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Blue Screen At Start Up


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#1 Nawtheasta

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 10:45 AM

Dear Community
Just before my son went to work today he tried doing a system restore to last Saturday. He said that the track ball was acting funny. Computer will now not start up into windows. Blue screen comes up with the following Info.

STOP: C00000139 (Entry Point Not Found)
The procedure entry point FlsSetValue could not be located in the dynamic link library KERNEL32.dll
He tried to restart to last known good configuration with the same results. Happened just as he had to leave so he did not have a chance to try much else.

Computer is a Dell Notebook , running XP service pack 2

Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Best Regards
Nawtheasta

Edited by Nawtheasta, 11 August 2008 - 10:49 AM.


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#2 xXAlphaXx

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 11:52 AM

Sounds like a corrupted KERNEL32.DLL file. Shucks. Thats what the operating system is built around. No matter we can fix this.


Do you have a Windows XP CD? You can use that and preform a repair install that will probably replaces the KERNEL32.DLL and it should boot.

Don't have a Windows XP CD? I'd recommend to borrow a friends Windows XP disk because this option requires a screwdriver and I don't know how comfortable you are with that.

You could remove the hard drive and place it in a external enclosure (These are cheaper than a new Windows XP CD :S ) connect to a working computer and replace the KERNEL32.DLL that is in the Windows folder. After that place it back in the laptop and see if it will boot.
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#3 Budapest

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 10:31 PM

Are you able to boot into Safe Mode?

How to start Windows in Safe Mode
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#4 Nawtheasta

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 03:44 PM

Safe mode will not work either. Dell advised that we may want to put the hard drive into an external enclosure then using a different computer we could transfer the files to an external hard drive. After this reinstall the problem hard drive back into the laptop and reformat. Rather then do this we took it into a local computer shop today to have them fix it.
“Yikes” they just called and advised that is a crashed hard drive. They tried the freezer trick and said it came up for about a second before going down. As we have a warranty with Dell they should supply a new hard drive. That does not salvage the files though. I wonder if they would replace the drive but let us keep the old one. Maybe we could try different methods to get the data out.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Best Regards
Nawtheasta

#5 usasma

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 04:54 PM

If the freezer trick only worked for a short time, you're looking as some serious $'s to recover your data and it will require a professional data recovery service.

Dell has the ability to ship you a new hard drive with everything installed on it - so you can just hook it up, turn it on, and boot into Windows after answering a couple of questions.
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#6 Nawtheasta

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 07:26 PM

If the freezer trick only worked for a short time, you're looking as some serious $'s to recover your data and it will require a professional data recovery service.

Dell has the ability to ship you a new hard drive with everything installed on it - so you can just hook it up, turn it on, and boot into Windows after answering a couple of questions.


We just did that. They are shipping a new drive on Monday and will also fix my son's fan and processor too cause of a problem he said about that.

What I don't get though is that we did a system repair or whatever you call it by using a Windows XP CD (what xXAlphaXx suggested us to do) and it told us everything about the drive and that it was able to fix 4 bad files in the drive (I'm guessing one of them was the kernel32.dll file) but it still gave the BSOD when starting up. I'm guessing that this means that the drive technically can still be read since it scanned every single file on the hard drive while doing chkdisk but it just won't start up correctly.

From the looks of it, we are planning on keeping the laptop drive and just have Dell bill us for a new one in case we can ever find a way to get data off of it. Honestly I think it could be a bad sector that could possibly be fixed by using spinrite or hdd regenerator but I have no clue.

Do you guys think Spinrite or HDD regenerator might work?

#7 usasma

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 05:14 AM

I don't think that those tools will enable you to recover anything that the shop didn't get. The freezer trick is usually only used in a drive that's dead already - and the freezer trick will enable it to run long enough to recover data. Since it didn't run long enough to recover stuff, I'd suspect that it was truly dead.

Drives don't always die catastrophically - sometimes it's a slow lingering death marred by instances of slow functioning as the error correcting mechanisms in the drive and Windows try to keep up with the failure rate. As it gets worse, things take longer and longer to work - until, finally, it just gives up the ghost and dies.

You'd have to investigate advanced recovery techniques from a professional data recovery service - and they are expensive!!!
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#8 Nawtheasta

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 06:14 AM

Are you sure? When we tried to do a repair install the drive was fully running and 95% of the time it was only reading from the drive and not the CD when it was trying to be fixed, plus it was able to tell us what was on the drive. I'm shocked that this is a dead drive possibly because of the fact that it can still see the drive and tell what is on it.

What about Acronis True Image?

One more quick thing, I read a problem like this on Google similar to what my son has and they were able to get it fixed.

Honestly, although the PC shop seems trustworthy, sometimes I feel funny about going there because they seem to take everything for granted and treat everything as if they know everything, and yet when this problem occurred they actually had to call up dell to see what was going on.

Edited by Nawtheasta, 15 August 2008 - 06:17 AM.


#9 usasma

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 06:32 PM

Am I sure? No, I am not. My advice is based on what you've told us - and some of what you've related to us is the information from the shop that you chose to use.

