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No Signal


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5 replies to this topic

#1 QwertyKey

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 06:03 PM

I am building a new computer, and when I boot it up (this being the first time) I get this no signal error desplayed on the monitor. I was told this was because I had a bad motherboard, so I sent it back and got a new one, but I still get the exact same error. I also checked the psu, and the video card, and those each work fine, so it's not an issue with those. So I really don't know what's wrong with the computer.

This is my motherboard: http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=X48TurboTwins and manual: http://download.asrock.com/manual/X48TurboTwins.pdf

If anyone can help me, I can get onto IRC as well. Thanks :thumbsup:

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 06:32 PM

When I had a similar situation...I had bent CPU pins.

Louis

#3 QwertyKey

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 07:21 PM

CPU pins are good... (for this one the pins are actually on the motherboard.

#4 Sterling14

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 09:37 PM

Take the motherboard, and everything out of the case and put it on a cardboard box. Only put the bare minimums in, such as one stick of ram, processor, heatsink, and video card. Make sure all your power supply connections are connected properly. To turn the computer on, you can use a screwdriver and touch it to the two pins on the motherboard that you connect the power switch cables for the case.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#5 QwertyKey

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 11:39 PM

Errr... let me take that back...

I'll try it tomorrow. It works without HD and OD?

Edited by QwertyKey, 27 September 2008 - 11:40 PM.


#6 Platypus

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Posted 28 September 2008 - 07:30 AM

If you haven't already, make sure the CMOS clear jumper isn't shipped in the CLR position, and try clearing the CMOS memory anyway, in case a static zap or similar may have corrupted data and set up an unbootable state.

It works without HD and OD?

Yes it does. Doing as Sterling has suggested makes sure nothing is shorting to the metal case, and if all the parts are OK, the system should start up, do the POST check and complain that it can't find an operating system. If it does this, look for a reason why it didn't work in the case eg, a metal pillar where it shouldn't be underneath the board, an earthing finger from the I/O cutout plate touching a lead etc.

If you still get nothing, you can try to start it up with no video card or memory fitted. There will need to be a little onboard speaker/beeper (from the picture there doesn't seem to be one), or the case speaker plugged onto the SPKR pins on the motherboard. With no memory, the board should beep insistently. If not, you're left with PSU, motherboard or CPU (fit or fault) as the cause.

If you get beeps, turn off and fit memory alone, the beep code should change to that particular board's "no video" code - if it stops working, you have faulty memory. Try one DIMM at a time. (Remember memory must be changed with the power off at the mains, there is still power on the memory in standby and changing it then can damage it.)

By process of elimination, you should be able to find the cause of the problem.

Edited by Platypus, 28 September 2008 - 07:33 AM.

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