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Pc Power Up Problems


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#1 Armed101

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 12:48 PM

Hi All!!! Hopefully someone can help me with this... I have a GT4022 Gateway PC and when I push the button on the front there is supposed to be a blue led come on and then the pc should start right up.... When I do this now the PC almost always doesnt want to come on... Last night i was frustrated so i left it alone and went to bed woke up and turned it on and it started right up.... What is going on here? When I push the button to turn it off I hold it down and it goes off... When I turn it on no blue led just a flashing orange led... The PC sounds like it wants to turn on, ie. the fans turn on a harddrive ect.. but nothing comes on the screen... Please Help!!!

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#2 reelkill

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 01:02 PM

Did you have the computer case opened up before this happened?
10101010101010101010100001001100010100001000010010100110101

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#3 garmanma

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 01:27 PM

Number one suspect would be a power supply. How handy are you?

Caution: There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges your body may have stored before touching any of the components inside. As a safety precaution you should unplug the computer to avoid electrical shock.
-----------------
The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.
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At this point you can use a DC Voltage meter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail Voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC
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#4 Armed101

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 08:33 PM

Thanks for replying.... Just installed brand new power supply and still having the same problems.... Nothing comes on the screen it is blank... Why would having the case open matter? This might seem as a stupid question but i figured id ask.... :thumbsup: Blue LED under the switch doesnt come on... Orange LED flashes when I turn PC on.

#5 reelkill

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 07:11 AM

The fans spin sounds as if it powers up only you cannot view anything on the screen right? Are there any beeps? and I ask if you had the case open because if you touched anything without discharging yourself or grounding yourself that could be a problem for the motherboard,video card etc.

How old is this pc? and If you know what a capacitor looks like what condiditon are they in? As for the orange led are there 2 seperate leds or is it what was a blue led is now orange?
10101010101010101010100001001100010100001000010010100110101

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#6 Armed101

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 11:43 AM

I always touch the sides of the case and then mess with components, so there shouldnt be an issue with that. The power button which has a blue led under it is supposed to come on when the button is pressed... There is a orange led that is about 3 inches below the power button... When the button is pressed, No blue led comes on and the orange led flashes for about 3 seconds and then goes off and then comes back on flashing again... The pc is about 2 and a half years old. No beeps, and the screen is black and nothing happens... Ill take a look at the capacitors. Thanks

#7 Armed101

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 11:51 AM

Capacitors look ok.. No bulging or anything like that...

#8 reelkill

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 05:32 PM

uh i was just reading on another site and some are saying that some dell pc's usb ports cause it to short out so maybe try to unplug all your usb cables. I have also heard that that the cmos battery maybe causing those kind of problems but you shouldn't need a cmos battery just to boot up thats only to keep data so I think that can be ruled out. Check and make sure everything is plugged in right on the motherboard. Sometimes just discharging yourself ie. touching metal,touching sides of the case etc are not enough. I would recommend always using a esd strap to ground yourself before touching any components. Sometimes you don't even know you let a charge off and it could still be enough to kill a printed circuit board. I hope you can get it working buddy.
10101010101010101010100001001100010100001000010010100110101

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#9 reelkill

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 05:58 PM

Here i seen this on another topic tht was almost the same as yours exept his pc was posting.

Power-on self-test (POST) is the initial process executed by the system BIOS. After all of the controllers on the system board are initialized and tested, the system BIOS transfers control to the operating system on the bootable media (such as the hard disk drive, floppy disk drive, etc.). In general, no POST/no video problems may be caused by one or more of the following:

* Defective power supply
* Loss of AC power or PC not plugged in
* Defective system board
* Shorted expansion board (riser)
* Defective or nonstandard DIMM or RDRAM
* Improperly-seated components


Power LED State Description

Off
Power is off, LED is blank.
Blinking Yellow - Initial state of LED at power up.
Indicates system has power, but the POWER_GOOD signal is not yet active.
If the Hard Drive LED is off, it is probable that the power supply needs to be replaced.
If the Hard Drive LED is on, it is probable that an onboard regulator or VRM has failed. Look at the diagnostic LEDs for further information.