If you can see the files on the drive, why can't you recover them? What errors do you get? Have you run a hard drive diagnostic on the hard drive yourself? I would suggest running the Hitachi Drive Fitness test (available for free from here: http://www.hitachigst.com/hdd/support/download.htm#DFT ) as it will distinguish between bad sectors and a failing hard drive.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#10 wolf4537

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 11:34 PM

Hi, I am Wolf4537 aka Nawtheasta's son.

First off, I contacted both drivesavers and one other company about the freezer trick and they said that is what you should NEVER do to a hard drive since you could risk wiping out your data altogether. Even if they did try the freezer trick and got it to work, that doesn't mean that they were able to actuall see the drive. They told me something flashed for about a second when it started up and then it gave the BSOD again. So it's really hard to say exactly what happened.


Second, how do you do ISO burning? Cause I don't know how to :thumbsup:

#11 usasma

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 07:26 AM

Each sector of the industry has different standards that they work by. A professional data recovery service will never use the freezer trick because it will make further recovery efforts more difficult for them. For a local shop (who doesn't have access to those tools), it's the last resort that they've got. Personally, I've only tried the freezer trick once, and it didn't work - and the customer didn't want to pursue further data recovery efforts.

You can try all the software tools that you want, but each use of the drive will increase the risk that the data may become unrecoverable. The professional data recovery places are expensive for a reason. They've got high tech tools that they've invested in, and it's alsovery labor intensive to try and recover data, and then to reconstruct it so that it's in a usable form for the customer.

From what's been related, it seems as if this is a catastrophic failure. But the use of the Hitachi DFT may be able to give you a bit more info. In the event that it says it's a sector error - it'll give you the option to rebuild the sector. Doing so will erase all the data on that sector - which seems contrary to what you're trying to do.

In that event, you "may" be able to recover something by using SpinRite, HDDRegenerator, and a bunch of different recover tools. I can't recommend any freeware tools, but I do recommend the use of GetDataBack from http://www.runtime.org. They have a diagnostic tool that'll tell you what it can recover - then you'll have to pay to recover it. Last I checked the program was $80 US for one of the versions (NTFS or FAT32). Just remember that each access of the disk decreases the chance that you may be able to recover something.

Consulting with a professional data recovery service is probably your best bet at this point. If you continue to try and recover the data on your own it may make it more difficult for the professional service to recover it (and that'll increase the price significantly). I've got an 80 gB paperweight on my desk because I couldn't afford the professional services to recover the data on it.

All of this is predicated upon the assumptions that we're making. Since we can't see the actual action that's making the hard drive fail, we can't be sure about anything until we try it. For example, if the read/write head of the hard drive is dragging across the drive platter (where the data is stored) - you're not going to recover the data, and each use will make it much worse. OTOH (On The Other Hand), if it's a problem with the circuit board on the drive, the error correcting mechanisms in the recovery software may make some degree of data recovery possible. But that depends on the extent of the problem with the circuit board.

EDIT: To burn an ISO file to a disk, you'll need an ISO recorder. This free little plug-in by Alex Feinman is my recommended method: http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/v2.htm Also, if you're got a CD/DVD burning program on your system, it's likely that it can burn ISO/image files.

Edited by usasma, 16 August 2008 - 07:28 AM.

My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#12 wolf4537

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 11:09 PM

Each sector of the industry has different standards that they work by. A professional data recovery service will never use the freezer trick because it will make further recovery efforts more difficult for them. For a local shop (who doesn't have access to those tools), it's the last resort that they've got. Personally, I've only tried the freezer trick once, and it didn't work - and the customer didn't want to pursue further data recovery efforts.

You can try all the software tools that you want, but each use of the drive will increase the risk that the data may become unrecoverable. The professional data recovery places are expensive for a reason. They've got high tech tools that they've invested in, and it's alsovery labor intensive to try and recover data, and then to reconstruct it so that it's in a usable form for the customer.

From what's been related, it seems as if this is a catastrophic failure. But the use of the Hitachi DFT may be able to give you a bit more info. In the event that it says it's a sector error - it'll give you the option to rebuild the sector. Doing so will erase all the data on that sector - which seems contrary to what you're trying to do.

In that event, you "may" be able to recover something by using SpinRite, HDDRegenerator, and a bunch of different recover tools. I can't recommend any freeware tools, but I do recommend the use of GetDataBack from http://www.runtime.org. They have a diagnostic tool that'll tell you what it can recover - then you'll have to pay to recover it. Last I checked the program was $80 US for one of the versions (NTFS or FAT32). Just remember that each access of the disk decreases the chance that you may be able to recover something.

Consulting with a professional data recovery service is probably your best bet at this point. If you continue to try and recover the data on your own it may make it more difficult for the professional service to recover it (and that'll increase the price significantly). I've got an 80 gB paperweight on my desk because I couldn't afford the professional services to recover the data on it.

