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Pc Wont Start, Not Power Supply


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#1 chased214

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 12:08 PM

power supply is good have a green light on motherboard my computer wont turn on. it is an e machine t 28 85 try to put in more memory and it didnt fit put computer back together adn wont turn on. please help

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 01:52 PM

Well...if you tried to use the wrong memory on the motherboard...the possibilities for damage certainly escalate.

Do the fans turn?

Can you get any screen at all?

Louis

#3 chased214

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 02:07 PM

the memory chip wouldnt fit so i didnt go further with it. green light on mother board itself but nothing fires up at all, no fans, screen, nothing

#4 hamluis

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 03:09 PM

OK.

Do you have any memory that is appropriate for your system?

For your own education...a similar link, http://www.askmehelpdesk.com/desktops/emac...ower-56803.html

First thing I would do is...check all connections, reseat the video card (if it's not onboard) and reseat the RAM.

Some specs for your system: http://www.shopping.com/xPF-E-Machines-Des...or-2-8GHz-T2885

Louis

#5 garmanma

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Posted 01 August 2008 - 03:14 PM

Just because the lights on doesn't mean it's OK

The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.
Mark
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#6 Tieron

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 09:27 PM

I've gone through and done this because I'm having the same issue with my case & motherboard. I went through your steps to jump the PS, but I did not get anything when I used the jumpers. I know the power supply works because I just pulled it out of a system that has been running it for a month (brand new PS). What else is there to do? Could it be a bad processor or MB?

#7 garmanma

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 09:34 PM

If you followed those instructions step by step and it doesn't turn on, the PS is bad. It doesn't matter if the light on the motherboard is lite or not. Your next step would be to check the voltage on the different rails with a voltmeter while it is jumpered in the on position
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#8 Tieron

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 12:46 AM

It's odd that the power supply wouldn't work after I had it plugged in to another computer and it worked fine. I realize I'm trying two different things right now, both of which are two different topics. One topic is talking about motherboard issues and this one is power supply. I'm torn between the two and may just have to take the system in to get it looked at.

#9 hamluis

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 08:48 AM

Well...I'd be careful where I took a system for repair :thumbsup:.

Some places that advertise "computer repair services" are only going to sell you hardware, regardless of what the true cause may be. I'm thinking particularly of places like Best Buy.

I suggest taking it to a local shop that really is interested in repairs, troubleshooting, and customer satisfaction.

Louis

#10 Tieron

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 12:59 PM

Yeah, there's a few places near me that specialize specifically in repairs and actually told me to bring it in to test things out.

#11 Sneakycyber

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 05:40 PM

Could be that your motherboard is bad and it killed the new power supply when you plugged it in. E-machines (the older one especially) are notorious for the motherboard failing and taking the power supply with it. Let us know what the shop determines. I am almost sure they will replace the motherboard and the power supply and it will work just like new. Every one I have repaired (5 of them) that solved the problem. Each circumstance is different though.

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#12 Tieron

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 12:30 AM

I ended up doing a test on my own without taking it in, and found that it was just the motherboard. The power supply is fine, as well as the memory and every other component. It was an aging mother board (Asus P4S800D-X Socket 478) so there was no real loss from it. I appreciate everyone's responses in helping to figure it out.

#13 Sneakycyber

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 05:09 AM

Glad you got it figured out :thumbsup:

Chad Mockensturm 

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