Steady Yellow
Second state of the LED at power up. Indicates the POWER_GOOD signal is active, and it is probable that the power supply is fine. Look at the diagnostic LEDs for further information.

Steady Green
System is in S0 state, the normal power state of a functioning machine.
The BIOS will turn the LED to this state to indicate that it has started to fetch opcodes.

Blinking Green
System is in a low power state, either S1 or S3. Look at the diagnostic LEDs to determine which state the system is in.


partial quote
" Defective power supply"(you said you got a new so this should be fine)
"Loss of AC power or PC not plugged in"(I assume that you are plugged in and the outlet on the wall is working fine)
" Defective system board"(This is a possibility)
" Shorted expansion board"(riser)"(also maybe but I think you get some beep codes)
" Defective or nonstandard DIMM or RDRAM"(once again it would beep if this was a problem)
" Improperly-seated components"(make sure you check all your connections on your components)

A good idea maybe to break it down to essential components like disconnect all your ribbon cables from you ide controllers. Get rid of everything except for Cpu Fan,Ram,Video Card,Power,etc
10101010101010101010100001001100010100001000010010100110101

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#10 Armed101

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 08:27 PM

Hmm When I turn the pc on should the CPU fan be running or does it not come on till the CPU gets hot enough then it kicks on.... When I removed the RAM, should the pc make a beeping noise when booting up? In other words warning me that there is no RAM in it? Cause it doesnt make a beeping sound with or without RAM... So should I take the battery out and then try booting? Just noticed something the CD-ROM Drive has a small green LED that blink when pc is turned on, it actually blinks at the same interval at first with the Orange LED... Then the CD Drive stops blinking and then nothing and then the orange blink about 6 times and thats it... Really strange!!! But like I said the Blue LED never shows and it should... :thumbsup: Thanks for all of the help!! I really appreciate it...

#11 reelkill

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 09:12 PM

Every bios has its own beep codes the majority of them use one beep to tell you it is functioning properly. I think you have a bad motherboard or cpu and with the powerful cpu your gateway has I would say it might be the cpu. The fan should always be running when you turn the computer on. It would not take long for it to overheat. Most systems have a shutdown temperature where if your cpu reaches say 60 degrees celcius it shuts down automatically but I think if your fan was not working before and if it ever kept shutting its self down and you kept turning it back on then the cpu prolly overheated beyond the ability to live anymore or it may have only taken one time if the computer didn't shut down automatically.

you may have seen this before but here is a link for you system Gateway GT4022 If you click on chat with gateway you can talk to a tech you will need to use serial number.

Edited by reelkill, 28 August 2008 - 10:08 PM.

10101010101010101010100001001100010100001000010010100110101

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#12 Armed101

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 02:50 AM

I bet you are right... Unfortunately... Im going to try a few other things but doesnt sound good... I kindof figured that it might have been either the motherboard.... :thumbsup: This is a PC that im working on for a family that i know, they dont have alot of money.... So I figured id give it a shot... Is there any place that you would recommend for getting a cheap replacement machine? Ive looked around but im so leery on getting them a PC that is refurbished and no tellings who refurbished the item... Id like to get them into something that is very basic but isnt a piece of junk, that wouldnt be good either.... Thanks for all of your help, I really appreciate it..

#13 reelkill

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:02 AM

Here is a replacement motherboard http://www.deal-stop.com/KTBC51GLF_FIC-KTB...3-4006105R.lmsp

Here is the replacement cpu http://www.provantage.com/amd-ado4200ddbox~7AAMD1WT.htm

Now i wasn't sure if you were just gonna replace this stuff or just get a different pc. You could just get this barebones machine and use all the stuff from the machine you have now that does not come with barebones.

That barenbones setup actually has more power than the gateway you have right now (might not look as good though) but it would be cheaper than a new motherboard and cpu to repair the machine you have now. Just use all the components that in your gateway now inplace of the components except the cpu fan and heatsink I would recommend a new.
10101010101010101010100001001100010100001000010010100110101

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