All of this is predicated upon the assumptions that we're making. Since we can't see the actual action that's making the hard drive fail, we can't be sure about anything until we try it. For example, if the read/write head of the hard drive is dragging across the drive platter (where the data is stored) - you're not going to recover the data, and each use will make it much worse. OTOH (On The Other Hand), if it's a problem with the circuit board on the drive, the error correcting mechanisms in the recovery software may make some degree of data recovery possible. But that depends on the extent of the problem with the circuit board.

EDIT: To burn an ISO file to a disk, you'll need an ISO recorder. This free little plug-in by Alex Feinman is my recommended method: http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/v2.htm Also, if you're got a CD/DVD burning program on your system, it's likely that it can burn ISO/image files.


To be honest, at this point I'll do anything I can to get my laptop working. I really just want to get a few specific files off of it, cause most of the other files are games that just eat up the drive that I can re-install.

I'm more concerned about my external hard drive when it comes to data recovery, as it died 3 months ago and I plan to send it out this month.

I'll try to use that CD but as of right now I have very little free time (work sucks these days :thumbsup:)

#13 wolf4537

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 11:47 AM

Each sector of the industry has different standards that they work by. A professional data recovery service will never use the freezer trick because it will make further recovery efforts more difficult for them. For a local shop (who doesn't have access to those tools), it's the last resort that they've got. Personally, I've only tried the freezer trick once, and it didn't work - and the customer didn't want to pursue further data recovery efforts.

You can try all the software tools that you want, but each use of the drive will increase the risk that the data may become unrecoverable. The professional data recovery places are expensive for a reason. They've got high tech tools that they've invested in, and it's alsovery labor intensive to try and recover data, and then to reconstruct it so that it's in a usable form for the customer.

From what's been related, it seems as if this is a catastrophic failure. But the use of the Hitachi DFT may be able to give you a bit more info. In the event that it says it's a sector error - it'll give you the option to rebuild the sector. Doing so will erase all the data on that sector - which seems contrary to what you're trying to do.

In that event, you "may" be able to recover something by using SpinRite, HDDRegenerator, and a bunch of different recover tools. I can't recommend any freeware tools, but I do recommend the use of GetDataBack from http://www.runtime.org. They have a diagnostic tool that'll tell you what it can recover - then you'll have to pay to recover it. Last I checked the program was $80 US for one of the versions (NTFS or FAT32). Just remember that each access of the disk decreases the chance that you may be able to recover something.

Consulting with a professional data recovery service is probably your best bet at this point. If you continue to try and recover the data on your own it may make it more difficult for the professional service to recover it (and that'll increase the price significantly). I've got an 80 gB paperweight on my desk because I couldn't afford the professional services to recover the data on it.

All of this is predicated upon the assumptions that we're making. Since we can't see the actual action that's making the hard drive fail, we can't be sure about anything until we try it. For example, if the read/write head of the hard drive is dragging across the drive platter (where the data is stored) - you're not going to recover the data, and each use will make it much worse. OTOH (On The Other Hand), if it's a problem with the circuit board on the drive, the error correcting mechanisms in the recovery software may make some degree of data recovery possible. But that depends on the extent of the problem with the circuit board.

EDIT: To burn an ISO file to a disk, you'll need an ISO recorder. This free little plug-in by Alex Feinman is my recommended method: http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/v2.htm Also, if you're got a CD/DVD burning program on your system, it's likely that it can burn ISO/image files.


Well, the drive passed the test and didn't give any error messages. So something is seriously weird here. What do I do next? Should I try to like use the program you recommended?

Edited by wolf4537, 18 August 2008 - 11:51 AM.


#14 usasma

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 03:43 PM

If the drive passed the test (I assume it's the Drive Fitness Test that it passed), then that means that the program saw nothing physically wrong with your hard drive - nor did it find any bad sectors.

As the next step, I'd try running chkdsk /r on the drive. You'll either need to boot to the Recovery Console for this - or you can slave the hard drive to another computer and run it from there. This will test (and repair) any problems with the file system on the drive.

Once chkdsk /r is done, then you can slave the hard drive to another computer and recover the data from it.

Edited by usasma, 18 August 2008 - 04:36 PM.

My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#15 wolf4537

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 10:33 PM

If the drive passed the test (I assume it's the Drive Fitness Test that it passed), then that means that the program saw nothing physically wrong with your hard drive - nor did it find any bad sectors.

As the next step, I'd try running chkdsk /r on the drive. You'll either need to boot to the Recovery Console for this - or you can slave the hard drive to another computer and run it from there. This will test (and repair) any problems with the file system on the drive.

Once chkdsk /r is done, then you can slave the hard drive to another computer and recover the data from it.


If that's the case, then either the PC store really screwed me over, or it just failed at that time when they were trying to use it.

I have my new hard drive from dell right now but they really suck, cause I had to install all the drivers myself. Oh well.

Also, the same day I got it back from the PC store, I tried running Chkdsk /r on it and it told me it fixed 4 problems but it still gave me the BSOD. I'm not sure if that would happen now but it most likely still would happen. So I'm thinking about the Case idea.

Edited by wolf4537, 18 August 2008 - 10:42 PM.





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