Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

If I Reformat My Comp, Will It Be As Fast As It Was The Day I First Bought It? Will My Internet Be Affected?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 pandahut101

pandahut101

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:29 AM

Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:40 PM

my computer is 4 years old. i defragment and scan for viruses but it still runs sorta slow. will reformatting it speed it up?

will my router, modem, roadrunner, and other computer's internet connections be affected?

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Guest_The weatherman_*

Guest_The weatherman_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:51 PM

Try this first http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/13500/windows-xp-tweak-guide/ :thumbsup:

#3 mommabear

mommabear

  • Members
  • 492 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 25 August 2008 - 01:13 PM

my computer is 4 years old. i defragment and scan for viruses but it still runs sorta slow. will reformatting it speed it up?

will my router, modem, roadrunner, and other computer's internet connections be affected?


In theory, a fresh system will run better, but...

Do you have an OEM Recovery Disk or a separate XP Windows CD? If you have an OEM (like Dell, HP) Recovery disk or partition, bear in mind that if you use it, it will put you back to the way your computer arrived 4 years ago. You'll have all the trial programs that have since expired to uninstall, along with any software programs that you've since replaced with something you like better, etc. You'll also have reinstalled software that maybe you no longer use.

If you have just the XP CD, then you do know that all your personal software programs will have to be reinstalled, don't you?

You should be able to connect to the internet okay, provided you don't have specific drivers for your modem, router, etc. You should round those drivers up first and have them on a CD or floppy for easy reinstall. Or locate the CD's that came with them. They should have the drivers if the XP default drivers aren't appropriate.

In short, there's a lot of preparation to do before reinstalling.

But if you want to try cleaning things up first, it can't hurt.

That manual is 189 pages! Let's see if we can try a few simple things for starters. You can start by going into your add/remove in the control panel and see if there's old software that you never or hardly use anymore. Get rid of them.

Go into My Computer-Properties-Disk Cleanup and run that. You'll also find a More Options tab in disk Cleanup. If you system is running okay but just slow, then delete all but the last restore point. After doing that, go into My Computer-Properties-System Restore. Are you set to use the maximum disk space for System Restore? Dial that back to 2 to 3%. That'll free up hdd space and still give you several days of restore points.

Again, if your system is okay, do you still have all the uninstall files for Windows Update? If you do, most of them are years old and just taking up important hdd real estate. You can get a free tool here to remove most of those hotfix uninstall files and free up more space on your hdd.

Removes Hotfix Backup files and the Add/Remove Programs Registry entries.
2003 - Doug Knox
Version 2.1.6 - 05/29/2004

When you install updates from Windows Update, backup folders are created for the files that were replaced during the update. These are created so that you can easily uninstall a particular Hotfix, if it causes problems with your system. If your system is running stable and you don't need to uninstall the hotfixes, then you can safely remove the backup files to free up disk space.

This utility will locate the Hotfixes that have created backup files on your system, and will remove those backups. It will also removes the associated Registry entries for these items in Add/Remove Programs.

NOTE: This utility does NOT remove application specific hotfix backups (Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, Media player and etc.). It will only remove hotfix backups that are specific to the Windows XP operating system.

*Additionally, you may not notice an immediate recovery of disk space. This is because the backup files are protected by System Restore. When they are deleted, System Restore places a copy in the most recent, or a new, restore point. As older restore points are flushed out, and new ones created, you'll see the space gain.

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_hotfix_backup.htm

I've used this tool on many computers. It's perfectly safe.

*If for some reason something goes wrong (I have no reason to think it will) you will have that one restore point you saved in cleanup to undo it. Or make one more restore point yourself before you use the Knox tool. Eventually you will recover the disk space it used.

After you do all that cleanup, then run check disk before doing a defrag again.

Those are some basic cleanups you can do without any 3rd party cleanup software and you should see an improvement in performance.

