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Registry Repair Programs?


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#1 Johnz414

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 12:25 PM

Hi,

Anyone know of a registry repair program that will correct only one partition at a time instead of drawing on the entire PC?

I've been using Registry Repair Pro and it seems to draw from the entire PC when correcting one partitions registry.

I have 2 OS and if I correct each one separately then I tend to think that there is more opportunity for mess ups if the registries of each draw on the entire PC for corrections.

Is there any danger in this?

Wouldn't it be better if it stayed within on registry for corrections?

Is there a registry repair that stays within it's own registry?

Do I really need a registry repair?

I am on my second Vista instillation for a couple of months now and I haven't used a registry repair utility yet. Should I?

Will it help?

My PC seems to be working well without it but I keep remember I could use the registry repair.

Doesn't Windows have something that does this function? If not, why not? it seems valuable.

Anyway, those are the questions that I keep going through when thinking about registry repair.

Are they more problem than they are worth kind of stuff.

So, any understanding of this and comments will be welcome. Thanks.

John :thumbsup:
John

"Genius is nothing other than pointing out the obvious",
Albert Einstein.

"I am what I am and that is all that I am, I am Popeye the Sailor Man", Popeye.

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#2 Axephilic

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 10:07 PM

I recommend not using "Registry Fixers and Cleaners" at all. In my opinion, they do more damage than good. They won't improve your system performance as much as you think. But if you are going to do it, make sure you make a backup of your registry first. I recommend ERUNT for this as you can boot with it and restore it that way if anything goes wrong.

Edited by Axephilic, 13 July 2008 - 10:07 PM.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 10:12 PM

The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results". Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.

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