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Memory?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Mol_Bolom

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 10:13 PM

Hello...

I am wanting to learn about the more hard core aspects of programming, and would like to start with device drivers and memory...

Is there anywhere online that a person could learn about how to access, read, write, etc all parts of the computer hardware?

I would like to know how the OS as well as programs and device drivers utilize memory, video memory, video, sound cards, etc....

Thanks...

Edited by Mol_Bolom, 14 September 2008 - 10:14 PM.


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#2 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 05:23 AM

Do you know C? C is the only major programming language (other than assembler) that gets you real used to dealing with raw memmory structures.

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#3 Mol_Bolom

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 10:18 AM

Unfortunately no, but I'll get started on learning about it...

Thanks...

#4 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 11:27 AM

i've done assembler and c. i learned c first, but i would recommend assembler first. i was a decent c programmer, but there are many things about c that make more sense to me after learning assembler. in assembler you can watch the machine code, and the assembler code ( everything is separted into 2 bits in my compiler) and you can really see how the cpu is addressing memory locations and which ports are open and when. it makes c easier to wrap your head around
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

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#5 Mol_Bolom

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 03:38 PM

Thanks Ryan...
I hadn't thought of assembly. I think it can be called, also, in about any language, so I could use it with Pascal or even Basic rather than having to learn C, and also it might be more useful, too...I've seen it implemented in many different ways in those languages, but never really learned it...

By the way, I have a very very old book on asm...Peter Norton's Assembly Language Book for the IBM PC...1986...

I don't know about assembly, but I know old tutorials and lessons don't work with newer programs. An example would be Atari basic verses RQBasic, Visual Basic, etc. Although they are fairly similar they are quite different. So is asm the same way or would this book still be able to be used?

#6 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 16 September 2008 - 11:39 AM

it may have its uses, but a lot has changed since then. hardware architecture has changed a lot. u can probably find some really good online tutorials. though ive not tried.

if you're looking for an actual hard copy though, i would just check local bookstores for one.

if you're near a college campus, they have great material and best of all, you can purchase used, saves A LOT. also, like at my shcool IUPUI, they have lab manuals that are written by the professors. most of these are about 15 bux and in a spiral notebook. They provide progressively tougher and more complex real life scenario problems for you to test your aptitude. If you're really wanting to get into this stuff
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#7 Mol_Bolom

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 03:00 PM

Thanks Ryan...

After thinking about it though, I decided to go ahead and try learning C...Which doesn't seem so difficult now.

But I am running into a few curious problems. I downloaded Codeblocks on my Win Vista and compiled several tutorial test programs and they ran just fine, however, when I tried to do it on my computer that has Vector Linux installed the #include doesn't seem to want to find the iostream file. I know it's there, it's in an include sub directory, which is odd, I've heard that I wouldn't need to add the entire directory information as long as an include file was within the directories. Not to mention that I have compiled programs using stdio.h which is in the main include directory...Eh, just confusing...

#8 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 08:27 AM

Thanks Ryan...

After thinking about it though, I decided to go ahead and try learning C...Which doesn't seem so difficult now.

But I am running into a few curious problems. I downloaded Codeblocks on my Win Vista and compiled several tutorial test programs and they ran just fine, however, when I tried to do it on my computer that has Vector Linux installed the #include doesn't seem to want to find the iostream file. I know it's there, it's in an include sub directory, which is odd, I've heard that I wouldn't need to add the entire directory information as long as an include file was within the directories. Not to mention that I have compiled programs using stdio.h which is in the main include directory...Eh, just confusing...



i'm not sure i can help much there. i've only done C using visual studios, and i never had any problems with the libraries or the standard input/output. yeah, learning c would be good though. assembly language just helps you get a feel for the hardware, but not necessary at all.
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#9 Mol_Bolom

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 01:19 PM

Thanks Ryan...

I had purchased another computer and have been busy getting it up and running for the past several days.
I did get it to compile finally, but unfortunately I don't remember what I did. If it was like Zenwalk Linux (which was the only distro that would run decent on the new computer), the problem was I didn't save the file with the extension cpp. Looks like the extension is quite important in Linux programming verses windows programming...




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