If you want to try more, there are programs to clean out more junk files, basic registry cleaners that won't delete anything you shouldn't delete, and lots of information on what services you can disable or set to manual (depending on how you use Windows) that will help with performance too. There's also tweaking msconfig to stop programs from loading at startup and running in the background. There's no sense in having a bunch of programs running in the background when you can just open many of them only when you actually need them.

This should keep you busy for awhile. I'm sure others may pop in with suggestions I've missed.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.

Edited by mommabear, 25 August 2008 - 01:15 PM.


#4 jcc32789

jcc32789

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:29 AM

Posted 25 August 2008 - 01:37 PM

my computer is 4 years old. i defragment and scan for viruses but it still runs sorta slow. will reformatting it speed it up?

will my router, modem, roadrunner, and other computer's internet connections be affected?


In theory, a fresh system will run better, but...

Do you have an OEM Recovery Disk or a separate XP Windows CD? If you have an OEM (like Dell, HP) Recovery disk or partition, bear in mind that if you use it, it will put you back to the way your computer arrived 4 years ago. You'll have all the trial programs that have since expired to uninstall, along with any software programs that you've since replaced with something you like better, etc. You'll also have reinstalled software that maybe you no longer use.

If you have just the XP CD, then you do know that all your personal software programs will have to be reinstalled, don't you?

You should be able to connect to the internet okay, provided you don't have specific drivers for your modem, router, etc. You should round those drivers up first and have them on a CD or floppy for easy reinstall. Or locate the CD's that came with them. They should have the drivers if the XP default drivers aren't appropriate.

In short, there's a lot of preparation to do before reinstalling.

But if you want to try cleaning things up first, it can't hurt.

That manual is 189 pages! Let's see if we can try a few simple things for starters. You can start by going into your add/remove in the control panel and see if there's old software that you never or hardly use anymore. Get rid of them.

Go into My Computer-Properties-Disk Cleanup and run that. You'll also find a More Options tab in disk Cleanup. If you system is running okay but just slow, then delete all but the last restore point. After doing that, go into My Computer-Properties-System Restore. Are you set to use the maximum disk space for System Restore? Dial that back to 2 to 3%. That'll free up hdd space and still give you several days of restore points.

Again, if your system is okay, do you still have all the uninstall files for Windows Update? If you do, most of them are years old and just taking up important hdd real estate. You can get a free tool here to remove most of those hotfix uninstall files and free up more space on your hdd.

Removes Hotfix Backup files and the Add/Remove Programs Registry entries.
2003 - Doug Knox
Version 2.1.6 - 05/29/2004

When you install updates from Windows Update, backup folders are created for the files that were replaced during the update. These are created so that you can easily uninstall a particular Hotfix, if it causes problems with your system. If your system is running stable and you don't need to uninstall the hotfixes, then you can safely remove the backup files to free up disk space.

This utility will locate the Hotfixes that have created backup files on your system, and will remove those backups. It will also removes the associated Registry entries for these items in Add/Remove Programs.

NOTE: This utility does NOT remove application specific hotfix backups (Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, Media player and etc.). It will only remove hotfix backups that are specific to the Windows XP operating system.

*Additionally, you may not notice an immediate recovery of disk space. This is because the backup files are protected by System Restore. When they are deleted, System Restore places a copy in the most recent, or a new, restore point. As older restore points are flushed out, and new ones created, you'll see the space gain.

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_hotfix_backup.htm

I've used this tool on many computers. It's perfectly safe.

*If for some reason something goes wrong (I have no reason to think it will) you will have that one restore point you saved in cleanup to undo it. Or make one more restore point yourself before you use the Knox tool. Eventually you will recover the disk space it used.

After you do all that cleanup, then run check disk before doing a defrag again.

Those are some basic cleanups you can do without any 3rd party cleanup software and you should see an improvement in performance.

If you want to try more, there are programs to clean out more junk files, basic registry cleaners that won't delete anything you shouldn't delete, and lots of information on what services you can disable or set to manual (depending on how you use Windows) that will help with performance too. There's also tweaking msconfig to stop programs from loading at startup and running in the background. There's no sense in having a bunch of programs running in the background when you can just open many of them only when you actually need them.

