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System Restore- Created Duplicate Restore Point Files


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#1 bakern

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 05:30 AM

It appears that I have created 2 files that system restore uses in creating restore points.
I found that by deleating on of them, system restore returns to functionalaity.
Unfortunately, I didnt make a record of the file name that gets duplicated (slightly different duplicate).

If someone knows the file created and maintaind by the system restore process, I would appreciate you letting me know what it is so I can delete one of them.
TIA
Neil

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#2 Mike Lierman

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 04:56 PM

Wait what is your asking? System Restore creates restore points, which are hidden in a folder called "System Volume Information" on the root of your system drive. These restore points are actually folders inside System Volume Information, each folder contains versions of system files and data of changes to your system (such as software and hardware installs). If a problem occurs you can revert to a restore point.

If you are worried you have two restores are almost identical you can clear all the restore points leaving the most recent by going to Start (Orb on Vista)->All Programs->Accessories->System Tools->Disk Cleanup.

Vista - On Vista, dialog will open click "Files from all users on this computer", then on following dialog click "OK".
XP - On XP, click "OK" on the dialog that appears.

Now it will start scanning for files that can be cleaned up. When it's done scanning a new window will appear and on the top of that window there will be some tabs, click the tab labeled "More Options". Look for the section that talks about System Restore and click the Clean Up button. Then Click "OK" on the main window. This clears all the restore points except for the most recent and should resolve your duplicate restore point problem.

I do not recommend that you ever delete files or folders in the System Volume Information, as if you need that file and your system crashes you are pretty much screwed.

-Michael

#3 bakern

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 01:04 PM

Thanks for the reply.
It appears that when I run a program "acronis" which has a "try and decide" option. It creates a duplicate operating environment which allows for installation and testing new software (or tweeks, etc) and lets the user decide to keep the changes or revert back to the pre change environment.

I think this process is behind the problem but could be wrong.

Th first time SystemRestore failed to work, I found some information regarding two files with almost the same name which confuses SystemRestore. By delteing one of the files, SystemRestore once again functions with all prior restore points.

The problem is that I did not write down the name of the file(s).

I tried to create a system restore point while in safe mode and that worked (did not work in full mode) and I am hoping that SystemRestore will now be able to restore from that file. I am afraid to try the restore unless I find myself once again in need to do so.
Thanks again,
Neil




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