Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

ADS and spyware


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 10rand

10rand

  • Members
  • 123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:41 AM

Posted 21 April 2005 - 08:23 AM

Since spyware is so rife I would like to add ADS Spy to my list of spyware detectives. I would like to catch spyware and viruses early before they do a lot of damage. Is there a list like Tony Klein's BHO List or Spyware definitions, I can consult when I use the ADS Spy so as to enable me to differentiate between good ADS and bad ones, and also to enable me to ask the right questions?
"The man who never makes a mistake always takes orders from the one who does."

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 tg1911

tg1911

    Lord Spam Magnet


  • Members
  • 19,274 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SW Louisiana
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 21 April 2005 - 11:04 AM

Is ADS Spy the full name of the program you want to use?
Before adding any spyware programs, you should check this list, to make sure it's not listed.
If it's on the list, remove it.

Rogue/Suspect Anti-Spyware Products & Web Sites
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#3 10rand

10rand
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:41 AM

Posted 21 April 2005 - 12:45 PM

The product is called ADS Spy 1.05, its author is Merijn( I think he is a well known personality in computer security, he is also the author of HijackThis, I think or ehhh has written a tutorial on how to use HJT) This is for check Windows Alternate Data Streams, it is also mentioned here on Bleepingcomputer Tutorials. Not that I would dream of deleting anything, just want to know what is good or bad. Thanks.
"The man who never makes a mistake always takes orders from the one who does."

#4 phawgg

phawgg

    Learning Daily


  • Members
  • 4,543 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Washington State, USA
  • Local time:08:41 AM

Posted 21 April 2005 - 03:21 PM

I am also interested in your question, 10rand.

I found another application or two that deal with this feaure.

One, the LADS didn't work for me,
the DOS screen appears/diappears in a fraction of a second upon opening the application.

Probably my fault, but I opted in favor of a GUI application from these folks:

http://www.crucialsecurity.com/.

Under the free software downloads tab, you'll find this:

http://www.crucialsecurity.com/downloads.html

Unzip it, and click the executable and you'll have this sorta result:

Posted Image

and use the "file" option at top to save a log report.

Viewing that report will bring questions to mind,
of the exact kind you ask about.

I'd like to know which are good, and why.
Which are bad, and why.

Basically, how does one interpret the results?

There is a "white paper" download available as a companion to this application,
and it provides some clues ...

Edited by phawgg, 21 April 2005 - 03:23 PM.

patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users