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Cpu Theory Question


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#1 smurfgod

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 05:21 AM

Sorry if its the wrong forum, didn't know where to put it. Thought about General Chat but I don't know if the people with the answers I need go there. Tried googling but its all powerpoint and i don't have M$ office.

I'm watching the CBT nuggets on A+ and the teacher had a drawing up there of the internal workings of the CPU and I want to make sure I understand it correctly. He was a little confusing on this point. He said all modern CPUs have 2 ALUs and 2 registers where the data comes in/out of the FSB and is split between them by the control. But he's showing this on a dual core computer.
If I'm understanding it right, the data comes in from the FSB, hits the control(ler?), the control decides this half to one ALU/register, and the other half to the other ALU/register combo. They each do their thing and push it back into the control who ships it off to whatever component needs the data. Is that correct or no?

And a single core Pentium 3/4 has 2 ALU/registers? So a Dual-core/core2duo has 4 ALU/registers on the chip? Then a quad core would have 8? And just in case, if you know when they started using 2 ALU/registers (the pentium/amd generation) that information would be appreciated also.

I appreciate your time spent reading this. And I don't want to sound rude, but only answer questions that you are sure of the answer on. Misinformation would do more harm than good, this test is expensive for me and I don't intend to fail.

Also Mark, or any other mods that happen to read this, I am liable to have a few questions like this as I'm studying. If there is somewhere else you would like me to ask them, don't hesitate to tell me.

Edited by smurfgod, 29 September 2008 - 05:26 AM.


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#2 M...

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 08:57 AM

Hello smurfgod,

Regarding the PowerPoint presentations you have been unable to view, you can download the free PowerPoint Viewer from Microsoft. The viewer allows you to view PowerPoint presentations even though you don't have the full PowerPoint program installed on your computer.

"PowerPoint Viewer 2007":

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;displaylang=en

#3 smurfgod

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 09:15 AM

Thank you. Didn't know about that.

#4 hamluis

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 09:40 AM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arithmetic_logic_unit

There seems to be a ton of info when I Google using "ALU" as the search string.

Louis

#5 xXAlphaXx

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 12:22 PM

smurfgod,

That sounds pretty accurate but who's to say what is a "modern" standard? I consider A duo-core processor standard at the time.

With my understanding of a processors ALU, the ALU is engineered to do whatever operations it is programed to do (Math, Bit-Shifting operations etc.) When the data comes in as FSB and it is split by the control to the register and the ALU, and push it out to the component that requires the data that counts as a single core.

Correct me if I am wrong. I am studying into processor engineering ( Gotta beat Intel ;D ) but its a lot of info and their is a lot I don't get either.

Edited by xXAlphaXx, 01 October 2008 - 12:26 PM.

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