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Video Card ( Can It Be Added )


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#1 Kryptonite

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 09:22 AM

I have an HP Pavillion a1616n that does not seem to have a video card that i can recognize as one.
Intel Pentium D 820 XP media, and 1 gig of memory....i know, that's how i got it and will max out before the Video card it that is possible.

It has 3 PCI slots, one with a network hard in it. And one PCI express card slot which is empty.

Where the monitor hooks up it looks like a small rectangular ( cover i'm guessing ) sits right over the motherboard. Is this those shared memory "cards"?

Can i add a mid to high end graphic card to one of the available slots express or regular?

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#2 HitSquad

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 09:46 AM

Hi Kryptonite.
There is no video "card". It uses an on board ATI chipset for graphics. If you look closely at the motherboard, you should see "ATI" on the graphics controller. You can always upgrade to a standard video card but be careful you do not buy one that requires too much power. OEM'S typicly use a low end power supply to cut costs.

As a side note:
If you did not get a recovery disk with your computer, see here on how to create one yourself.
After you have created it, you can create a "Recovery Tools CD" that will allow you to remove the hidden partition on the drive and get that space back.

Edited by HitSquad, 03 October 2008 - 10:02 AM.


#3 Kryptonite

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 09:39 AM

Hey "Big Al" ( like that avatar )

Thanks for the tips.

It's a 300 w power supply.

i'll definitely make a recovery disc.

Any suggestions about the card? i do graphics and a little cad work. If it's not too much drain on the system it would be nice to have a TV tuner or maybe i should look into a separate card for that?

i take it there's no need to disable or remove the ati chip?

#4 hamluis

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 11:25 AM

If you go with a card such as an ATI All in Wonder...the card provides video and video-capture/TV tuner capabilities. In such case, you should disable your onboard video in the BIOS.

OTOH...it's probably considerably cheaper to use your onboard video chip...and add a TV-tuner card for its capabilities.

I guess I have to ask...what do you think adding a video card...will provide...that you don't already have?

And, FWIW, I'd definitely get a better PSU if I anticipated adding anything to the system.

Worth reading, IMO: http://static.tigerdirect.com/html/powersuppliesGuide.html

Louis

#5 Kryptonite

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 04:22 AM

If you go with a card such as an ATI All in Wonder...the card provides video and video-capture/TV tuner capabilities. In such case, you should disable your onboard video in the BIOS.

OTOH...it's probably considerably cheaper to use your onboard video chip...and add a TV-tuner card for its capabilities.

I guess I have to ask...what do you think adding a video card...will provide...that you don't already have?

And, FWIW, I'd definitely get a better PSU if I anticipated adding anything to the system.

Worth reading, IMO: http://static.tigerdirect.com/html/powersuppliesGuide.html

Louis


Louis,

I do video and photo editing and have a home design program that uses either a CAD or CAD like program that a friend of mine who has the same program claims imporoves in performance with a graphics card with it's own dedicated memory.

I will read the link you provided....noticing that "tigerdirect.com" is part of the link name it occures to me that i saw a tirgerdirect store near by in the my new state.

A question about disabling the on board video in my bios. Wouldn't i need to "see" my bios in order to disable it? And if i disable it before i install the new card will the new card automatically enable the video monitor to either enable or change to the new settings?

Thanks

#6 hamluis

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 12:35 PM

How to get into your computer's BIOS - http://www.cyberwalker.net/faqs/reinstall-...enter-BIOS.html

Regarding onboard and the BIOS...as I recall (from when I installed my AIW 9600 and disabled my onboard, the system will load initially drivers which provide minimum visual functionality (you may not be able to change the resolution and the res might be at 800 x 600).

I use nothing but onboard video these days because I no longer use my AIW card for capture, having gone to a Hauppauge capture card (that doesn't have the driver problems that ATI cards can become infamous for).

Once the system has booted into Windows, it will either load the drivers for your installed card (if such are already in the driver's cache of XP) or it will reflect the fact that it has discovered new hardware which needs drivers in order to work properly. If drivers are not installed automatically by XP, at this point you would install the drivers for your video card by running the CD that has the drivers.

I cannot refute or validate the claims that graphics card memory allows certain types of programs to function better.

But I do know that Photoshop and all other graphics- or video-editing programs do perform better if the user has ample system memory, as well as defragged hard drive space. I would check it out at the software website and/or forums for same because other users of these programs (and developers) are quick to pass on tips to other users that make for a more enjoyable computing experience.

http://www.cadtutor.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1804

http://forums.cnet.com/5208-6142_102-0.htm...ssageID=2738776

Lots more opinions at http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=W...mp;aq=f&oq=

Louis

#7 Kryptonite

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 04:50 AM

Louis,

Thanks for the links, tips, and ideas...

Going away for a few days or so to a wedding ( i'm already late in leaving fixing my old Toyota PU which is so unique that everything is a wait to get parts...it seems to be ready but i'm taking a tool kit and bandaids just in case ) when i get back it's computer crunch time...gotta get everything up and running....if i put as much time into the computers that i put into my truck i could have built HAL. HA!




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