest_Abacus 7_*

Guest_Abacus 7_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 04 October 2008 - 01:44 AM

I have a 200G HDD set up into 5 Partitions of around 40G each.

In times of Reinstall Windows, it is a Snap to Transfer Data out of C: Drive to one of the other Drives till the reformate and reinstall is finished.

Just a left over from WIN98SE days, where a reformate and reinstall was a regular thing each few months.

40G is a good size for XP, with other Partition/s set up to take Data Storage. XP will run smoother that way. BTW you can Disable System Restore on your D: Drive it is not needed there

:thumbsup:

#7 Aussie Ness

Aussie Ness
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Crapsville,NSW,Australia
  • Local time:08:51 PM

Posted 04 October 2008 - 02:12 AM

Thanks for your responses.

I'm a bit confused.

Is the 'd' drive just for storage or ...if I understand dc3 correctly I can put programs in there and they will run just fine. Would they still show up in the start menu? For example if I moved my son's games to the 'd' drive would they all still work ok? Or should I just drop programs I rarely use in there...like Photoshop etc.

Also, I think I'm following you on the reformatting advantages. If I was to reformat and reinstall windows I could place programs like Incredimail in there to safely sit it out and then once reformatted I could bring it back in and it would work as if nothing happened?????

Why is the 'd' drive sooooo much larger than the 'c' drive? It should be the other way around!!!

How do I disable system restore on the 'd' drive? (I even killed off all bar the last restore point to try and gain space!)

Muchly appreciated.
Ness

#8 ComputerWhizz7

ComputerWhizz7

  • Members
  • 408 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Zealand

Posted 04 October 2008 - 02:26 AM

Lets put it simple, C: is for your operating system and all your programs etc and D: is for all your data and important files. If C: drive fails and all your Documents etc are on D:, they are unharmed.

Right click on 'My Computer" and go to 'System Restore' select the drive and click 'Settings' then tick the box at the top that should say "Turn off system restore on this drive and click ok.

If you plan to move program files you will need to uninstall the programs and reinstall then placing then in the folder on D: drive because the registry needs to know where they are from installation.

Edited by ComputerWhizz7, 04 October 2008 - 02:29 AM.

I came, I saw, I conquered. - Julius Caeser

#9 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,802 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:03:51 PM

Posted 04 October 2008 - 02:26 AM

I wouldn't worry about disabling the System Restore on the D: drive, System Restore only applies to the Windows operating system, it will have no effect on your other files and applications. I'd just leave it alone.

All of your games, programs (applications), movies, they will all work just fine in the separate partition, and the applications will show up in Windows menu.

The larger partition is the one that you want to put all of the files and applications that don't pertain to the Windows operating system. You should keep the smaller partition for Windows updates and the operating system.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 Guest_Abacus 7_*

Guest_Abacus 7_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 04 October 2008 - 03:31 AM

Lets put it simple, C: is for your operating system and all your programs etc and D: is for all your data and important files. If C: drive fails and all your Documents etc are on D:, they are unharmed.

Right click on 'My Computer" and go to 'System Restore' select the drive and click 'Settings' then tick the box at the top that should say "Turn off system restore on this drive and click ok.

If you plan to move program files you will need to uninstall the programs and reinstall then placing then in the folder on D: drive because the registry needs to know where they are from installation.


Just hang on? When selecting Disable System Restore, just make sure you only select D: Drive to do that, both will be listed! Later we can talk on C: Drive. It can be reduced to Help Manage C: Drive in the Future! Windows freezes a big perchantage of the Drive for System Restore that many people are not aware of.

2nd Point is valid, but firstly move the Folder there on D: Drive, That makes sure the Saved Games are there for your Son? remove it, from C: Drive, than reinstall it using the D: Drive address you moved it to,but if you need to Reformat and reinstall later, although the Programs sit in D: Drive, they will need a reinstall for Windows registry to see them, the same as now?

Just relax, you are doing well so far Mate, just think before you press Buttons?

We are trying not to confuse you, just ask before you do? Each one of us is trying to Help you with what experience we have.

:thumbsup:

Edited by Abacus 7, 04 October 2008 - 03:58 AM.


#11 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,802 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:05:51 PM

Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:03 AM

Windows freezes a big perchantage of the Drive for System Restore that many people are not aware of.


The maximum percentage of storage is 12%. That means on the D: drive she would have 98.3GB left out of the 111.78GB.

There shouldn't be any confusion as to which drive has the operating system on it, when you go to System Restore and click on the System Restore Settings the two partitions will show up as C: and D:. If you highlight the C: drive and click on Settings you will find that the option to close the System restore is not available for that drive, you would have to use the first page to turn off System Restore to all drives. The option to turn off the System Restore is only available to the drive that doesn't have the operating system on it under Settings.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 Guest_Abacus 7_*

Guest_Abacus 7_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:28 AM

I honestly think discussing the Technical Points at this time will just confuse the Member that came here for Help, so if noone minds I will retire.

:thumbsup:

#13 Aussie Ness

Aussie Ness
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 56 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Crapsville,NSW,Australia
  • Local time:08:51 PM

Posted 04 October 2008 - 04:59 PM

Thank you so much for your replies.....I had a look at the System Restore Settings and I completely understand what you have told me. I think since at this point I have so much space on the 'd' drive I won't need to turn it off just yet.

I think I will go through my files via Windows Explorer and see what I can drop in the 'd' drive. Things like video (there's only a couple of little ones) and photos, documents etc. would be easy to to park there. Maybe I should leave program files alone. Does anyone know how I can see what programs use what 'portion of the pie?'

My daughter has Vista on her laptop and is now wondering if she should send her Sims game over to 'd' drive??? If she decides to do that... I understand now that she should uninstall from 'c' and reinstall on 'd'. The downside to that is she would loose all her saved information and settings right?

I really appreciate your help and am sure others will benefit from your collective wisdom too. (or am I the only one that has just now questioned the 'd' drive???)
Ness




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users