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How Bad Is Vista


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6 replies to this topic

#1 haun

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 09:29 AM

Ok so I'm having some mixed feelings about some techy stuff. And it sorta boils down to vista.

So Ive heard nothing but crap about vista, its to slow, it crashes, it bla, bla, bla, bla, bla.

But then i saw an ad on some site to The Mojave Experiment.
Go check out the site, but what they did was interview a huge number of people with hidden cameras. They asked them to rate vista (most where 0-5) and then they showed them the preview of new Windows Mojave. They let them play around with it and then asked them to rate it (most where 7-10) and then confessed that Windows Mojave was actually Vista.

So now im in a crunch. I need to actually work with a Vista computer and figure it out before i can kill it.

Any insight?
Annnnd you're, asking, me...

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#2 SLIX

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:23 AM

Hi Haun

I have two PCs, one with XP and the other with Vista.
For me It's early days yet with Vista but so far I have managed to resolve all the issues I've encountered and am slowly moving across to it.
Hardware wise, you will see a slowdown if you are upgrading on the same PC. I build a new PC with a 5.6GHz processor, 4GB of RAM and a 512MB DDR Graphic Card. These are more than enough to run the Aero interface.
The biggest pain for me has been the UAC (User Account Control) which keeps asking if you really want to do something and then wants you to confirm when you say you do. You can turn this off, but if you do, the security centre will start nagging you.
There are registry tweeks around to sort out much of this (unless you have Vista Ultimate where you can set group policies). As is usual with Microsoft, many applications and functions are renamed and moved from where you would expect them. I think we all have a resistance to change. I remember what I felt like when I upgraded to XP from W98SE.
I know people moan about Vista but I don't think it is as bad as its been made out to be.
If you decide to wait for the next version of Windows, bear in mind that it might just be even worse than peoples perception of Vista.

Hope this helps
Steve

#3 haun

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 11:29 AM

okey dokey! Thanks!
Annnnd you're, asking, me...

#4 Guest_BlackBurst_*

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 12:30 PM

It really depends on what you use your computer for. If all you do is browse the web and do email and maybe some word processing, then Vista is probably just fine.
If for example you want to do video or audio editing/recording or possibly gaming, then XP is a better performance and configuration choice. It's documented and benchmarked fact.

Theoretically Vista might be better for networked office computers since it has heightened security. But I don't know for sure. I'd ask a network administrator about that one.

I have an old XP computer and a new Vista computer. The XP computer was configured and running smoothly in a few weeks. The Vista computer was configured and running OK but with some complaints after months of tweaking and research. Both operating systems are new to me since I previously used Windows 98 SE up to recent times. I use both of my computers for audio editing and recording.

I too saw that study done with Mojave, but personally I think it's used just to promote Vista by Microsoft and avoid discussion of Vista's actual flaws.

Edited by BlackBurst, 01 September 2008 - 12:31 PM.


#5 dbough

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 12:35 PM

In response to SLIX issue with the security center - you can turn this off through services. Run 'services.msc' and shut id down from there. Allong with shutting off the Windows firewall, this is the first thing I do on a new build.

For haun - I'd recommend setting up a sandbox for Vista. Unfortunately, for all of us, XP is gonig to stop being supported next year. We will be semi-forced to go to Vista. In response to this, I've set up a VMWare Vista box to toy with and break / fix before I actually HAVE to do it. My main job function is to t/s Cisco networks, but - at times - I also have to support our internal users with theyr PEBCAK problems - and Vista is going to cause a lot of them.

You can find many copies of Vista floating around out there to toy with. M$ gives you 30 days before you have to activate, so that should give you enough time to figure out if you like it or not.
Everything has a beginning and an end. Life is just a cycle of starts and stops. There are ends we don't desire, but they're inevitable, we have to face them. It's what being human is all about. -Jet Black; Cowboy Bebop

-CCVP

Well, Technically ...

#6 haun

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 01:36 PM

Well i use it more for Gaming than anything else. i also do small 3d and programming stuff.

The computer im looking at is an alienware if that helps

Edited by haun, 01 September 2008 - 01:36 PM.

Annnnd you're, asking, me...

#7 KikassAssassin

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 01:44 AM

I've been using Vista (64-bit Home Premium) for awhile, and I've been happy with it. It does do a few things differently than XP, but once you get used to the slightly different ways of doing things, it's just as easy to use. I've had no stability issues whatsoever, and the only compatibility issue I've had is an old Konica Minolta Magicolor printer that doesn't have 64-bit drivers (it works with the 32-bit version of Vista, but not the 64-bit version. That's Konica Minolta's fault for being lazy at making drivers, though, not Microsoft's).

I would recommend against disabling UAC, because once you get used to the popups, they aren't as annoying as a lot of people make them out to be, and UAC is honestly one of the best things Microsoft has done with Vista. It helps make Vista a LOT more secure than XP was (defaulting to an administrator account with elevated privileges is the stupidest thing about previous versions of Windows, and the primary reason viruses and malware have run so rampant across the internet). If you actually pay attention to the UAC popups, you can prevent pretty much anything from running on your PC that you don't want to. It even detects and can stop rootkits from installing if you're paying attention, which is something no anti-virus software can do with nearly as much success.

Just make sure you have enough RAM memory in your PC (2GB is recommended) and Vista will perform just fine. The difference in performance between XP and Vista isn't very big, and I think it's an issue that's blown out of proportion, unless you're using a REALLY low-end PC.




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