Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

What Is Bandwidth?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Lucidolph

Lucidolph

  • Members
  • 90 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:13 PM

Posted 07 September 2008 - 01:44 PM

Ok... I have a bandwidth monitor, this is because I have a fair usage policy with my ISP which is 30G a month, I usually go over this so I got 'Bandwidth Monitor Pro'

1... I access my Brother's PC via the crossover cable, the BWM shows a 5MB/sec speed, obviously this doesn't count as 'Downloads' so it's just messing with my results on BandWithMonitor.

2... If I play a game like CounterStrike: Source / WOW or anything online, It's constantly got a reading of downloading, and after a session of CSS it read that I'd downloaded 300Mb, so... Is that downloading? THere were no file downloads, just playing the game...
I simply want to know that If i play WOW for a month i dont want to have complaints about downloading too much if you know what I mean.

3... If this bandwidth and downloads are different, then that's great, and I'd like to find a different program that only shows my downloads... Because I know i didn't download 10G in 1 day =/

Thankyou!

Isaac

[Moderator edit: moved post to a more appropriate forum and expanded Topic Description. jgw]

Edited by jgweed, 08 September 2008 - 08:43 AM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 nixgod

nixgod

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:13 PM

Posted 08 September 2008 - 01:48 PM

If you are getting 30Gb of bandwidth a month then anything you do will eat into that. playing a game online. surfing. watching a video online and download files will all count towards that cap

doea your brothers pc connect online also. anything he does will effect that amount too

Edited by nixgod, 08 September 2008 - 01:52 PM.


#3 MattV

MattV

  • Members
  • 736 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Asheville NC
  • Local time:11:13 PM

Posted 08 September 2008 - 11:31 PM

I would like to know what moron thought that bandwidth, which is radio terminology, would be a good term to use in describing data transmission speeds.

#4 rowal5555

rowal5555

    Just enough info to be armed & dangerous...


  • Members
  • 2,644 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Kilda, Dunedin. South Island. NZ
  • Local time:03:13 PM

Posted 09 September 2008 - 02:34 AM

Hi Isaac

Your ISP should be able to supply you with uptodate info. Check their webpage for an easy to access tool. I have mine in Favourites and it is only a few seconds to check on current total use at any time.

I have quite a few computers connected to my account via wireless and insist that each has BITMETER II installed to record all movement through each one. You may have a bit of a different situation by connecting to your brother, but if that use is not going up and down the main line, it won't be recorded by your ISP.

Cheers

rowal5555 (Rob )                                                             

Avid supporter of Bleeping Computer's
Team 38444

You can help find a cure


 


#5 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,957 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:12:13 PM

Posted 09 September 2008 - 04:33 AM

Bandwidth is appropriate terminology for data transfer. In telecommunications it relates to radio, television, cable telephony or optical signalling, and the information transmitted by these means can be either analog or digital.

Bandwidth is measured in events per unit time. The bandwidth of a telephone line for example is measured in KHz (thousands of cycles per second), the bandwidth for digital data transmission is measured in Kbps (thousands of bits per second).

The available bandwidth determines how much information can be transmitted. The analog copper pair phone line can transmit one duplex voice conversation, or 56Kbps of data on dial-up, much more using ADSL. The medium's bandwidth property that defines analog performance is just as appropriately applied to digital data.

Likewise for a user's monthly download allocation. 30GB per month (240Gigabits per month) can be called the account monthly bandwidth (albeit an artificially imposed one).

Lucidolph, as nixgod has said, anything that passes from the internet to your computer is download, anything passing from your computer to a destination on the internet is upload. So anything you see, like webpages, graphics, hear like music, or use like games, if it wasn't already on your computer when you started, it's a download and uses up your download allocation.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#6 MattV

MattV

  • Members
  • 736 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Asheville NC
  • Local time:11:13 PM

Posted 09 September 2008 - 06:43 AM

Bandwidth refers to the number of cycles to each side of a radio frequency in which a signal of that frequency would still be able to be tuned in. If, for instance, a 20 kHz signal could be received between 19500 kHz and 20500kHz, then that particular transmitter would be said to have a bandwidth of 1000Hz. (And some of this was dependent on the receiver, as well. Wide-band radio is used mainly for commercial purpose, while narrow-band communications are generally used by the police, military, emergency services, and aircraft.

That explanation is as clear as mud, but I am severely caffeine-deficient right now.

This:

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/audio/sumdif.html

is better.

Edited by MattV, 09 September 2008 - 06:53 AM.


#7 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,957 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:12:13 PM

Posted 09 September 2008 - 09:28 AM

Bandwidth applies to radio, but also to any other means of telecommunication that requires bandwidth in order to function. It doesn't inherently "belong" to radio.

The available bandwidth determines the information content that can be transmitted across any communication channel.

The bitrate capacity of a communications channel is reasonably referred to as bandwidth due to the intimate relationship between it and the analog bandwidth of the channel, as observed by Nyquist, Hartley & others. I doubt if they and others who developed the concept of digital bandwidth were morons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth_(computing)

"Hartley's law is sometimes quoted as just a proportionality between the analog bandwidth, B, in Hertz and what today is called the digital bandwidth, R, in bit/s."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shannon%E2%80%93Hartley_theorem

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users