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Wireless Speed Difference Between Laptops


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#1 doresy

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 03:40 PM

Hi, I have a PC wired to a Netgear wireless modem/router and 2 laptops networked wirelessly.

My question is I noticed that if I hover over the wireless icon in the systems tray on one laptop it shows the speed at 48 mbps and the other is 11 mbps.

Both showing signal strength at excellent

Both doing the same browsing/programs open and side by side so what causes that do you think?
Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.

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#2 nigglesnush85

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 04:33 PM

Hello doresy,

It could be a few things like networking protocol such as wireless n/g/a/b etc Or it could be down to the amount of protocols installed.
Regards,

Alan.

#3 doresy

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 05:02 PM

Hello doresy,

It could be a few things like networking protocol such as wireless n/g/a/b etc Or it could be down to the amount of protocols installed.


Hi, gotta be in simple speak for me to have a fiddle with settings :thumbsup: I am quite good at finding my way around but need a map!

Hello doresy,

It could be a few things like networking protocol such as wireless n/g/a/b etc Or it could be down to the amount of protocols installed.


Hi, gotta be in simple speak for me to have a fiddle with settings :flowers: I am quite good at finding my way around but need a map!
Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.

#4 nigglesnush85

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 05:46 PM

Apologies,
It could be a few things like networking protocol such as wireless n/g/a/b etc
Basically, wireless runs according to a certain standard such as 802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b etc. Each standard improves the performance and speed of the previous version, for example 802.11a has a speed of 54MBps while 802.11g has a speed of around 100MBps.

To find out what version the systems are running, I would download winaudit and do a scan then check under the network TCP/IP section for a detailed look at the devices.

Or it could be down to the amount of protocols installed.
In order for the system to go on the internet it must use protocols that will tell the system how to handle different communications.

Right click My Network Places and select properties then right click the adaptor you are using and select properties.
Thee will be a new window with a list of protocols such as client for Microsoft networks. The more protocols that are checked, the slower the internet may be. Don't uncheck any as some may be needed to use the internet and possibly the systems firewall.
Regards,

Alan.

#5 doresy

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 03:09 PM

Apologies,
It could be a few things like networking protocol such as wireless n/g/a/b etc
Basically, wireless runs according to a certain standard such as 802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b etc. Each standard improves the performance and speed of the previous version, for example 802.11a has a speed of 54MBps while 802.11g has a speed of around 100MBps.

To find out what version the systems are running, I would download winaudit and do a scan then check under the network TCP/IP section for a detailed look at the devices.

Or it could be down to the amount of protocols installed.
In order for the system to go on the internet it must use protocols that will tell the system how to handle different communications.

Right click My Network Places and select properties then right click the adaptor you are using and select properties.
Thee will be a new window with a list of protocols such as client for Microsoft networks. The more protocols that are checked, the slower the internet may be. Don't uncheck any as some may be needed to use the internet and possibly the systems firewall.



Hi and thank you. Tried the last thing you suggested as I felt easy with that. I now have 3 laptops connected wirelessly, 2 running at 54 mbps and this one (mine) running at 11 mbps. What I have seen is all 3 use the same protocols but the 2 faster laptops connect using Intel®PRO/Wireless 2200BG Network and Dell Wireless 1390 WLAN Mini-C. The slower one uses Broadcom 802.11b.

I'm guessing this has something to do with it?
Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.

#6 nigglesnush85

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Posted 09 July 2008 - 04:52 PM

It could be the wireless software, it could be the transfer mode on the slow laptop...

On the slow laptop, Right click My Network Places and select properties then right click the adaptor you are using and select properties. Click the Configure button then the advanced tab scroll down the list look for Speed & Duplex
What is the setting set to?


Regards,

Alan.




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