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Seagate Ext Hd


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#1 manicd

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 01:54 PM

Hi,

I have a question about an external hard drive Ive just purchased.

On my computer I have a partioned Hard Drive (C:/ & D:/), where D:/ is used for backups so if my computer gets a virus I can restore the computer to the state in which I backed it up.
My question is can ACER's e-recover back up utility/application currently installed on my C:/ Drive be installed on my ext HD to serve the same purpose as mentioned above?

Or is there a better way of safegaurding the ext HD?


Kind Regards,



Manic D

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 02:41 PM

There's a better way :thumbsup:.

Interesting read: http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:l6p8Hk...;cd=9&gl=us

I have no idea what Acer's software solution is...but I can almost guarantee that using something like Acronis True Image would result in a better, more reliable backup of your system.

Regarding the idea of backing up all files on a system (continuously)...you probably ought to give that some thought. I guess a good strategy depends on what you have on your system, availability of hard drive space, etc.

I have about 11/12 hard drives lying around my apartment, with two systems to use them. I use 4/5 strictly for holding my copies of movies, music, graphics, documents...which I know that I will always retain. I do not back these up routinely to anything, I just leave them on my storage drives.

When I back up, I mainly only backup the boot partition which contains XP, programs installed, the registry, and a few other odds and ends. My emails aren't even kept on my C: partition because I don't want to take the chance of losing them if something goes wrong with the O/S or the file system or the hard drive.

In any case, I suggest you give it some thought...and then execute your strategy.

Louis

#3 manicd

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 04:08 PM

Hi and thanks for the reply.

I think my question actually extends beyond the ext hard drive i have just bought and more to do with My Computer's Hard Drive its partitions and recovery functions which I have never fully understood.
If there is anyone who could take the time to help me understand the questions I have about this I would be most grateful.

#4 hamluis

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 05:29 PM

Google is your friend...only if you dare to use it :thumbsup:.

Louis

#5 manicd

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 05:10 AM

Thanks for your continued support Hamluis.

I have used google to search for topics I need answers to, but Im still none the wiser.

#6 hamluis

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 10:32 AM

OK...what is it that you want to know...exactly, please?

As many questions as possible...I will try to answer or point you to answers.

Louis

#7 manicd

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 03:40 PM

Hi hamluis and sorry for the late reply


What I want to know is if I can Partition my ext HD in two and have one side for storing files and installing programs and the other side to store back ups.

So for instance lets just say one side is labeled A and the other side B.
For side A I would install programs and store files & side B would store the snapshot or backup of whatever is on A

Can this be done & how?


Best Regards,



Manic D

Edited by manicd, 10 September 2008 - 03:42 PM.


#8 hamluis

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 05:16 PM

OK :thumbsup:.

You can partition a hard drive...for storage...any number of times. You can have as many partitions as you like, within reason. The only thing tricky about partitioning is determining how many partitions and what size.

If this is done before using the drive, it's no problem. If it's wanted after the drive has been used at all...it becomes more complex because XP does not support changing partition sizes after the initial decision.

There are a ton of programs that overcome this pebble and which allow users to partition and change partition sizes (safely) after the hard drive/disk has been used. I use Partition Magic, there are other programs for this.

What you outlined sounded good until you mentioned installing programs on an external drive. In my opinion, to want to do such is inviting disaster. Windows is able to interact/execute programs better/faster...if they are near, not on another partition/drive, IMO. Additionally, the fact that you want to separate the O/S and programs...doubles your chances of having something go wrong in the interaction. I don't think that's a good idea at all, but you are entitled to think otherwise.

I would have the same view even if you wanted to put programs on a separate partition on an internal drive...the external drive just would be slower than an internal. I like Windows and programs together, others have different opinions.

OTOH, I put all data files on partitions that are not my C: partition, there's no reason for them to be there, other than the handful of files which are temporarily in My Documents until I decide to move them somewhere else.

Now, this backup you aluded to...exactly what software or strategy are you going to use to obtain it? I use a disk-imaging program (one of the parents of today's Symantec Ghost), but that's my preference...it's not the only way.

System backups can be quite large...depending on what files are included, how often, etc. If it were me, I'd probably use that external drive for system backups and data files of all sorts, not necessarily creating multiple partitions (because I use folders in the same manner that many use partitions).

Others may differ :huh:.

Louis

#9 manicd

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 12:52 PM

Hi hamluis


OK :thumbsup:.

You can partition a hard drive...for storage...any number of times. You can have as many partitions as you like, within reason. The only thing tricky about partitioning is determining how many partitions and what size.

If this is done before using the drive, it's no problem. If it's wanted after the drive has been used at all...it becomes more complex because XP does not support changing partition sizes after the initial decision.

There are a ton of programs that overcome this pebble and which allow users to partition and change partition sizes (safely) after the hard drive/disk has been used. I use Partition Magic, there are other programs for this.


Yeah I did put some files on the ext HD when I first got it but then I took them of and reformatted. Will this be a problem when I decide on what to do ?

Now, this backup you eluded to...exactly what software or strategy are you going to use to obtain it? I use a disk-imaging program (one of the parents of today's Symantec Ghost), but that's my preference...it's not the only way.


I have a copy of Acronis True Image so I was thinking of using that to do the necessary backups.

Systems backups can be quite large...depending on what files are included, how often, etc. If it were me, I'd probably use that external drive for system backups and data files of all sorts, not necessarily creating multiple partitions (because I use folders in the same manner that many use partitions).


Yeah I could do that but I already have my D:/ Drive for that. What I really wanted to do was install programs on it.
I have 700GB free space on the ext HD and fast running out of space on my internal Drives.

Thanks for all the great information so far

#10 hamluis

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 03:38 PM

<<Yeah I did put some files on the ext HD when I first got it but then I took them of and reformatted. Will this be a problem when I decide on what to do ?>>

No, not at all. An empty hard drive is a good hard drive when it comes to installing Windows :thumbsup:.

<<I have a copy of Acronis True Image so I was thinking of using that to do the necessary backups.>>

Good choice, IMO. It's what I would use if my older software did not do the job.

<<Yeah I could do that but I already have my D:/ Drive for that. What I really wanted to do was install programs on it.
I have 700GB free space on the ext HD and fast running out of space on my internal Drives.>>

Honestly speaking...external hard drives are truly used best when storing only data files (video, audio, graphics, etc.) on them. They are not designed to install programs on, but to relieve some of the pressure from internal hard drives which have run out of space or are headed in that direction.

I'm sure that you know how to move files from the C: to any other drive...I'd suggest doing that for anything other than programs, Windows, and a few other necessary files. You can even move your email repository to another drive with ease so that emails don't reside on the C: partition.

Louis

#11 manicd

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 06:02 PM

Hi hamluis


Thank you for all of the information and advice you have provided me with.

#12 hamluis

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Posted 13 September 2008 - 10:53 AM

Easily done, happy computing :thumbsup:.

Louis

#13 manicd

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 03:39 PM

Hi Hamluis are you still around?

I have some more questions if you are willing to help me answer them?

#14 hamluis

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 06:16 PM

Fire away :thumbsup:.

For control/review purposes...it might be easier if you just start a new thread if the topic is different than what we have discussed so far. It's easier on eyes/mind of readers/members too.

Louis

#15 manicd

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 03:45 AM

Hi Louis

Ive started a new topic here for you here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/169374/hd-questions-part-ii/


Kind Regards,


Dan




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