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Installing Ubuntu


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#1 Chris_com28

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 12:28 PM

Someone told me of a Linux version called Ubuntu. It's apparently easier to use than the other versions and sounds like a good thing to try out. Though I've never installed a Linux program before, let alone have it run along side my Windows XP (which is what I plan to do) so I'll need some help. Apparently I should do a back up before I do this. I'm also not sure about how to go about partitioning my drive for Ubuntu. Should I revise partitioning before I think about installing or would it be irrelevant to what I want to do?

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#2 smurfgod

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 01:07 PM

A backup might not be such a bad idea. You also want to defrag your HDD beforehand. As far as repartitioning, I would let Ubuntu handle that, its better at basically everything than windows is and that's no exception. You should shop around before deciding on a distro though. There's a sticky at the top of this board with a lot of different distributions. You should DL and burn a live cd (it boots and runs off your cdrom without changing things) so you can see if the chosen one(s) is really what you want.

You can also install linux inside windows, so that it loads like a regular program, with something called wubi. Wasn't for me but its something you could look into. At any rate, good luck, and welcome to Linux.

#3 cryptodan

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 01:26 PM

Its best to always use a LiveCD to see if you actually like using linux and to get yourself familiar with the commands.

#4 Chris_com28

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 01:35 PM

I'm going to respond to this properly when tomarow, though something caught my eye. You mentioned using a live CD. So basically I download Ubuntu onto a CD and use that to access the OS? I never thought about that. Ages ago my father mentioned being able to hold a Linux OS on a floppy disc. That shouldn't be to hard. I'll see about doing that tomarow.

Thanks

#5 cryptodan

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 01:50 PM

I'm going to respond to this properly when tomarow, though something caught my eye. You mentioned using a live CD. So basically I download Ubuntu onto a CD and use that to access the OS? I never thought about that. Ages ago my father mentioned being able to hold a Linux OS on a floppy disc. That shouldn't be to hard. I'll see about doing that tomarow.

Thanks


Pick Your Poison aka Linux LiveCD

#6 Chris_com28

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 07:51 AM

I've looked up Live CD creation and was confused. I guess with this I just download it and install and select the CD as the directory. I'll try that today sometime.

#7 cryptodan

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:15 AM

I've looked up Live CD creation and was confused. I guess with this I just download it and install and select the CD as the directory. I'll try that today sometime.


No, you download the LiveCD, and just leave it in your CD-ROM drive when you want to use Linux and it will run off the CD Drive and your RAM. Nothing has to be installed.

#8 smurfgod

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 10:46 AM

yea, Just make sure when you burn it, you burn it as an image. IMGburn does it well, and its freeware. Also keep in mind that you will see all the things you can do, but it will run slower off the cd than when its actually installed. Decompressing on the fly. Good luck to ya

#9 Chris_com28

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:46 AM

Thanks. I told my father what I was trying to do and he burned the image onto the CD for me. Can't remember what software he used, but he gave me a copy of both the image burner and the live CD. Though I haven't got round to using it much. Last time I was pretty confused and just spent some time seeing what software was on it.

There should probably be a guide for people trying to get used to Linux. I'm still confused about how you can't defragment the hard drive or go to the control pannel. This reminds me of a quote a read in a book somewhere about it being easier to teach someone quantum physics who has never been educated in classical physics compared to someone educated in classical physics. I'm so used to Windows I don't think I'll ever be able to make the switch.

#10 cryptodan

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 11:19 AM

Thanks. I told my father what I was trying to do and he burned the image onto the CD for me. Can't remember what software he used, but he gave me a copy of both the image burner and the live CD. Though I haven't got round to using it much. Last time I was pretty confused and just spent some time seeing what software was on it.

There should probably be a guide for people trying to get used to Linux. I'm still confused about how you can't defragment the hard drive or go to the control pannel. This reminds me of a quote a read in a book somewhere about it being easier to teach someone quantum physics who has never been educated in classical physics compared to someone educated in classical physics. I'm so used to Windows I don't think I'll ever be able to make the switch.


Right here: Rute.PDF

#11 czhang

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 05:54 AM

I strongly recommend that you NOT install Ubuntu (Now 8.10) on the same hard drive as XP. Ubuntu will add a GRUB bootloader to load both XP and Ubuntu without any problem. However, Windows XP updates could mess up the GRUB bootloader. I had this happened to me just a couple of weeks ago.

My suggestion: Install Ubuntu on an isolated hard drive first. Then you can connect both XP and Ubuntu hard drives to the motherboard, and use the BIOS setup to choose which of the hard drives you want to boot into.

I have been trying out Ubuntu 8.10 64 bit for the past few weeks. If you are only using your computer for web browsing, e-mail, and common office work (word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation), Ubuntu is definitely not a bad choice. But if you would also like to watch DVD movies and write your own programs etc., then Ubuntu is perhaps not for you. The DVD playback using the movie player in Ubuntu, after downloading certain Codec, is grainy and somewhat jerky. There is also a steep learning curve to program in Ubuntu (/Kubuntu).

#12 cryptodan

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 09:29 AM

You can write your own programs in Linux/Unix just like you can in Windows. You can even write windows programs in linux, but you will need the windows libraries and header files.

Your DVD Playback is probably grainy due to your video card or some other weird configuration error.

You can try Ubuntu using a LiveCD.

#13 czhang

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 10:36 AM

My video card is 512 MB NVidia 8600 GT. I have installed the video driver recommended by Ubuntu developers (? I have two choices: ...173 and ...177, and ...177 was recommended) and have activated the driver. However, this has not solved the problem. I got some information about the driver being a proprietary driver. I don't know if this is the problem.

Edited by czhang, 31 January 2009 - 10:37 AM.


#14 cryptodan

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 03:17 PM

You may want to try to install the driver from nVidia's website.

#15 czhang

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 08:54 PM

I have download the driver: NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-180.22-pkg2.run from NVidia site http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux_display_amd64_180.22.html.

However, I have some trouble installing it. I double clicked the downloaded file, it would run in a terminal but only to inform me that it had to be run from the root. I browsed to the root, and try to copy and paste and downloaded file into it, but the system would not let me do that.

On the NVidia site, it suggested to use the following command to install:
sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-180.22-pkg2.run
I tried it in a terminal, but was informed that the system couldn't open NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-180.22-pkg2.run.

Any detailed instructions about how I can install the NVidia driver will be greatly appreciated.




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