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Motherboards?


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#1 kthxbai

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 01:54 PM

I'm 15 years old and very interested in computers. I want to maybe go in a career that pertains to computers. Anyways. Before I'm anywhere close to anyone who actually does something like that for career, I need more information. Now the way I see it: All motherboards are the same. They all hold different RAM, and different Cards like sound cards and such. And hold Like the Intel Core thingy. Haha. I have no idea what that thing is called. (Can you include the name of that too?) Anyways, the question is. I dont want to believe this. I want to believe that different motherboards are better then others. I want to know how. If I were to look for a motherboard, I need to know what to look for. Like, is there a special motherboard for gaming? Or for just data collecting. You know? I hope you all get my question.

If you need to ask me anything, feel free.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 02:33 PM

I think you want to know why there are so many different types of motherboards...and the advantages/disadvantages of one type compared to another. At least, that's how I interpret your query.

First: http://computer.howstuffworks.com/pc.htm, for basic, understandable fundamentals. And http://computer.howstuffworks.com/motherboard.htm

FWIW: The How Stuff Works site is a good site for the kinds of questions that many of us either ask or would like to ask.

Different motherboards ARE "better" than others, not necessarily because a magazine or website or manufacturer says so...but because of user options desired, increased features on one board vs another, and improved technological implementation from year-to-year.

Contrary to what some persons say...I don't believe there is such a thing as a "bad" motherboard (unless it's DOA and I've not had one of those). I believe that users tend to develop preferences for boards in the same manner that some develop preferences for the "latest, greatest" processor of the year. That doesn't mean that last year's processors suddenly become "trash", fit only for the garbage pile. It just means that certain users like to spend their money more often than some of us who buy a system and run it until one of the components dies :thumbsup:.

Back to "better" boards...IMO, any board manufactured this year...will probably be "better" than a board manufactured last year...for certain users. Enthusisasts and gamers are the persons whom all those expensive, shiny, new boards are aimed at...because they are the only ones who are truly interested in imperceptable speed differences in System A versus System B.

Most of us users...are just happy to have a working system that does what we want it do when we want it done...not enthusisasts, not gamers (I'm not a gamer or enthusiast) :flowers:.

I frequent another forum where the regulars used to routinely preen themselves on how "fast" their systems were. Not that they could really detecct the differences...they had to use benchmarks (posted) as the standard, with the system with the highest benchmarks being possessed by the "stud of the day" :trumpet:.

That sort of thing has tailed off in that particular forum, but it's that mentality that possesses certain persons. For those persons, a motherboard made last year is probably "unacceptable", while that same motherboard would certainly be an upgrade for a clown like me :inlove:. I just barely got a dual-core board installed and I see that the big push now id quad-core for consumers who don't understand or appreciate what quad-core might be.

Anyway...the best advice I can give you is:

a. Get the basics down first.

b. Do some comparative window-shopping. Go to site like www.pricewatch and just browse through the more expensive boards advertised there. Then go online and read a couple of reviews about said boards. Then see if you can go back about a year and read a few reviews of the "then" hotshot boards...see how much they are today and evaluate the differences between then and now...in terms of cost and in terms of features.

My last comment will deal with features. There is no point in focusing on motherboard features that a user is not going to utilize. If a review says this board is great for Crossfire or SLI, but you know that you have no interest at all in such...that's not a useful feature for you, but it might be John Jones.

Others will provide their (not-so-lengthy) comments :cool:.

Courtesy of Google: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=H...e+a+motherboard Just pick 2 or 3 to read and you will probably come away with a good understanding of how complex your answers could be.

Louis

#3 kthxbai

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 03:32 PM

Thanks, it did not answer some questions I had, but most of them. Thank you very much, this helped ALOT.

#4 hamluis

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 04:34 PM

Easily done :thumbsup:.

If you really want to learn about computers...I sincerely suggest that you continue to frequent this and a few other forums.

Intellectual knowledge and learning are fine...but it's always also good to listen to or read about the experiences that people are willing to share first-hand. Sometimes it save the pain of learning from personal experience :flowers:.

Louis

#5 Sterling14

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 05:14 PM

Haha, you sound a lot like me a couple years ago. I'm 16 now, and first got interested in computer internals, about the time I joined this forum. I knew absolutely nothing about the inside of my computer, and was even scared the first time I opened it. Now, I've built my own computer, helped a few friends build there's, and I've also made a few hundred dollars fixing and upgrading people's computers.

A good way is just read as much as you can. Coming on this forum most every day really helped me. Once you learn more about the inside of a computer, see if you can find an older one and take it apart and put it back together. I remember I first took ram out, then went to the hard drive/cd drive. After that it came processor, and before I knew it I had a bunch of parts laying on my bedroom carpet lol. I did some bad things though, and I know I'm really lucky that my old computer never broke while doing this. I personally believe the best way to learn is through hands-on experience.

Anyway about motherboards, it depends a lot on the chipset. The chipset decides what features the motherboard will have such as the type of ram it uses, the type of processors, how many graphics cards it can have and if it can do Crossfire (ATI multiple graphics cards) or SLI (Nvidia multiple graphics cards), plus essentially everything else. I think for the average person though, a basic motherboard is good enough. That's why companies such as Dell, HP, Acer, etc. use such cheap motherboards.

Hopefully this helps you out. It's going to be a long road to learning this computer stuff, and once you think you know it all, new technologies will come out that will confuse you even more, haha! Don't get discouraged though, and feel free to ask us for help whenever you want!
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943




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