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Xp 32-bit


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#1 steam07

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:11 PM

i have 4 gb of ram and xp pro but its only viewing 2 gb of ram do u have any solution? i think this is happening because the version is 32-bit but i might be wrong, any suggestions??

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#2 Budapest

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:25 PM

My understanding is that Windows XP 32 bit supports a total of 4GB of RAM, but it splits it in half, using 2GB for applications, and 2GB for the kernel (which is reserved for I/O devices). If you add the /3g switch to the boot.ini file, it will then use 1GB for the kernel and 3GB for applications.
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#3 steam07

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 06:55 PM

thnx for the reply but when i go into mycomputer/view sytstem info it shows 2.77 gbs of ram. i also checked the task manager and it says under the physical memory around 2 gbs but the BIOS shows 4gbs of total memory. Also would i have this problem if i used a 64-bt version of xp pro?

#4 hamluis

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 07:08 PM

FWIW: I have 4GB of DDR2 RAM installed in my other desktop, XP Home, AMD 64x2 CPU. My Computer/Properties reflects 3.37GB.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qi...17212821AA4CGO9

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#5 steam07

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 07:21 PM

so if i wish to use the full 4 gbs or the max of it i need to get a 64-bit version of xp pro rite? btw i m running a intel core 2 quad q6700 at 2.66 ghz.

#6 dc3

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 05:18 AM

In 32 bit Windows operating systems, the total addressable space available is 4GB. If you installed total 4GB memory, the system will detect less than 4GB of total memory because of address space allocation for other critical functions, such as:

- System BIOS (including motherboard, add-on cards, etc..)
- Motherboards resources
- Memory mapped I/O
- Configuration for AGP/PCI-Ex/PCI
- Other memory allocations for PCI devices

Different onboard devices and different add-on cards (devices) will result of different total memory size. e.g. more PCI cards installed will require more memory resources, resulting of less memory free for other uses.

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#7 Platypus

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 05:42 AM

so if i wish to use the full 4 gbs or the max of it i need to get a 64-bit version of xp pro rite?

Yes and no...

Edit: I had to break away for a long telephone discussion in the middle of the contribution below - dc3 posted in the interim... :thumbsup:

A significant portion of the top 1GB cannot be used to address system RAM, regardless of whether the OS is 32 or 64 bit. Addresses downwards from the top of the 4GB 32bit address space are reserved for various things, including virtual memory addresses, and hardware devices on the PCI or AGP buses. Physical memory that would utilise these addresses cannot be mapped into these locations.

How much inaccessible memory this will cause depends on the address requirements of individual systems. Hamluis figure would be common, steam, your result seems unusual, and may be able to be improved. However video card(s) with large amounts of memory can cause this.

With 4GB installed, if your motherboard BIOS allows you a relocation option, the topmost 1GB of physical memory can be relocated above the 4GB point where it can be accessed by a 64bit OS. If your board has no relocation option available, the 64bit OS will still be unable to utilise RAM in the reserved address region.

Edited by Platypus, 09 July 2008 - 05:45 AM.

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#8 usasma

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 08:36 AM

The issue here is the difference between virtual memory, physical memory, and the ability of Windows to recognize each.

By default, 32 bit Windows OS's assign a virtual memory space of 4 gB to each process. 2 gB is reserved for the kernel, and 2 gB is reserved for the user processes. On some systems you can set this to be 1 gB for the kernel, and 3 gB for the user - but it requires that the OS be set to use it AND that the application that's running is aware of this ability.

So, if you've got a couple of processes running, each will have 4 gB of virtual memory available to it (but not necessarily being used) - regardless of how much physical memory you have. As activity increases in the OS, the system will utilize the physical memory as much as it can. Then, as it "overflows" the physical memory, it'll be paged out onto the pagefile (which slows down the operation because it's reading/writing to the hard disk rather than the physical memory. Virtual memory doesn't care if it's using physical memory or the pagefile - it's all just memory to it.

Physical memory is limited (in a 32 bit OS) to 4 gB (although there's a whole pile of exceptions to this). And, since some of the memory is reserved for lower level stuff like hardware devices, you'll only see part of it. Additionally, some older systems had issues with DMA transfers with 4 gB of RAM and a 32 bit OS - but that's been fixed in the newer (last year or two) motherboards. Next, there may be some memory taken from your system for the video graphics adapter (if it's built into your motherboard)

In general, you can expect to see between 2.5 and 3.6 gB of RAM when you have 4 gB installed on a 32 bit OS - the factors mentioned above will affect your results.

Oh, and none of this addresses a hardware failure that could be decreasing the amount of RAM that's visible - so you may want to run a free memory test to see if everything seems to be OK. Here's the one that I recommend: http://www.memtest86.com/
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#9 steam07

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 01:42 PM

the ram is fine because in the bios it says that there is 4 gb ram installed but i still want to give memtest a run how can i boot it and how am i sappoused to use it

#10 usasma

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 07:47 PM

Just because the BIOS states that there's 4 gB there doesn't mean that it isn't having problems - the counters for the memory are different from the actual place that the memory operates from.

That being said, you'll need an ISO burner to burn the downloaded ISO file to a CD. I like this free one: http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/isorecorder.htm Read the directions thoroughly and you shouldn't have any problems.

Then, insert the MemTest CD into your CD drive and reboot your system. You'll have to tell your system to boot from the CD drive - and the key press to do this will depend on your system's make and model. Then let the MemTest test run for a minimum of 3 passes (but overnight is better). If you get errors you can stop the test and post back here for some more testing techniques (to rule out a bad stick or a bad slot).
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#11 steam07

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 11:04 AM

ok so can i burn memtest on a dvd that already has an ISO on it because i want to make a boot disk with everything in it ( such as the os and antivirus softwares and mem test )so that i dont have to use a lot of dvds because the dvd would be a waste since i only have to burn like 1 mb and the dvd would be like 4 gb

#12 usasma

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 03:39 PM

I'd recommend burning the ISO to a CD (rather than a DVD). I'm not familiar with the different ways to combine ISO's - so you'll have to get assistance from others with that.
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#13 hamluis

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 04:05 PM

If you want to make a bootable, slipstreamed version of XP...nLite is a popular tool for consolidating and removing items from the package.

nLite - Deployment Tool for the bootable Unattended Windows installation - Guide - http://www.nliteos.com/guide/

Louis




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