This should keep you busy for awhile. I'm sure others may pop in with suggestions I've missed.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.



DO NOT USE A REGISTRY CLEANER I TRIED ONE AND IT CRASHED MY SYSTEM BUT GETTING RID OF UNNEEDED FILES AND PROGRAMS IS A GOOD WAY TO SPEED UP YOUR COMPUTER...... also the photo below is my cat I uploaded it by mistake....

Edited by jcc32789, 25 August 2008 - 02:01 PM.


#5 pandahut101

pandahut101
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:29 AM

Posted 25 August 2008 - 01:41 PM

my computer is 4 years old. i defragment and scan for viruses but it still runs sorta slow. will reformatting it speed it up?

will my router, modem, roadrunner, and other computer's internet connections be affected?


In theory, a fresh system will run better, but...

Do you have an OEM Recovery Disk or a separate XP Windows CD? If you have an OEM (like Dell, HP) Recovery disk or partition, bear in mind that if you use it, it will put you back to the way your computer arrived 4 years ago. You'll have all the trial programs that have since expired to uninstall, along with any software programs that you've since replaced with something you like better, etc. You'll also have reinstalled software that maybe you no longer use.

If you have just the XP CD, then you do know that all your personal software programs will have to be reinstalled, don't you?

You should be able to connect to the internet okay, provided you don't have specific drivers for your modem, router, etc. You should round those drivers up first and have them on a CD or floppy for easy reinstall. Or locate the CD's that came with them. They should have the drivers if the XP default drivers aren't appropriate.

In short, there's a lot of preparation to do before reinstalling.

But if you want to try cleaning things up first, it can't hurt.

That manual is 189 pages! Let's see if we can try a few simple things for starters. You can start by going into your add/remove in the control panel and see if there's old software that you never or hardly use anymore. Get rid of them.

Go into My Computer-Properties-Disk Cleanup and run that. You'll also find a More Options tab in disk Cleanup. If you system is running okay but just slow, then delete all but the last restore point. After doing that, go into My Computer-Properties-System Restore. Are you set to use the maximum disk space for System Restore? Dial that back to 2 to 3%. That'll free up hdd space and still give you several days of restore points.

Again, if your system is okay, do you still have all the uninstall files for Windows Update? If you do, most of them are years old and just taking up important hdd real estate. You can get a free tool here to remove most of those hotfix uninstall files and free up more space on your hdd.

Removes Hotfix Backup files and the Add/Remove Programs Registry entries.
2003 - Doug Knox
Version 2.1.6 - 05/29/2004

When you install updates from Windows Update, backup folders are created for the files that were replaced during the update. These are created so that you can easily uninstall a particular Hotfix, if it causes problems with your system. If your system is running stable and you don't need to uninstall the hotfixes, then you can safely remove the backup files to free up disk space.

This utility will locate the Hotfixes that have created backup files on your system, and will remove those backups. It will also removes the associated Registry entries for these items in Add/Remove Programs.

NOTE: This utility does NOT remove application specific hotfix backups (Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, Media player and etc.). It will only remove hotfix backups that are specific to the Windows XP operating system.

*Additionally, you may not notice an immediate recovery of disk space. This is because the backup files are protected by System Restore. When they are deleted, System Restore places a copy in the most recent, or a new, restore point. As older restore points are flushed out, and new ones created, you'll see the space gain.

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_hotfix_backup.htm

I've used this tool on many computers. It's perfectly safe.

*If for some reason something goes wrong (I have no reason to think it will) you will have that one restore point you saved in cleanup to undo it. Or make one more restore point yourself before you use the Knox tool. Eventually you will recover the disk space it used.

After you do all that cleanup, then run check disk before doing a defrag again.

Those are some basic cleanups you can do without any 3rd party cleanup software and you should see an improvement in performance.

If you want to try more, there are programs to clean out more junk files, basic registry cleaners that won't delete anything you shouldn't delete, and lots of information on what services you can disable or set to manual (depending on how you use Windows) that will help with performance too. There's also tweaking msconfig to stop programs from loading at startup and running in the background. There's no sense in having a bunch of programs running in the background when you can just open many of them only when you actually need them.

This should keep you busy for awhile. I'm sure others may pop in with suggestions I've missed.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.



Thank you! I'll definitely take a look at this!

#6 garmanma

garmanma

    Computer Masochist


  • Members
  • 27,809 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cleveland, Ohio
  • Local time:02:29 AM

Posted 25 August 2008 - 01:54 PM

DO NOT USE A REGISTRY CLEANER I TRIED ONE AND IT CRASHED MY SYSTEM BUT GETTING RID OF UNNEEDED FILES AND PROGRAMS IS A GOOD WAY TO SPEED UP YOUR COMPUTER......


If you are referring to the link for Doug Knox, that is not a registry cleaner. He is a Windows Most Valued Professional and his scripts take the human element out of doing specific things inside the registry

But, yes we highly recommend NOT using registry cleaners to the general public
Mark
Posted Image
why won't my laptop work?

Having grandkids is God's way of giving you a 2nd chance because you were too busy working your butt off the 1st time around
Do not send me PMs with problems that should be posted in the forums. Keep it in the forums, so everyone benefits
Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook and Twitter

#7 jcc32789

jcc32789

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:29 AM

Posted 25 August 2008 - 02:11 PM

MY MISTAKE I THOUGHT IT INVOLVED THAT SORRY....

#8 mommabear

mommabear

  • Members
  • 492 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:29 AM

Posted 25 August 2008 - 04:46 PM

Just in general about registry cleaners....

I've used a couple of them for years now and never had any problems. I did my research and settled on ones that came highly recommended by other users. I found them especially useful when the registry used to scare the bejeebers out of me when I was new to computers.

However, I do understand the reluctance on this forum to recommend the use of them and I try to respect that. Having said that, I would also like to add that registry cleaners are not the Spawn of Satan. They can and do have their place.

So lighten up, folks! :thumbsup:

#9 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,281 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:03:29 AM

Posted 25 August 2008 - 08:32 PM

FWIW: It's not the premise that reg cleaners are the "Spawn of Satan."

The major problem is that users don't seem to realize that such can be dangerous tools in the hands of the inexperienced, unenlightened, and disinterested...sometimes leading to situations where users have inflicted irreversible damage on their systems and then claim to not have a clue as to what may later be wrong.

Most programs cannot do any serious damage to a system, if used by users who don't respect and understand the tool which that program is.

Registry cleaners can do serious damage in the hands of such users, since such programs routinely eliminate both files and registry entries which may be vital to proper functioning of the operating system or some program or hardware item which the user would like to make use of.

If everyone bothered to inform himself/herself about the registry, system dependencies, processes, etc...and the programs which are installed...it would not be necessary to spurn recommendation of registry cleaners or programs that purport to be such (yes, there are some that claim to be the fix, but actually are the illness).

But...since we know that many users still think of their systems as TVs with processor power...it doesn't seem like a good idea to recommend them to the many persons who frequent this (and other) forums with system problems that they cannot handle.

At least, that's my take on it:).

Same goes for those who think "registry tweaks" are something new for everyone to try out...and overclocking...and BIOS updates...

Louis

#10 jcc32789

jcc32789

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:29 AM

Posted 27 August 2008 - 07:34 AM

Registry Cleaners are not recommend by me and so I do not recommend them at all I used one and I am an advanced User on the computer so i don't recommend them at all I used one and I had to reinstall everything some of my programs didn't even work after it was finished I am talking blue screen after blue screen also The one I used was a trusted one and I cannot remember the name of it. I don't recommend anyone to use a registry cleaner...

#11 jcc32789

jcc32789

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:29 AM

Posted 27 August 2008 - 07:35 AM

yes your internet settings will be affected you will lose everything you have on it unless you have a back up in place...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users